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WHS GIRLS TENNIS Wildcats Keep Rolling Defeat Billerica 50

first_imgWILMINGTON, MA —The WHS Girls Varsity Tennis Team defeated Billerica High, 5-0, on Tuesday, May 1 in Wilmington.Wilmington junior Emily Hill defeated Sarah Bojsen, 6-0, 6-0.Wilmington junior Lia Kourkoutas defeated Katelyn Sullivan, 6-4, 6-0.Wilmington sophomore Carolyn Roney defeated Makayla Threhane, 6-0, 6-0.Wilmington junior Jessica D’Arco and senior Krista Brown defeated Madhu Velmurugan and Lany Waytt, 6-0, 6-1.Wilmington seniors Jill Roche and Lauren Field defeated Jen Machatelo and Anya Lavalle, 6-0, 6-2.Like Wilmington Apple on Facebook. Follow Wilmington Apple on Twitter. Follow Wilmington Apple on Instagram. Subscribe to Wilmington Apple’s daily email newsletter HERE. Got a comment, question, photo, press release, or news tip? Email wilmingtonapple@gmail.com.Share this:TwitterFacebookLike this:Like Loading… RelatedWHS GIRLS TENNIS: Wildcats Win Third Matchup In Three DaysIn “Sports”WHS GIRLS TENNIS: Wildcats Defeat Stoneham & Wakefield On Back-To-Back DaysIn “Sports”WHS GIRLS TENNIS: Wilmington Sweeps MelroseIn “Sports”last_img read more

