Maison du Béton / Atelier st

first_img Germany “COPY” CopyHouses•Wilkau-Haßlau, Germany CopyAbout this officeAtelier stOfficeFollowProductConcrete#TagsProjectsBuilt ProjectsSelected ProjectsResidential ArchitectureHousesWilkau-HaßlauHousesGermanyPublished on January 18, 2010Cite: “Maison du Béton / Atelier st” 18 Jan 2010. ArchDaily. Accessed 12 Jun 2021. ISSN 0719-8884Read commentsBrowse the CatalogSinkshansgroheBathroom Mixers – Talis SVinyl Walls3MExterior Vinyl Finish – DI-NOC™ Solid ColorPartitionsSkyfoldRetractable Walls – Stepped & Sloped SpacesDining tablesZeitraumWood Table – TautBathroom AccessoriesBradley Corporation USARoll Towel Dispenser – Electronic TouchlessWoodLunawoodThermowood FacadesAluminium CompositesSculptformClick-on Battens in Victoria GardensMetal PanelsLongboard®Metal Ceilings – DauntlessWoodStructureCraftEngineering – Mass TimberPanels / Prefabricated AssembliesULMA Architectural SolutionsPerforated Facade PanelFiber Cements / CementsDuctal®Rainscreen Cladding Panels for Lightweight Facades in Apartment BlockBricksAcme BrickModular Size BrickMore products »Read commentsSave想阅读文章的中文版本吗?Maison du Béton是否翻译成中文现有为你所在地区特制的网站?想浏览ArchDaily中国吗?Take me there »✖You’ve started following your first account!Did you know?You’ll now receive updates based on what you follow! Personalize your stream and start following your favorite authors, offices and users.Go to my stream Save this picture!© Bertram Bölkow+ 35 Share ArchDaily Maison du Béton / Atelier st Photographs Area:  232 m² Year Completion year of this architecture project Houses Photographs:  Bertram BölkowText description provided by the architects. Generally High over a river meadow a sharp edged dwelling house rises on the gentle ridge of the Cainsdorfer local situation. It uses the available hillside situation of a generous property, contrasts by his clear geometry, nevertheless, consciously and strikingly with the grown landscape. Save this picture!© Bertram BölkowThe polygonal volume adapts itself in his relative cubic capacity of course in the context of a heterogeneous structured outskirts situation. The granulation and the scale of the mostly empty single constructions of the surroundings will transfer into the solitaire construction. Nevertheless, by the clarity and precision of the form, the big single openings and not least by the material of the extremely smooth view concrete facade, the house changes the usual picture of the surroundings. Construction Save this picture!© Bertram BölkowThe building was completely established as a monolithic, ferro-concrete construction with nuclear insulation. Topmost demands were made to the external highly demanding view concrete intention bowl of the bivalve outer wall concerning the quality of the concrete. By means of a two-ply, constructive armouring an extremely slender external wall strength was achieved in a dimension of only 15 cm. Save this picture!© Bertram BölkowThe smooth surface of the concrete is improved, in addition, with a fine colour glaze optically and is protected by a clear hydrophobizing prolonged before decomposition. The disguising of the building incisions in the facade was realised as a curtain wall facade with anodized aluminium boards. Interior The internal complexity and the different space heights are not discernible from Outside and are experienceable only with entrance of the building for the visitor. Also it behaves with the creation of the interiors. Of the hardness of the concrete above all natural materials step here, like dark wood, bright natural stone, cream-coloured materials and against colours which emit a big warmth and security in the combination. Save this picture!© Bertram BölkowThanks to the special construction of the house all pieces of furniture and necessary cuddies could be integrated as a unit furniture unobtrusively and in order to save space. The kitchen, as well as the large-size and surface-terse doors were sketched as individually by the architects and were integrated into the total concept.Project gallerySee allShow lessPassive Houses / Kjellgren KaminskyArticlesTafoni Floating HomeArticles Share Maison du Béton / Atelier stSave this projectSaveMaison du Béton / Atelier st Year:  ShareFacebookTwitterPinterestWhatsappMailOrhttps://www.archdaily.com/46546/maison-du-be%25cc%2581ton-atelier-st Clipboard ShareFacebookTwitterPinterestWhatsappMailOrhttps://www.archdaily.com/46546/maison-du-be%25cc%2581ton-atelier-st Clipboard Architects: Atelier st Area Area of this architecture project “COPY” 2009 Projectslast_img read more

Forest View House / Shinichi Ogawa & Associates

first_imgArchDaily Forest View House / Shinichi Ogawa & Associates ShareFacebookTwitterPinterestWhatsappMailOrhttps://www.archdaily.com/204312/forest-view-house-shinichi-ogawa-associates Clipboard CopyHouses•Japan 2011 Save this picture!Courtesy of shinichi ogawa & associates+ 21 Share ShareFacebookTwitterPinterestWhatsappMailOrhttps://www.archdaily.com/204312/forest-view-house-shinichi-ogawa-associates Clipboard Manufacturers: panoramah!® Products translation missing: en-US.post.svg.material_description CopyAbout this officeShinichi Ogawa & AssociatesOfficeFollowProductConcrete#TagsProjectsBuilt ProjectsSelected ProjectsResidential ArchitectureHousesHousesJapanPublished on February 13, 2012Cite: “Forest View House / Shinichi Ogawa & Associates” 13 Feb 2012. ArchDaily. Accessed 11 Jun 2021. ISSN 0719-8884Read commentsBrowse the CatalogSinkshansgroheBathroom Mixers – Metropol ClassicVinyl Walls3MVinyl Finish – DI-NOC™ StonePartitionsSkyfoldVertically Folding Operable Walls – Zenith® SeriesPanels / Prefabricated AssembliesProdemaProdEx Wood Facade in the Aspen Art MuseumSealantsSikaRenovation of Zeitz MuseumSinksBradley Corporation USAVerge Coordinated Soap Dispenser and Faucet SetsWoodLunawoodThermo Timber and Industrial ThermowoodAcousticFabriTRAK®FabriFELT™ for Walls and CeilingsGlassDip-TechDigital Ceramic Etch PrintingWindowspanoramah!®ah! Ultra MinimalistEngineered Wood FlooringAustralian Sustainable Hardwoods (ASH)Australian Oak Engineered FlooringLouvers / ShuttersConstruction SpecialtiesSunshades – Airfoil LuxMore products »Read commentsSave世界上最受欢迎的建筑网站现已推出你的母语版本!想浏览ArchDaily中国吗?是否翻译成中文现有为你所在地区特制的网站?想浏览ArchDaily中国吗?Take me there »✖You’ve started following your first account!Did you know?You’ll now receive updates based on what you follow! Personalize your stream and start following your favorite authors, offices and users.Go to my stream Projects “COPY” Year:  Products used in this ProjectWindowspanoramah!®ah!38 – FlexibilityText description provided by the architects. Within the forest park sits the house: a concrete shell of the simple form like box culverts piled to 2 layers. In this house, all details have been designed with a sensitivity to the context, creating a place to live in harmony with the landscape. Save this picture!Courtesy of shinichi ogawa & associatesPrimary accommodation is located on the 2nd storey, floating amongst the forest tree tops. Internal spaces are organised by the primary structural cores, which also contain all services and storage, allowing the living spaces to remain clear, pure and uninterrupted. Save this picture!Courtesy of shinichi ogawa & associatesLarge areas of glazing take advantage of expansive views to the South and when this glazing is opened, inside and outside are united. The sash of South elevation is the first use of the Swiss company Panoramah’s glazing system in Japan. (http://www.panoramah.com) The frame, and the tempered glass act together as one structural unit which allows the frame to remain as slim as possible, maximizing the beautiful forest views and unifying inside and outside. Nature reaches in through the windows, and the white luster of the floor tiles accentuates the external environment. Save this picture!elevationThe mountain climate allowed the use of passive ventilation. The combination of large windows to the South and small windows to the North achieves a comfortable room temperature in the summer without the use of air conditioning. Fair faced concrete was chosen as the building envelope to resist the strong mountain winds and dense fog, however, over time the external surface will weather and the building will become integrated with the woodland environment.Save this picture!Courtesy of shinichi ogawa & associatesProject gallerySee allShow less’REACH: The Architecture of The Freelon Group’ ExhibitionArticlesVideo: ‘Architecture Export – Created in Styria’Articles Share Manufacturers Brands with products used in this architecture project Architects: Shinichi Ogawa & Associates Year Completion year of this architecture project Japan Forest View House / Shinichi Ogawa & AssociatesSave this projectSaveForest View House / Shinichi Ogawa & Associates Houses “COPY”last_img read more

Vi-Sang House / Moon Hoon

first_img Area:  10775 m² Area:  10775 m² Year Completion year of this architecture project Year:  Houses Photographs Vi-Sang House / Moon Hoon ArchDaily Architects: Moon Hoon Area Area of this architecture project ShareFacebookTwitterPinterestWhatsappMailOrhttps://www.archdaily.com/357250/vi-sang-house-moon-hoon Clipboard ShareFacebookTwitterPinterestWhatsappMailOrhttps://www.archdaily.com/357250/vi-sang-house-moon-hoon Clipboard 2011 “COPY” photographs:  Namgoong SunPhotographs:  Namgoong SunSave this picture!© Namgoong SunRecommended ProductsEnclosures / Double Skin FacadesIsland Exterior FabricatorsCurtain Wall Facade SystemsLightsVibiaCeiling Lights – BIGEnclosures / Double Skin FacadesAlucoilStructural Honeycomb Panels – LarcoreEnclosures / Double Skin FacadesFranken-SchotterFacade System –  LINEAText description provided by the architects. These are the questions that Korean architect Hoon Moon typically throws out: ‘Why so serious? Why not laugh more?’ Moon-Hoon’s works are home to a wide array of faces. Panorama House appears to be an accordion, and Rock It Suda looks like spermatozoa. He shows a mysterious spacecraft (ongdalsam) and a Gothic castle (Sangsang Museum). Some may burst out laughing at the Darth Vader image overlying Play House. However we have to keep in mind that this reaction is what the architect fully expects. We begin to wonder, then, what causes the laughter. Is the source of this laughter satire? The answer is yes; the source of merriment in Moon-Hoon’s work is satire. Now, let me ask another question: Is it possible to satirize political and social issues through architecture? Because the various facets of his works do not seem relevant to contemporary political and social issues. Save this picture!© Namgoong SunHowever, are his works really irrelevant to current political and social issues? Let us go back to the first questions I raised. Moon-Hoon derides Korean architecture as Malddugi (of the ruled class) and sneers at Yangban (the ruling class) in Bongsan Talchum, a traditional Korean mask dance. Korean architecture could exist as a cross section of Korean society, as the Yangban class has revealed contradictions in the social culture of that time. A satire should expose social contradictions in a direct or in direct way. It is necessary to show a conflict between the Yangban and Maddugi. However, with regards to social and political aspects, Moon-Hoon reminds very personal. He evokes Korean architecture’s stagnancy at a very personal level. His architecture relies on his own taste, personal experiences, and assumptions.Save this picture!© Namgoong SunIt is true that some people burst out laughing at his work because of this personal approach; however, we have to remember that partiality comes from a very personal stance. There is no partiality without an individual ‘I.’ Our society usually forgets this point, and there has been no place for ‘I’ in Korean architecture. Until now, Korean architecture has been led by insubstantial abstract apparitions, such as modernism, de-constructivism, and minimalism, not by an individual. The reason that I consider these architectural trends as apparitions is that they are not relevant to ‘I’ at all. Every point of view is established based only upon a subjective individual, ‘I’, which is formed by external conditions such as land, climate, culture, customs, biological nature, and as on. Subjectivity and objectivity consist in the individual. Objectivity refers to the stats of objects rearranged by the individual’s logic as subjectivity that is embodied in these objects. Objectivity never means a status as it is. Until now, there has been an almost complete lack of awareness of individual. This means that there has been no ground for subjectivity or objectivity. This point corresponds to the question that Moon-Hoon threw out earlier regarding Korean architecture. He suggests starting off with a clean slate, forgetting modernism or tradition. He invites us to tell our own stories starting from ‘I.’ Through his ambitious attempt, I read Moon-Hoon’s architecture. Inchworm House, an epithet that I applied to Visang House, appears to be measuring something. One end touches the ground, and the other end stands straight into the sky. It was easy to find Moon-Hoon’s architecture in Angol, where a site was under a process of development and prepared for housing. I found two structures that seemed like his work. One seemed to wear a mask that you would only see in special effects cinematography, and the other one was Inchworm House. While making a phone call standing halfway between these two houses, I glimpsed a slight movement in Inchworm house. Afterwards, I discovered that both houses were Moon-Hoon’s works. The bent, V-shaped part of the house that looked like the curve of an inchworm at first glance appears somewhat contrived as it seems to be superficially forced to make up its own facade. However, the function of this house is closely connected to the features of the façade itself. The narrative of Inchworm House starts with the southern part of the long living room that looks like the end of inchworm. The facial impression of the house extends to the living room, giving us the feeling that we are in the inchworm’s stomach. The windows arranged in a form of a turned V on the façade of the living room seem to move, as if intended, as the light changes. The eastern wall appears to be an inchworm’s head, lifted straight up as if measure something. This wall is erected up to the second floor. These images are all reflective of an inchworm and those national images associated with it. Walking up the stair from the living room to the second floor, the allusions made to an inchworms are replaced by an elevated spatial perception and height. At the half landing on the stairs sits an ambiguous space, which is currently used as a dressing room, but was actually designed to be a future nursery. The stairs lead to an attic room above this space. If you go up to attic, you will see a corridor that stretches to the eastern wall of the living room, which goes up to the second floor. This corridor leads to the bedroom. There is another passage leading to this space. It leads from the baby’s room to the bedroom though the bathroom. The path serves as a bathroom. In other words, there are two entrances to the bedroom, though a corridor corresponding to the eastern wall of the living room and through a passage that starts from the baby’s room and passes through the bathroom. If you come out from the bedroom, you will see a small interior terrace and a high wall at the opposite. You will notice, at a glance, that the inside of the eastern wall servers as a screen. It is well within comprehension that this terrace is like the royal box of Margravial Opera House in Bayreuth. You can go up to the attic from this terrace as well. Moon-Hoon placed an Oriental painting on this terrace, which can be seen through the window frame. This house has an individual story, which makes it like a personal opera house for the couple. The space that seems to rise continuously like sound reverberations, forming a connection between the rooms and the attic is its face.Save this picture!© Namgoong SunInchworm house has the power to expose the faces and spaces of the building, creating a story in the erasure of faces in the spaces, and making us aware of the connection between them. This house is full of small but varied spaces. Moon-Hoon present a new way of creating space that Korean architecture has missed or has not yet experienced, and he demands that we read spaces in an altogether new way. To wish that this experiment extends to the exterior space is to support him, not to express a lament for something missing. On my way out of the front door, I saw a structure engraved with the shape of a human body which reminded me of a Procrustean bed. It evoked mirth, and I felt transported, as if my head had been cut clean off.Save this picture!First Floor PlanProject gallerySee allShow lessMilan Design Week 2013: Energetic Energies for Panasonic / Akihisa HirataArchitecture News2013 ‘Folly’ Competition Winner: tree wood by Toshihiro OkiAwarded Competition Share Projects Vi-Sang House / Moon HoonSave this projectSaveVi-Sang House / Moon Hoon Year:  CopyHouses•South Korea Save this picture!© Namgoong Sun+ 42 Share 2011 “COPY” South Korea CopyAbout this officeMoon HoonOfficeFollowProductConcrete#TagsProjectsBuilt ProjectsSelected ProjectsResidential ArchitectureHousesHousesSouth KoreaPublished on April 09, 2013Cite: “Vi-Sang House / Moon Hoon” 09 Apr 2013. ArchDaily. Accessed 11 Jun 2021. ISSN 0719-8884Read commentsBrowse the CatalogMetal PanelsAurubisCopper Alloy: Nordic RoyalGlassMitrexSolar GreenhouseLouvers / ShuttersTechnowoodSunshade SystemsFiber Cements / CementsRieder GroupFacade Panel – Terrazzo BlackStonesCosentinoSurfaces – Silestone® Basiq SeriesIn architectureSikaBuilding Envelope SystemsWoodLunawoodInterior ThermowoodWindowsswissFineLineSliding Windows – EvenMineral / Organic PaintsKEIMBlack Concrete – Concretal®-BlackSuspension SystemsMetawellAluminum Panels for Ceiling SailsDoorsECLISSESliding Door Opening System – ECLISSE Push&PullStonesMarini MarmiNatural Stone – Nuvolato di GréMore products »Read commentsSave世界上最受欢迎的建筑网站现已推出你的母语版本!想浏览ArchDaily中国吗?是否翻译成中文现有为你所在地区特制的网站?想浏览ArchDaily中国吗?Take me there »✖You’ve started following your first account!Did you know?You’ll now receive updates based on what you follow! Personalize your stream and start following your favorite authors, offices and users.Go to my streamlast_img read more