Shawsheen Tech Students Earn 70 Medals At SkillsUSA Competition with PHOTOS

first_imgBILLERICA, MA — On Thursday, March 14, 2019  Shawsheen Tech sent 189 students to compete at the SkillsUSA District Competition at Greater Lowell Regional Technical High School. The students competed against schools in their technical areas, challenging their knowledge, in hopes of qualifying for State Competition held this April. Shawsheen students took a written assessment in their technical/trade, an additional test for employability and SkillsUSA Knowledge, as well as an OSHA test in safety. At the end of the day, Shawsheen brought home a total of 70 medals. Gold Medal Winners:Brooke MacInnes, Grade 12, Billerica, Architectural DraftingAmaan Shaikh, Grade 12, Billerica, Automated Manual Technician – DrafterCorrina Jarzynka, Grade 12, Billerica, Culinary ArtsElaina Cobb, Grade 12, Billerica, Health Knowledge BowlSkylar McGarry, Grade 12, Billerica, Medical AssistingCaitlyn Tsoukalas, Grade 12, Billerica, Medical MathFancis O’Connor, Grade  10, Billerica, Power Equipment TechnicianMohammadali Khalifa, Grade 10, Billerica, Robotics & Automation TechnicianJoshua Cabral, Grade 11, Billerica, Team Works – ElectricianTroy Tamis, Grade 12, Billerica, Team Works – PlumberGrace Clark, Grade 11, Bedford, State Officer CandidateAshley Pergamo, Grade 12, Burlington, Automotive Refinishing TechnologyCameron Hudson, Grade 12, Burlington, MechatronicsThomas Vincent, Grade  12, Burlington, Mobile Robotic TechnologyJasin Hensley, Grade 10, Burlington, Robotics & Automation TechnicianMadison Shipka, Grade 12, Burlington, Urban Search & RescueJason Elias, Grade 11, Tewksbury, Automated Manual Technician -MachinistKevin Realejo, Grade 11, Tewksbury, Automated Manual Technician -MachinistJodi Bagrowski, Grade 11, Tewksbury, EstheticsSarah Molander, Grade 11, Tewksbury, Graphic CommunicationsLeah Veloz, Grade 11, Tewksbury, Health Knowledge BowlAllyson Haley, Grade 11, Tewksbury, Health Knowledge BowlMichael Reppucci, Grade 12, Tewksbury, Industrial Motor ControlBrooke Gerry, Grade 11, Tewksbury, MasonryJohn Nowell IV, Grade 12, Tewksbury, MechatronicsDylan Melanson, Grade 12, Tewksbury, PlumbingZachary Kelly, Grade 11, Tewksbury, Team Works – CarpenterJames MacKenzie, Grade 12, Tewksbury, Team Works – MasonAnnalea Martins, Grade  11, Wilmington, Basic Health Care SkillsZachary Dancewicz, Grade 12, Wilmington, CarpentryNathan Helmar, Grade 12, Wilmington, Diesel Equipment TechnicianJuila Messina, Grade 11, Wilmington, Graphic Imaging SublimationOlivia Sanchez, Grade 10, Wilmington, Health Knowledge BowlAndrew Miller, Grade 12, Wilmington, Mobile Robotic TechnologyCelina Barczak, Grade 11, Wilmington, Nursing AssistingAmanda Howell, Grade 10, Wilmington, Technical DraftingJames Ward, Grade 12, Wilmington, Urban Search & RescueSilver Medals Winners:Connor Rich, Grade 11, Billerica, Architectural DraftingEmily Morris, Grade 12, Billerica, Dental AssistantDaniel Matarazzo, Grade 12, Billerica, Diesel Equipment TechnicianCassidy Bulmer, Grade 12, Billerica, Health Knowledge BowlBrayden Taylor, Grade 11, Billerica, Mobile Robotic TechnologyMatthew Canadas, Grade 11, Billerica, Mobile Robotic TechnologyMackenzie Cassidy, Grade 12, Billerica, Nursing AssistingShaunna Ford, Grade 12, Billerica, Screen Print TechnologyTaylor Sacco, Grade 11, Bedford, Health Knowledge BowlAntavious Nordquist, Grade 10, Bedford, Technical DraftingChristina Paras, Grade 11, Burlington, Graphic Imaging SublimationJenna Hensley, Grade 11, Burlington, Health Knowledge BowlJames Sweeney, Grade 11, Burlington, PlumbingAnthony Prezioso, Grade 10, Tewksbury, CarpentryRachel Conway, Grade 12, Tewksbury, MasonryMichael Rosa, Grade 11, Tewksbury, Team Works – CarpenterDavid Williams III, Grade 11, Tewksbury, Team Works – ElectricianBrendan Gray, Grade 11, Tewksbury, Team Works – T2 PlumberCole Privetera, Grade 11, Tewksbury, Health Knowledge BowlMadison Musto, Grade 12, Wilmington, Team Works – MasonJessica Stevens, Grade 11, Wilmington, Technical Computer ApplicationsBronze Medal Winners:Taylor Thurell, Grade 12, Billerica, Basic Health Care SkillsZachary Langlois, Grade 11, Billerica, CarpentrySamantha Collins, Grade 12, Billerica, Health Knowledge BowlBrooke Amato, Grade 12, Billerica, Health Knowledge BowlShawn Powderly, Grade 12, Billerica, PlumbingMichael Cremens, Grade 11, Billerica, Sheet MetalVeronika Bazzinotti, Grade 12, Tewksbury, Dental AssistantCameron Loder, Grade 10, Tewksbury, Diesel Equipment TechnicianAlexa Krogstie, Grade 11, Tewksbury, Health Knowledge BowlMadison Gray, Grade 12, Tewksbury, Health Knowledge BowlTaryn King, Grade 12, Wilmington, Graphic CommunicationsAmanda Ramsdell, Grade 11, Wilmington, MasonryGold and silver medal winners have earned their ticket to the annual State Leadership & Skills Conference.At that Conference, more than 2,500 students will compete in 86 occupational and leadership skill areas. Shawsheen students will compete in the practical skills portion of each contest to become a Gold medalist from Massachusetts, earning the opportunity to join more than 6,000 students to compete in the annual national-level SkillsUSA Championships.Photos:Sweeping in Carpentry: Tewksbury sophomore Anthony Preziso (silver), Wilmington senior Zachary Dancewicz (gold), & Billerica junior Zachary Langlois (bronze)Winning the gold medal in culinary arts was Billerica senior Corrina JarzynkaTaking gold in the Health Knowledge Bowl were Tewksbury junior Leah Veloz, Wilmington sophomore Olivia Sanchez, Billerica senior Elaina Cobb, and Tewksbury junior Allyson Haley. Elaina and Leah are hoping to lead another team to nationals this year.Sweeping the Masonry contest: Tewksbury senior Rachel Conway (silver), Tewksbury junior Brooke Gerry (gold), & Wilmington junior Amanda Ramsdell (bronze)Sweeping in the Plumbing contest: Burlington junior James Sweeney (silver), Tewksbury senior Dylan Melanson (gold), and Billerica senior Shawn Powderly (bronze)Winning the silver medals in screening was Billerica senior Shaunna Ford. Shaunna is hoping for another chance to attend the National Conference and better her 4th place standing in the nation.Winning gold in Team Works: Back — Tewksbury senior James MacKenzie, Left to Right: Tewksbury junior Zachary Kelley, Billerica senior Troy Tamis, & Billerica junior Joshua CabralBring home medals in Technical Drafting were Wilmington sophomore Amanda Howell (gold) and Bedford sophomore Antavious Nordquist (silver)(NOTE: The above press release is from the Shawsheen Tech.)Like Wilmington Apple on Facebook. Follow Wilmington Apple on Twitter. Follow Wilmington Apple on Instagram. Subscribe to Wilmington Apple’s daily email newsletter HERE. Got a comment, question, photo, press release, or news tip? Email wilmingtonapple@gmail.com.Share this:TwitterFacebookLike this:Like Loading… RelatedShawsheen Tech Students Win 30 Medals At SkillsUSA State ConferenceIn “Education”Shawsheen Tech Celebrates SkillsUSA National MedalistsIn “Education”4 Wilmington Students Earn SkillsUSA Medals At Shawsheen TechIn “Education”last_img read more