Frame / UID Architects

first_imgPhotographs:  Hiroshi Ueda Area:  57 m² Year Completion year of this architecture project Projects Japan Year:  2012 Architects: UID Architects Area Area of this architecture project “COPY” Photographs Frame / UID ArchitectsSave this projectSaveFrame / UID Architects CopyHouses•Hiroshima, Japan ArchDailycenter_img Hotta Construction Save this picture!© Hiroshi Ueda+ 14 Share CopyAbout this officeUID ArchitectsOfficeFollowProductWood#TagsProjectsBuilt ProjectsSelected ProjectsResidential ArchitectureHousesHiroshimaWoodHousesJapanPublished on June 25, 2013Cite: “Frame / UID Architects” 25 Jun 2013. ArchDaily. Accessed 11 Jun 2021. ISSN 0719-8884Read commentsBrowse the CatalogMetal PanelsAurubisCopper Surface: Nordic DécorGlassMitrexSolar PanelsPanels / Prefabricated AssembliesTechnowoodPanel Façade SystemSealantsAGROB BUCHTALHow To Benefit From Ceramic Tiles With Hytect SurfaceSignage / Display SystemsGoppionDisplay Case – Q-ClassFacade SystemsTrimoTrimoterm FTV in the BASE – Backing wallSkylightsVELUX CommercialModular Skylight Ridgelight in Office BuildingDoorsVEKAFront Doors – SOFTLINECurtain WallsRabel Aluminium SystemsMinimal Curtain Wall – Rabel 35000 Slim Super ThermalResidential ApplicationsULMA Architectural SolutionsVentilated Facades on Building in PamplonaDoorsLibartVertical Retracting Doors – Panora ViewAccessories / TV MountsYellow Goat DesignScreens – BlossomMore products »Read commentsSave想阅读文章的中文版本吗?‘框’中之屋 / UID Architects是否翻译成中文现有为你所在地区特制的网站?想浏览ArchDaily中国吗?Take me there »✖You’ve started following your first account!Did you know?You’ll now receive updates based on what you follow! Personalize your stream and start following your favorite authors, offices and users.Go to my stream ShareFacebookTwitterPinterestWhatsappMailOrhttps://www.archdaily.com/389172/frame-uid-architects Clipboard General Contractor: Consultants:Yasutaka Konishi, Takeshi Kaneko, Toshiya OginoSite Area:132.23 m2Architect In Charge:Keisuke MaedaCity:HiroshimaCountry:JapanMore SpecsLess SpecsSave this picture!© Hiroshi Ueda Save this picture!© Hiroshi Ueda The house aim the space such as one integral room which is a 7m×7m+X.There are Bedroom and guest room, wash room and bath room in the ground floor , also LDK and study room on second floor because of referencing around site environment surrounded 3ways. Basically the house is designed like one integral room which is 7m×7m while considering to make each space as small as possible.  Save this picture!© Hiroshi UedaIn addition that, the yard space set to road which connect to outside as extension of interior wall. Therefore we can feel the extra space more than physical extent space. Furthermore by setting this wall, it can connect to outside of area smoothly as ensure the privacy. On the second floor, it could be possible to get lighting inside without affection by around site environment from the top light which exists north to south.  Save this picture!AxonRegarding yard, we can feel south side lightning from LDK to study room integrally by setting yard on north to south. And also it could be comfortable study room owing to constant sunlight of north direction by locating study room to north side. In this house It’ s able to live as feeling gentle breeze and daily under the natural sunlight as much as possible in interior room. Project gallerySee allShow lessPink Flamingo / Stephane MaupinSelected ProjectsHouse in Ofuna / LEVEL ArchitectsSelected Projects Share Frame / UID Architects ShareFacebookTwitterPinterestWhatsappMailOrhttps://www.archdaily.com/389172/frame-uid-architects Clipboard “COPY” Houseslast_img read more