Kamal Haasans Indian 2 to change hands will Sun Pictures take over

first_imgKamal Haasan’s poster in Indian 2.PR HandoutRumours on Indian 2 being dropped by Lyca Productions are growing stronger by each day. It was said that the shooting of the Kamal Haasan-starrer would begin once the Lok Sabha elections are over, but the production house is believed to be not showing much interest on funding the film as they are unsure of recovering the investment.Going by the latest set of speculations, Shankar is planning to meet the bosses from the production house once again soon to convince them, failing which the director will be left with no other option but to find another producer. The production house which has the capacity to fund a movie of such a large scale is none other than Sun Pictures.Sun Pictures is a leading production house in Kollywood and had funded Shankar’s earlier film Enthiran – The Robot. It was believed to be made with the budget of Rs 132 crore.The cost of Indian 2 is rumoured to be over Rs 150 crore.Indian 2 was formally launched in January after Shankar spent over a year preparing for the movie. The plan was to make it in multiple languages and the makers had approached some of the big names to play the villain role.Ajay Devgn, Abhishek Bachchan and many other B-town biggies were approached for the movie, but the stars could not take up for one or the reason. Kajal Aggarwal was brought on board to play the female lead and the shooting was commenced.In the first schedule of the shooting itself, the Kamal Haasan-starrer overran its allotted cost which reportedly made the production house to have a second thought about the film.last_img read more