Flower House / EZZO

first_img 2013 Projects Houses “COPY” ArchDaily Photographs Architects: EZZO Area Area of this architecture project ShareFacebookTwitterPinterestWhatsappMailOrhttps://www.archdaily.com/459082/flower-house-ezzo Clipboard Year:  Flower House / EZZO Save this picture!© João Ferrand+ 22 Share CopyHouses•Porto, Portugalcenter_img Portugal Year:  Flower House / EZZOSave this projectSaveFlower House / EZZO Area:  120 m² Area:  120 m² Year Completion year of this architecture project Project gallerySee allShow lessThe Crystal Palace Architectural CompetitionArchitecture NewsA Bad Month for Frank Lloyd Wright FansArchitecture News Share ShareFacebookTwitterPinterestWhatsappMailOrhttps://www.archdaily.com/459082/flower-house-ezzo Clipboard 2013 photographs:  João FerrandPhotographs:  João FerrandEngineering:Penman LdªConstructor:Van UrbisArchitect In Charge:César Machado MoreiraCollaborator:João Pedro LealCity:PortoCountry:PortugalMore SpecsLess SpecsSave this picture!Floor PlansRecommended ProductsMetallicsTECU®Copper Surface – Classic CoatedDoorsdormakabaEntrance Doors – Revolving Door 4000 SeriesDoorsJansenDoors – Folding and SlidingDoorsAir-LuxPivoting DoorText description provided by the architects. Flower House involved the remodelling of a small old house to provide space to accommodate a single client. The scheme included the refurbishment of the existing ground floor, demolished of the 1st floor as well as the construction of a new one. The building is set within heritage site, which has drawn out a unique response to the history and settings. The building geometry, orientation and size is driven by the site constraintsSave this picture!© João FerrandAt the site, the existing buildings are idiosyncratic of their type, with flank elevations and roof profiles, which run the breadth of the neighborhood of Foz Velha. These buildings are detailed in a utilitarian manner, with an honesty of material and detailing one would expect. In responding to this condition, the design of the new building make clear reference to their historical parts. A two storey dwelling with character and personality, respectful of the existing neighborhood, and taking advantage of the views. Save this picture!© João FerrandIn the interior the project was aimed at creating a series of flowing, contemporary spaces, allowing a greater degree of flexibility, linking the internal spaces of the ground floor in just one: living, dining and kitchen. Two different stairs ensures the connectivity between ground floor living spaces and upper floors of bedrooms and study space.Save this picture!© João FerrandThe core ambition of the scheme was to create a dwelling, which, over time, would come to reflect an approach to contemporary renovation work and create a flexible environment for who will live there.Save this picture!© João FerrandAccessible via a path with only 2 m wide, flanked by old houses, externally, the building is wrapped in a homogenous white skin, which wraps up from the landscape. This relationship of building to street retains those historic associations described, and similarly allows for a contemporary sculptural form to sit comfortably within its context. “COPY” CopyAbout this officeEZZOOfficeFollowProductsWoodConcrete#TagsProjectsBuilt ProjectsSelected ProjectsResidential ArchitectureHousesPortoHousesPortugalPublished on December 18, 2013Cite: “Flower House / EZZO” 18 Dec 2013. ArchDaily. Accessed 11 Jun 2021. ISSN 0719-8884Browse the CatalogPartitionsSkyfoldChoosing the Skyfold Wall for Your SpaceGlass3MGlass Finish – FASARA™ GeometricShower ColumnshansgroheShoulder ShowersPanels / Prefabricated AssembliesMorin Corp.Metal Wall Systems – ExposedStonesCosentinoSurfaces – Dekton® Stonika SeriesConcrete FloorsSikaIndustrial Floor CoatingsHanging LampsLouis PoulsenPendant Lights – KeglenDoorsSky-FrameInsulated Sliding Doors – Sky-Frame SlopeThermalSchöckMinimizing Thermal Bridges in BalconiesWindowspanoramah!®ah! Ultra MinimalistEnclosures / Double Skin FacadesAlucoilStructural Honeycomb Panels – LarcoreWork ChairsDynamobelWork Chair – SLAT 16More products »Save世界上最受欢迎的建筑网站现已推出你的母语版本!想浏览ArchDaily中国吗?是否翻译成中文现有为你所在地区特制的网站?想浏览ArchDaily中国吗?Take me there »✖You’ve started following your first account!Did you know?You’ll now receive updates based on what you follow! Personalize your stream and start following your favorite authors, offices and users.Go to my streamlast_img read more

DCS House / Giuseppe Gurrieri + Valentina Giampiccolo

first_img Area:  400 m² Area:  400 m² Year Completion year of this architecture project ShareFacebookTwitterPinterestWhatsappMailOrhttps://www.archdaily.com/563717/dcs-house-giuseppe-gurrieri-valentina-giampiccolo Clipboard Year:  ArchDaily “COPY” Architects: Giuseppe Gurrieri, Valentina Giampiccolo Area Area of this architecture project ShareFacebookTwitterPinterestWhatsappMailOrhttps://www.archdaily.com/563717/dcs-house-giuseppe-gurrieri-valentina-giampiccolo Clipboard Photographs 2014 CopyHouses, Renovation•Ragusa, Italy DCS House / Giuseppe Gurrieri + Valentina GiampiccoloSave this projectSaveDCS House / Giuseppe Gurrieri + Valentina Giampiccolo Houses Italy Projects “COPY” 2014 Save this picture!© Filippo Poli+ 34 Share DCS House / Giuseppe Gurrieri + Valentina Giampiccolo photographs:  Filippo PoliPhotographs:  Filippo PoliDesign Team:Valentina Occhipinti, Dario Gulino, Giulia FilettiContractor:Angelo FerraroStructural Consultant:Salvatore Campo, Giancarlo Dimartino, Alessandro InfantinoCity:RagusaCountry:ItalyMore SpecsLess SpecsSave this picture!© Filippo PoliRecommended ProductsPorcelain StonewareApariciPorcelain Tiles – BrickworkPanels / Prefabricated AssembliesULMA Architectural SolutionsFretwork Facade PanelWoodEGGERTimberText description provided by the architects. The closely-knit urban fabric of the upper section of the oldest part of Ragusa has a clear 19th-century feel, with longitudinal streets running parallel at different levels, following the natural slope of the land and tied together by a criss-cross of steps.Save this picture!© Filippo PoliThe current sequence of buildings is the result of combining or subdividing properties and sometimes even modifying the old connections between levels, which once tended to be divided between the ground floor production areas and the upper floor lodgings.Save this picture!© Filippo PoliOur project is about the renovation of a portion of the fabric originally used for the production and sale of the traditional cheese. Over the years, the building has been transformed and modified several times.Save this picture!First Floor PlanSave this picture!Second Floor PlanThe solution adopted was to create a central courtyard by removing a volume from the section of the building.Such a decision reduces the living space but brings considerable benefits and allows an optimal reorganization of the spaces, making the new void the heart of the building.Save this picture!© Filippo PoliAfter the renovation, each room faces the new courtyard on the southern side; the house is closed on itself, ensuring more privacy and distance from the neighborhood.Save this picture!© Filippo PoliThanks to the natural ventilation, the courtyard acts as a chimney and  contributes to the power performance of the entire building. The new courtyard, and the arrangements of the vertical connections with the north acts like a buffer between the façade (more cold and damp in the winter) and the main spaces.Save this picture!AxonometricThe courtyard, that became the new entrance of the house, crystallizes an attitude that sees rigorous composition as the best way to combine conservation and innovation. After all, a courtyard is an element taken from a well-established building tradition.Save this picture!© Filippo PoliThe interiors are marked by a careful balance between the re-use of traditional materials and contemporary elements such as interior doors, fencing and tiles that were removed and reassembled in a modern atmosphere.Save this picture!© Filippo PoliThe original tanks used for the brine cheese and located in the basement, are re-used as cisterns where rainwater gathered and is also used  for  the sanitary system and irrigation the  plants of the courtyard.Save this picture!© Filippo PoliProject gallerySee allShow lessRIBA ARHITEKTI Creates Ceramic Mosaic for ETI ShowroomArchitecture NewsAustralian Institute of Architects Announce 2014 National AwardsArchitecture News Share Year:  CopyAbout this officeGiuseppe GurrieriOfficeFollowValentina GiampiccoloOfficeFollowProductConcrete#TagsProjectsBuilt ProjectsSelected ProjectsResidential ArchitectureHousesRefurbishmentRenovationRagusaHousesRefurbishmentRenovationItalyPublished on November 07, 2014Cite: “DCS House / Giuseppe Gurrieri + Valentina Giampiccolo” 07 Nov 2014. ArchDaily. Accessed 11 Jun 2021. ISSN 0719-8884Browse the CatalogFaucetshansgroheKitchen Mixers – Aquno Select M81Vinyl Walls3MVinyl Finishes in HealthPartners Regions HospitalPartitionsSkyfoldWhere to Increase Flexibility in SchoolsCoffee tablesBoConceptMadrid Coffee Table AD19SkylightsLAMILUXFlat Roof Exit Comfort DuoMetallicsTrimoMetal Panels for Roofs – Trimoterm SNVSkylightsVELUX CommercialModular Skylights in Atelier Zimmerlistrasse OfficeStonesNeolithSintered Stone – Iron Moss – Iron CollectionCeramicsTerrealTerracotta Facade in Manchester HospitalWoodBlumer LehmannConsulting and Engineering in Wood ProjectsGlassBendheimLuminous Mirrored GlassWire MeshTwentinoxMetal Mesh – Golf Romeo 7More products »Save世界上最受欢迎的建筑网站现已推出你的母语版本!想浏览ArchDaily中国吗?是否翻译成中文现有为你所在地区特制的网站?想浏览ArchDaily中国吗?Take me there »✖You’ve started following your first account!Did you know?You’ll now receive updates based on what you follow! Personalize your stream and start following your favorite authors, offices and users.Go to my streamlast_img read more

North Perth House / Jonathan Lake Architects

first_imgCopyHouses•North Perth, Australia “COPY” Year:  Photographs ArchDaily Scott Smalley Partnership Manufacturers: Hettich, Pozzi Ginori ShareFacebookTwitterPinterestWhatsappMailOrhttps://www.archdaily.com/594277/north-perth-house-jonathan-lake-architects Clipboard Australia Builder:Michael BradshawCity:North PerthCountry:AustraliaMore SpecsLess SpecsSave this picture!© Robert FrithRecommended ProductsCeramicsApavisaTiles – JewelsWindowsStudcoSteel Window Reveal – EzyRevealEnclosures / Double Skin FacadesIsland Exterior FabricatorsCurtain Wall Facade SystemsWindowsLibartVertical Retracting Doors & WindowsText description provided by the architects. This project set out to provide a demonstration of how a generous family home could be constructed on a small inner city block. It set out to show how a small block could still have a generous amount of external spaces for living and gardens and it also wanted to challenge the notion that architecturally design houses were unaffordable. Finally we wanted to design a house that privileged the spaces for people over the spaces for cars. No lock up garage was provided in this design but rather a two car parking area off the rear right of way.Save this picture!© Robert FrithThe site for this project is a rear sub-divided block in inner suburban Perth. Access to the block is from a rear right of way. The compactness of the site required that a simple two level house be created that has a strong relationship to site and the surrounding landscape.Save this picture!© Robert FrithThe form of the house is literally a timber box perched on top of stabilised recycled concrete walls. The heavy walls are embedded into the ground and define the internal and external living areas. The walls create a solid boundary with the right of way, concealing the openness and beauty of the spaces within.Save this picture!Floor PlanThe timber box on top of the walls contains the private areas of the house. These spaces overhang the concrete walls below expressing the box like quality of the upper level. Each space is positioned to maximise its connection to the surroundings, framing views such as the City and tree tops.Save this picture!© Robert FrithThe project is an exploration in ideas of restraint through reduction of materials and simplicity of form. A constrained budget required inventiveness of materials and detailing. The stabilised concrete walls required no finishing and painting. The timber has been celebrated through the use of a clear finish to allow the colour and texture inherent to shine throughSave this picture!Floor PlanProject gallerySee allShow lessHarvard GSD To Host Exhibition Exploring The Architecture And Symbolism Of National …Architecture NewsAD Classics: Bibliotheca Alexandrina / SnøhettaArchitecture Classics Share Projects Housescenter_img CopyAbout this officeJonathan Lake ArchitectsOfficeFollowProductsWoodConcreteBrick#TagsProjectsBuilt ProjectsSelected ProjectsResidential ArchitectureHousesWoodHousesNorth PerthAustraliaPublished on February 04, 2015Cite: “North Perth House / Jonathan Lake Architects” 04 Feb 2015. ArchDaily. Accessed 11 Jun 2021. ISSN 0719-8884Read commentsBrowse the CatalogVentilated / Double Skin FacadeTechnowoodProfile Façade SystemGlassMitrexSolar PanelsMetal PanelsAurubisCopper Alloy: Nordic RoyalFiber Cements / CementsEQUITONEFiber Cement Facade Panel PicturaCultural / PatrimonialIsland Exterior FabricatorsSeptember 11th Memorial Museum Envelope SystemConcreteKrytonSmart ConcreteSignage / Display SystemsGoppionDisplay Case – B-ClassMetal PanelsLorin IndustriesAnodized Aluminum – Stainless Steel FinishesWoodStructureCraftEngineering – Mass TimberWindowspanoramah!®ah!38 – FlexibilityChairsSellexChair – IrinaBathroom FurnitureKaleBathroom Cabinets – ZeroMore products »Read commentsSave世界上最受欢迎的建筑网站现已推出你的母语版本!想浏览ArchDaily中国吗?是否翻译成中文现有为你所在地区特制的网站?想浏览ArchDaily中国吗?Take me there »✖You’ve started following your first account!Did you know?You’ll now receive updates based on what you follow! Personalize your stream and start following your favorite authors, offices and users.Go to my stream North Perth House / Jonathan Lake Architects 2014 ShareFacebookTwitterPinterestWhatsappMailOrhttps://www.archdaily.com/594277/north-perth-house-jonathan-lake-architects Clipboard Structural Engineer: North Perth House / Jonathan Lake ArchitectsSave this projectSaveNorth Perth House / Jonathan Lake Architects Photographs:  Robert Frith Manufacturers Brands with products used in this architecture project Save this picture!© Robert Frith+ 22 Share “COPY” Architects: Jonathan Lake Architects Year Completion year of this architecture project last_img read more