Nirmala Sitharaman as defence minister is good news for Make in India

first_imgDefence industries in India will likely gain momentum under the rule of Defence Minister Nirmala Sitharaman, only the second woman to hold the title in the country after Indira Gandhi, and the first to hold it full-time.Indian companies like Larsen and Toubro, Tata Power, Tata Motors, Cochin Shipyard, Bharat Electronics, Reliance Defence, Ashok Leyland and Bharat Forge have been waiting for years for India’s sizeable defence capital expenditure, Economic Times reported.But despite having many home-based defence companies, India is still one of the largest importers of defence products.Global arms sales over the last five years reached their highest level since 1990, with India being the world’s largest defence importer, according to an International Peace Research Institute report. India accounted for 13 percent of global arms imports between 2012 and 2016.India’s defence technological advancement has been clearly very slow, and if there is any war, India may not be prepared for it.However, the government is now pushing for faster and better improvement in the defence sector, propelled by surging geopolitical threats — mainly from China and Pakistan. Commerce and Industry Minister Nirmala Sitharaman returns a microphone after speaking with media at the 3rd Intersessional Regional Comprehensive Economic Partnership (RCEP) Ministerial Meeting in Hanoi, Vietnam May 22, 2017.Reuters fileMany significant defence projects, such as making submarines, frigates, battlefield management systems, artillery guns and tactical communication systems, are still on hold and need to be executed sooner than later.Make in India under Nirmala Sitharaman With Nirmala Sitharaman now appointed defence minister, expectations of local defence manufacturing companies are high that activities will likely gather steam in the defence sector and boost the Make in India initiative of Prime Minister Narendra Modi.The Make in India programme was launched in 2015 to encourage national and multinational companies to manufacture their products in India.If the overall activities are fast-tracked, analysts say India’s defence outlay could reach $250 billion over the next 10 years.That means the 30 percent local sources rule that applies on defence orders alone would offer a minimum opportunity of $75 billion for domestic players.However, defence companies in India have not shown any growth and neither received any order so far despite the government’s Make in India initiative. Now, with a full-time minister appointed, the sector is expected to grow.”With the support of the Prime Minister, so many things have happened in the ministry like Start-up India, Make in India, etc. There is some misconception about Make in India, but it will be answered,” said Nirmala Sitharaman after her appointment. Close 5 little-known facts about India’s new Defence Ministercenter_img IBTimes VideoRelated VideosMore videos Play VideoPlayMute0:00/0:00Loaded: 0%0:00Progress: 0%Stream TypeLIVE0:00?Playback Rate1xChaptersChaptersDescriptionsdescriptions off, selectedSubtitlessubtitles settings, opens subtitles settings dialogsubtitles off, selectedAudio TrackFullscreenThis is a modal window.The media could not be loaded, either because the server or network failed or because the format is not supported.Beginning of dialog window. Escape will cancel and close the window.TextColorWhiteBlackRedGreenBlueYellowMagentaCyanTransparencyOpaqueSemi-TransparentBackgroundColorBlackWhiteRedGreenBlueYellowMagentaCyanTransparencyOpaqueSemi-TransparentTransparentWindowColorBlackWhiteRedGreenBlueYellowMagentaCyanTransparencyTransparentSemi-TransparentOpaqueFont Size50%75%100%125%150%175%200%300%400%Text Edge StyleNoneRaisedDepressedUniformDropshadowFont FamilyProportional Sans-SerifMonospace Sans-SerifProportional SerifMonospace SerifCasualScriptSmall CapsReset restore all settings to the default valuesDoneClose Modal DialogEnd of dialog window. COPY LINKAD Loading …last_img read more