SG House / Atelier d’Arquitectura J. A. Lopes da Costa

first_img SG House / Atelier d’Arquitectura J. A. Lopes da Costa Houses CopyStructures:Ricardo CostaWater Network And Drainage:Ricardo CostaElectrical:Vítor AlmeidaArchitect In Charge:José António Lopes da Costa, Tiago MeirelesCo Workers:Filipe RibeiroCity:São João da MadeiraCountry:PortugalMore SpecsLess SpecsSave this picture!© Manuel AguiarRecommended ProductsRenders / 3D AnimationAUGmentectureAugmented Reality Platform – AUGmentecture™WoodStructureCraftEngineering – Architectural & FreeformDoorsSolarluxBi-Folding Doors – EcolineDoorsC.R. LaurenceCRL-U.S. Aluminum Entice Series Entrance SystemText description provided by the architects. The house consists of two structures, perpendicular to each other, and a third one serving the swimming pool. Due to its volume this house seems to have two floors, but it is, in fact, distributed almost exclusively in one. The structure of the living rooms, with a double height ceiling, which also houses the study and the gallery located on the first floor, grants it another volume dimension.Save this picture!Floor PlanThe volume of the living rooms is marked, to the south, by the horizontalness of the concrete canopies that serve as brise-soleils. The highest structure, composed by ground floor and first floor, is north/south oriented and houses the social area (Living rooms, kitchen and study).Save this picture!© Manuel AguiarThe second structure, perpendicular to the previous one, consists only of the ground floor, and holds all the intimate area of the ​​house, as well as the service area. To the east it opens to a reflecting pool that separates the terrace of the bedrooms from the garden.Save this picture!SectionThere is also a third lower structure (that serves the pool), which appears as a kind of “filter” between the outside and the house, quite closed to the north. With the living area open to the south, the house has a private area to the east, with all the bedrooms facing a small patio and a reflecting pool. The Neighbouring granaries stand out in the south and west facing views.Save this picture!© Manuel AguiarProject gallerySee allShow lessInfographic Charts Rise of Muzharul Islam, Father of Bengali ModernismArchitecture NewsRehabilitation of the National University Library / ANMASelected Projects Share Year:  ArchDaily Photographs 2009 photographs:  Manuel AguiarPhotographs:  Manuel Aguiar+ 32 Share Year:  “COPY” SG House / Atelier d’Arquitectura J. A. Lopes da CostaSave this projectSaveSG House / Atelier d’Arquitectura J. A. Lopes da CostaSave this picture!© Manuel AguiarHouses•São João da Madeira, Portugal ShareFacebookTwitterPinterestWhatsappMailOrhttps://www.archdaily.com/612059/sg-house-jose-antonio-lopes-da-costa Clipboard “COPY” ShareFacebookTwitterPinterestWhatsappMailOrhttps://www.archdaily.com/612059/sg-house-jose-antonio-lopes-da-costa Clipboard 2009 Projects Architects: Atelier d’Arquitectura J. A. Lopes da Costa Year Completion year of this architecture project Portugal CopyAbout this officeAtelier d’Arquitectura J. A. Lopes da CostaOfficeFollowProductConcrete#TagsProjectsBuilt ProjectsSelected ProjectsResidential ArchitectureHousesSão João da MadeiraHousesPortugalPublished on March 29, 2015Cite: “SG House / Atelier d’Arquitectura J. A. Lopes da Costa” 29 Mar 2015. ArchDaily. Accessed 11 Jun 2021. ISSN 0719-8884Browse the CatalogSinkshansgroheBathroom Mixers – FocusGlass3MInterior Finishes at U.S. Bank StadiumPartitionsSkyfoldMarkerboard Finish for Folding WallsFiber Cements / CementsSwisspearlFiber Cement Cladding Panels in B66 Business CenterMembranesEffisusFaçade Protection – Breather+Metal PanelsSculptformClick-on Battens in WestConnex M8 JunctionPanels / Prefabricated AssembliesBruagBack-Ventilated Facades – CELLONTiles / Mosaic / GresiteMargresPorcelain Tiles – Linea CosmosGlassDip-TechCeramic Printing for Public TransportationAcousticSchöckStaircase Insulation – Tronsole®Porcelain StonewareApavisaSlabs – Wild ForestBulbs / SpotsAmbiance LumiereLighting – ZetaMore products »Save世界上最受欢迎的建筑网站现已推出你的母语版本!想浏览ArchDaily中国吗?是否翻译成中文现有为你所在地区特制的网站?想浏览ArchDaily中国吗?Take me there »✖You’ve started following your first account!Did you know?You’ll now receive updates based on what you follow! Personalize your stream and start following your favorite authors, offices and users.Go to my streamlast_img read more

Zellwegerpark Uster / Herzog & de Meuron

first_img 2015 Year:  “COPY” Zellwegerpark Uster / Herzog & de Meuron Zellwegerpark Uster / Herzog & de MeuronSave this projectSaveZellwegerpark Uster / Herzog & de Meuron 2015 Area:  6400 m² Area:  6400 m² Year Completion year of this architecture project Mixed Use Architecture “COPY” Year:  photographs:  Erica OvermeerPhotographs:  Erica OvermeerArtist Collaboration:Erik SteinbrecherConstruction Management:B+P Baurealisation AGElectrical Engineering:Pro EngineeringHvac Engineering:Waldhauser + Hermann AGLandscape Design:Hager Partner AGPlumbing Engineering:BLM-HaustechnikStructural Engineering:Schnetzer PuskasCost Consultant:B+P Baurealisation AGAcoustics:Martin Lienhard BauBuilding Physics:Zimmermann + Leuthe GmbHGeotechnical Consultant:Sieber Cassina + Partner AGBat Consultant:Hans-Peter StutzEcologist:Ver OekSite Area:4400 sqmArchitect In Charge:Jacques Herzog, Pierre de Meuron, Christine BinswangerAssociate, Project Director:Michael FischerAssociate, Project Managers:Alexander FranzProject Manager:Salomé GutscherProject Team:Nathalie Birkhäuser, Alen Guberinic, Emmanuel Guilloux, Vasilis Kalisperakis, Beatus Kopp, Aron Lorincz, Christian Schmitt, Eric Stutz, André Vergueiro, Miriam Waltz, Christoph Wassmann, Romy WeberCity:UsterCountry:SwitzerlandMore SpecsLess SpecsSave this picture!© Erica OvermeerText description provided by the architects. Zellweger Park, a former industrial site in Uster, Switzerland, has been converted into a mixed-use neighborhood featuring high-quality architecture and contemporary art. Within this framework, Herzog & de Meuron have completed a building containing 32 apartments in the mid-range price segment. It is adjacent to the administrative headquarters and showroom pavilion of Zellweger Luwa, designed in the 1960s by the Swiss architect Roland Rohn.Save this picture!© Erica OvermeerThe eight-story cube is situated in the middle of the park on the shores of the Herterweiher. It stands at an angle to the neighboring buildings to maximize the orientation toward the sun. The apartments, with a square ground plan, are placed in the corners one above the other, affording views in two directions of Uster Castle, the Herterweiher pond, Lake Greifensee and the Alps. The building as a whole seems to be hovering above the level of the public park, ensuring privacy for the ground floor tenants.Save this picture!© Erica OvermeerThe circulation typology in this building provides a great measure of privacy and vibrant contact with the natural surroundings. The apartments are each accessed individually through two lifts in middle of the building, which has no shared hallways. The staircases are placed outside at the four corners of the building in combination with spacious balconies, linking each apartment directly to the park. These round towers are each positioned differently to maximize both sunlight and discretion for tenants. When they come from the park, they can use the stairwell to access their apartments via the balconies: large, crescent-shaped loggias, fitted with curtains, like an additional room, with railings consisting of white wooden picket fences created by the artist Erik Steinbrecher.Save this picture!© Erica OvermeerThe façade, a concrete grid throughout, was poured using the most inexpensive formwork. The expression of the concrete is raw and mistakes were corrected only if technically necessary. The windows of aluminum and wood allow considerable sunlight into the deep apartments and afford magnificent views of the old trees and the neighboring buildings across the pond and into the park. Despite energy efficiency codes, it was possible to insert large picture windows because the building is a cube and as such very compact.Save this picture!© Erica OvermeerThe spaciousness of the apartments is generated by an open floor plan with a flowing sequence of spaces; there are no halls inside the apartments either. All of the rooms are accessed from the centrally located open kitchen. There are two types of apartments with 4 1⁄2 and 5 1⁄2 rooms respectively.Save this picture!© Erica OvermeerThe interior walls of concrete or masonry are all loadbearing. Time-tested, high-quality materials typically available in Switzerland have been used throughout: Forster kitchens, strip flooring, white painted stucco walls, and fair-faced concrete ceilings. The bathrooms are tiled. The sturdy shell of the building, the solid fittings and the down-to-earth detailing resonate with the character of the former industrial site.Project gallerySee allShow lessProject locationAddress:Uster, SwitzerlandLocation to be used only as a reference. It could indicate city/country but not exact address. Share ShareFacebookTwitterPinterestWhatsappMailOrhttps://www.archdaily.com/774622/zellwegerpark-uster-herzog-and-de-meuron Clipboard ShareFacebookTwitterPinterestWhatsappMailOrhttps://www.archdaily.com/774622/zellwegerpark-uster-herzog-and-de-meuron Clipboard Save this picture!© Erica Overmeer+ 7 Share Projects ArchDaily Photographs Architects: Herzog & de Meuron Area Area of this architecture project Switzerland CopyAbout this officeHerzog & de MeuronOfficeFollowProductConcrete#TagsProjectsBuilt ProjectsSelected ProjectsMixed Use ArchitectureResidential ArchitectureHousingApartmentsCommercial ArchitectureRetailShowroomUsterSwitzerlandPublished on October 04, 2015Cite: “Zellwegerpark Uster / Herzog & de Meuron” 04 Oct 2015. ArchDaily. Accessed 11 Jun 2021. ISSN 0719-8884Read commentsBrowse the CatalogLouvers / ShuttersTechnowoodSunshade SystemsCompositesMitrexPhotovoltaic Solar Cladding – BIPV CladdingMetal PanelsAurubisCopper Alloy: Nordic BronzeBathroomsGeberitBathroom Series – ONESkylightsLAMILUXGlass Skylight F100 CircularMetal PanelsTrimoQbiss One in Equinix Data CentreSignage / Display SystemsGoppionDisplay Case – Q-ClassAluminium CompositesAmerican MetalcraftAluminum Panels – Decorative Fencing for BridgesPanels / Prefabricated AssembliesULMA Architectural SolutionsWater Facade PanelDoorsLinvisibileLinvisibile Concealed Sliding Door | MareaWall / Ceiling LightsiGuzziniExterior Light – WalkyWoodPlycoWood Boards – Birch LaserplyMore products »Read commentsSave想阅读文章的中文版本吗?乌斯特市Zellweger 公园社区 / Herzog & de Meuron是否翻译成中文现有为你所在地区特制的网站?想浏览ArchDaily中国吗?Take me there »✖You’ve started following your first account!Did you know?You’ll now receive updates based on what you follow! Personalize your stream and start following your favorite authors, offices and users.Go to my stream CopyMixed Use Architecture, Apartments, Showroom•Uster, Switzerlandlast_img read more