Cassinis Saturn Mission Goes Out In A Blaze Of Glory

first_imgNASA/Joel Kowsky/(NASA/Joel Kowsky)Earl Maize (left), Cassini program manager at JPL, and Julie Webster, spacecraft operations team manager for the Cassini mission at Saturn, embrace after the Cassini spacecraft plunged into Saturn on Friday at precisely 7:55 a.m. ETUpdated at 8:15 a.m. ETControllers at NASA’s Jet Propulsion Laboratory sent a final command Friday morning to the Cassini spacecraft orbiting Saturn. Not long after, accounting for the vast distance the message traveled, the order was received, putting the craft into a suicidal swan dive in which it plummeted into the ringed planet’s atmosphere.Flight Director Julie Webster called “loss of signal” at about 7:55 a.m. ET, followed by Project Manager Earl Maize announcing “end of mission” as the spacecraft began to break up in Saturn’s atmosphere.“Congratulations to you all,” Maize announced to applause. “It’s been an incredible mission, incredible spacecraft, and you’re all an incredible team.” NASA/JPLStill from a computer-animated film depicting Cassini’s final orbits.Earth received @CassiniSaturn’s final signal at 7:55am ET. Cassini is now part of the planet it studied. Thanks for the science #GrandFinale pic.twitter.com/YfSTeeqbz1— NASA (@NASA) September 15, 2017 With Cassini running on empty and no gas station for about a billion miles, NASA decided to go out Thelma & Louise-style. But rather than careen into a canyon, the plucky probe took a final plunge into the object of its obsession.Just how obsessed? Its 13-year mission to explore the strange world of Saturn went on nearly a decade longer than planned. It completed 293 orbits of the planet, snapped 400,000 photos, collected 600 gigabytes of data, discovered at least seven new moons, descended into the famed rings and sent its Huygens lander to a successful 2005 touchdown on the surface of yet another moon, Titan.First, Cassini had to get to Saturn. The year it blasted off, 1997, the “information superhighway” was just getting up to speed. By the time it arrived, in 2004, people were fretting over what to reveal on their Facebook profiles.On its way to the sixth planet, Cassini set about a circuitous course, swinging by Venus twice to get a gravity assist that shot it back past Earth and onward to Jupiter before a final marathon leg to Saturn.The twin Voyagers swung by Saturn in the 1970s and ’80s, giving scientists a rough outline of the planet and its moons. Cassini has filled in many of the details, giving us an unparalleled look.Much of what Cassini found concerned Saturn’s moons. Among other things, the probe discovered water spewing from Enceladus, discovered that Hyperion has a statically charged surface and that Saturn’s entire moon system — a virtual mini solar system in itself — exchanges dust and chunks of material with the planet’s ring system.“Two of those moons have been of particular interest,” NPR’s Joe Palca reports from JPL headquarters in Pasadena, Calif. “Titan, with its methane lakes and Enceladus, with its geysers of salty water. Scientists speculate that both moons may have the right conditions to harbor some form of life, although Cassini did not have instruments capable of detecting life.”One of Cassini’s crowning achievements came in April of this year, as it spun through a narrow gap in Saturn’s rings, beaming back images and making scientific measurements along the way.Why end the mission? Although Cassini’s main power is supplied by radioisotope thermoelectric generators, or RTGs — essentially nuclear batteries that were still going at mission’s end — the fuel supply for the probe’s main engine and backup was believed to be running low.“We don’t have a gas gauge. It would be really nice if we did,” Molly Bittner, a systems engineer at JPL who has worked on Cassini for the past four years, tells NPR. Instead, mission controllers had to estimate the amount of fuel used by each maneuver. And there had been lots of maneuvers since 2004.NPR’s Adam Cole, who helped produce a video commemorating the spacecraft’s life and times, says: “Scientists [were] worried that when [Cassini] loses power, it could crash into a pristine moon, contaminating a place where we might someday search for life.”However, there’s another reason for ending the mission in such a spectacular fashion: “We have the opportunity to do some really cool science,” Bittner says.While Cassini has discovered a lot of interesting things about Saturn, its ring system and its moons, there’s one thing it hasn’t been able to pin down with certainty — how long a Saturnian day lasts.“It’s a little bit embarrassing to confess, but we don’t know how long a day is on Saturn,” Michele Dougherty of Imperial College in London tells NPR’s Palca. She’s the scientist in charge of Cassini’s magnetometer, an instrument that measures Saturn’s magnetic field.Dougherty is hoping that as Cassini spiraled into the atmosphere, the onboard magnetometer detected a telltale tilt in the magnetic field that should resolve the uncertainty over the length of a Saturnian day, Joe reports.Bittner says that in the final moments of Cassini’s life, another instrument, the Ion and Neutral Mass Spectrometer, or INMS, was to open up, sucking in the atmosphere to figure out what it’s made of.Copyright 2017 NPR. To see more, visit http://www.npr.org/.center_img Sharelast_img read more