Aufbau Haus 84 / Barkow Leibinger

first_img Year:  Projects Ingenieurbüro Marzahn & Rentzsch ShareFacebookTwitterPinterestWhatsappMailOrhttps://www.archdaily.com/777713/aufbau-haus-84-barkow-leibinger Clipboard Aufbau Haus 84 / Barkow Leibinger Aufbau Haus 84 / Barkow LeibingerSave this projectSaveAufbau Haus 84 / Barkow Leibinger Save this picture!© Stefan Müller+ 18 Share Germany Team Competition:Martina Bauer, Michael Bölling, Clemens Gerritzen, Pearl Tae Kang, Elizaveta Mosina, Dylan Marx Wood, Jens WeßelProject Architect:Andreas LangTeam Construction:Sebastian Awick, Marian Beschoner, Clemens Gerritzen, Pearl Tae Kang, Elizaveta Mosina, Konrad Scholz, Model: Jens WeßelExecution Planning:G+S ARCHITEKTENClimate/ Energy Design:Ingenieurbüro SICKFire Protection:hhpberlinAcoustical Engineer:Ingenieurbüro Dr. Jödicke & PartnerCost Consultant:Manfred Schasler ArchitekturbüroLighting Design:Günter RiesArchitects In Charge:Frank Barkow, Regine LeibingerCity:BerlinCountry:GermanyMore SpecsLess SpecsSave this picture!© Stefan MüllerRecommended ProductsPorcelain StonewareApavisaBetonWoodAccoyaAccoya® CanalsConsole tablesBoConceptLos Angeles Lounge Table 6270Text description provided by the architects. Aufbau Haus 84, Berlin.An open, flexible, reinforced concrete skeleton and simple, robust materials – with this typical loft-character, the second construction phase of the Aufbau Haus offers a fitting framework for creative industry tenants with their varying usage requirements and individual configuration needs.Save this picture!© Ina Reinecke/ Barkow LeibingerConcept | Typology.The Aufbau Haus 84 closes a gap in the city block at the southwest side of Moritzplatz in Berlin Kreuzberg. The project arose out of a 2012 competition and complements the neighboring building that established a creative center combining cultural offerings like exhibitions, theater and club events with numerous retail entities and service suppliers in support of the creative sector. Aufbau Haus 84 & 85 is named after the Aufbau Verlag, whose headquarters are on site.Save this picture!© Stefan MüllerThe new building mediates between the historical Elsnerhaus, dating back to 1914, and the first building section, Aufbau Haus 85: the former is characterized by the strong relief of its façade executed in shell limestone; the latter by its exposed concrete façade and large-scale openings (architects: Clarke und Kuhn, 2011).Save this picture!SectionIn its own architectural language, Aufbau Haus 84 connects the old and the new within the tradition of converting unused industrial and commercial buildings into loft spaces; the nearby Pelikan-Haus on Ritterstrasse by Kurt Berndt, or the buildings at Oranienplatz and Engelbecken designed by Max and Bruno Taut are emblematic examples found in the complex’s immediate Kreuzberg surroundings. Further important design references were the timelessly modern industrial buildings by Albert Kahn, including his Detroit building for the Packard Motor Car Company.Save this picture!© Stefan MüllerUrban planning | Interior organization.Regarding urban planning, the five- to seven-story building closes the chamfered border of the square and the perspective alongside Oranienstrasse. The new building represents the historical, sub-divided plot layout of the pre-existing city structure: It is divided into three segments, each with different floor heights.Save this picture!© Stefan MüllerThe most prominent, corner building section angled towards Moritzplatz boasts generous ceiling heights and a spacious entrance area; an intermediate building abuts split-level to this corner structure, situated alongside Oranienstrasse and with reduced, functional floor heights; a narrow passage building to Elsnerhaus approaches the visual language of the extant building’s façade structure.Save this picture!© Stefan MüllerReceding back from both sides of the building, a penthouse rises above the building sections on Oranienstrasse, meeting the height of Elsnerhaus. Several cuts into the volume — the funnel-shaped central entrance; an open, large-scale, second floor loggia overlooking Moritzplatz; and an arcade passage to Elsnerhaus — create direct pathways and sightlines to the inner courtyard, connecting it to the city space.Save this picture!© Ina Reinecke/ Barkow LeibingerGastronomy, an exhibition space and a gallery occupy the ground floor. The remainder of the building consists of modular, flexibly linkable units rented to different artistic and creative industry entities like the „design akademie berlin“, film companies, agencies, architecture offices, and design and music studios.Save this picture!© Stefan MüllerConstruction | Façade | Material.The appearance of the new building is characterized by its gridded concrete structure, visually reinforced on the façade via lightly colored, mounted precast concrete elements. In leaping between different floor heights, a variegated grid pattern is created.Save this picture!© Stefan MüllerOn the upper floors, the resulting fields are filled with solid dark-grey granite panels. Height variances among the natural stone slabs, as well as the directional shifts within their diagonal grain, emphasize the intersections of the construction, while the variably proportioned recesses within the concrete grid mediate the transitions between the neighboring buildings.Save this picture!© Ina Reinecke/ Barkow LeibingerThe façade on the courtyard side is based on the same design principle, but maintains a different appearance via loggias and greenery through integrated planting troughs: over the course of time, the strict concrete structure will be overgrown by climbing plants. The offset penthouse differs from the concrete construction: wooden cassettes span an open, column-free interior flanked by terraces, providing sweeping views over the city’s rooftops.Save this picture!© Stefan MüllerProject gallerySee allShow lessAD Interviews: BIG’s Jakob Lange / Chicago Architecture BiennialInterviewsgmp Designs New Headquarters for CNPEC in Shenzhen, ChinaUnbuilt ProjectProject locationAddress:Prinzenstraße 84, 10969 Berlin, GermanyLocation to be used only as a reference. It could indicate city/country but not exact address. Share Project Management: Landscape Architect: ArchDaily ShareFacebookTwitterPinterestWhatsappMailOrhttps://www.archdaily.com/777713/aufbau-haus-84-barkow-leibinger Clipboard Electrical Engineering: Year:  2015 Ed. Züblin AGcenter_img Hausverwaltung Baubetreuung S. Wundermann “COPY” Capatti Staubach Photographs CopyMixed Use Architecture, Gallery, Penthouse•Berlin, Germany Mixed Use Architecture photographs:  Stefan Müller, Ina Reinecke/ Barkow LeibingerPhotographs:  Stefan Müller, Ina Reinecke/ Barkow Leibinger Architects: Barkow Leibinger Area Area of this architecture project Structural Engineer: 2015 Area:  8335 m² Area:  8335 m² Year Completion year of this architecture project CopyAbout this officeBarkow LeibingerOfficeFollowProductsWoodSteelConcrete#TagsProjectsBuilt ProjectsSelected ProjectsMixed Use ArchitectureCultural ArchitectureMuseums & ExhibitGalleryResidential ArchitectureHousingPenthouseBerlinGermanyPublished on November 27, 2015Cite: “Aufbau Haus 84 / Barkow Leibinger” 27 Nov 2015. ArchDaily. Accessed 11 Jun 2021. ISSN 0719-8884Read commentsBrowse the CatalogLouvers / ShuttersTechnowoodSunshade SystemsCompositesMitrexPhotovoltaic Solar Cladding – BIPV CladdingMetal PanelsAurubisCopper Alloy: Nordic BronzeBathroomsGeberitBathroom Series – ONESkylightsLAMILUXGlass Skylight F100 CircularMetal PanelsTrimoQbiss One in Equinix Data CentreSignage / Display SystemsGoppionDisplay Case – Q-ClassAluminium CompositesAmerican MetalcraftAluminum Panels – Decorative Fencing for BridgesPanels / Prefabricated AssembliesULMA Architectural SolutionsWater Facade PanelDoorsLinvisibileLinvisibile Concealed Sliding Door | MareaWall / Ceiling LightsiGuzziniExterior Light – WalkyWoodPlycoWood Boards – Birch LaserplyMore products »Read commentsSave世界上最受欢迎的建筑网站现已推出你的母语版本!想浏览ArchDaily中国吗?是否翻译成中文现有为你所在地区特制的网站?想浏览ArchDaily中国吗?Take me there »✖You’ve started following your first account!Did you know?You’ll now receive updates based on what you follow! Personalize your stream and start following your favorite authors, offices and users.Go to my stream General Contractor: “COPY” IRG Ingenieurgesellschaft für rationelle Gebäudetechnik mbHlast_img read more