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Ohio State mens soccer captures Big Ten regularseason title after 31 win

OSU sophomore forward Marcus McCrary (19) during a game against Michigan on Nov. 4 at Jesse Owens Memorial Stadium. OSU won 3-1. Credit: Laurie Hamame | Lantern PhotographerAnother title is coming to Columbus, this one by way of the Ohio State men’s soccer team, which captured the regular-season Big Ten crown on Wednesday after defeating Michigan 3-1.The Big Ten championship is the third for the program and first since 2009. Senior midfielder and captain Zach Mason said he knew this year’s team would be special.“We have a team full of winners, a winning mentality,” Mason said. “I knew something special would happen this year, and I’m glad it came to fruition.”After a rocky 1-4 start, the Buckeyes finished their regular season with an overall record of 11-5-2 and a conference record of 5-2-1. OSU coach John Bluem said the team’s turnaround is a testament to its mindset.“Even when we were 1-4, the guys didn’t lose confidence. They thought that we were a good team and that we had just been unlucky,” Bluem said. “The fact that they didn’t give up and realized that if we could just get it going, we would be fine, and obviously we did get it going.”The Buckeye seniors, who were honored prior to the game for senior night, were the stars of the night. Mason and midfielder Kyle Culbertson combined for the Scarlet and Gray’s three goals. Mason’s tally was the first of his collegiate career.“Senior night, a couple seniors getting some goals, getting a win, the Big Ten title, I mean it’s a dream come true,” Mason said. Culbertson’s first goal of the evening, and his fourth of the season, occurred at the 25th minute of the first half when the ball bounced to him off a Michigan player 12 feet in front of the net. The strike gave OSU a 1-0 lead.Shortly after, in the 32nd minute of play, a corner kick from senior defender Liam Doyle found Mason on the ground after a deflection, redirecting into the net for his first goal in scarlet and gray.“I went up for the header and I missed it. I fell down on the ball and it went in. It was worth the wait though,” Mason said. “I just started laughing instantly. It’s ironic that I never scored, and it wasn’t a good goal, but it went in.”Culbertson got his second tally of the match in the 55th minute following skillful passing by junior forwards Danny Jensen and Yaw Amankwa. The goal swelled the OSU lead to three goals.“The front four played fantastic, that last goal was just a testament to that,” Culbertson said. “I think everybody touched it, all the front four guys. It was just a great combination play.”The Buckeye defense did its part as well, keeping Michigan off the scoreboard until the 85th minute of play when senior goaltender Chris Froschauer’s bid for an eighth shutout was snapped by Wolverine senior forward James Murphy.“The performance speaks for itself, we’ve given up four goals in our past 11 games,” Bluem said. “Our defense has really been doing the job for us, they’ve been fantastic all year long and we’re playing well at the best time of the season to be playing well.”With the Big Ten regular-season title under its belt, OSU will move on to the Big Ten tournament, where it enters as the top seed. Culbertson said that despite the Big Ten title, the competition is still intense.“Every team in this conference can beat anybody out there, so we are definitely getting prepared and making sure that we know the opponent that’s coming in, and making sure we’re ready to work,” Culbertson said.Bluem said there is still a lot of soccer to be played.“We’ve got the Big Ten tournament in front of us, and it would be great to win that as well. We know that after that, we’re going to advance and play in the NCAA tournament,” he said. “This isn’t the last game of the season, there’s a lot of games left in front of you, let’s just one win at a time and do what we did tonight and if we do it well enough, we’ll win.”The Buckeyes are scheduled to host their first Big Ten tournament game Sunday against the winner of Michigan State and Penn State. Kickoff is set for 4 p.m. at Jesse Owens Memorial Stadium. read more

Opinion If Ohio State wants to win Haskins has to start in

Ohio State redshirt freshman quarterback Dwayne Haskins (7) throws a pass in the fourth quarter of the game against Michigan on Nov. 25 in Ann Arbor. Ohio State won 31-20. Credit: Jack Westerheide | Photo EditorLast season, redshirt sophomore Dwayne Haskins secured the backup quarterback position when redshirt junior quarterback Joe Burrow was temporarily sidelined with a hand injury. In that backup role, Haskins threw for 565 yards, four touchdowns and one interception, completing 70.2 percent of his passes across eight gamesWhile the numbers in his limited play aren’t gaudy by any means, Haskins made his best case for the 2018 starting job on a single drive against his team’s arch-rival. Once J.T. Barrett was forced to exit the game and Ohio State trailed 20-14, Haskins orchestrated a scoring drive that proved to be the game-winner in its 31-20 victory. Given the collectiveness he showed in the most tense moment of his football career, Haskins made a strong case for why on Sept. 1, when the when the Ohio State football team opens its season against the Oregon State Beavers, he should start at quarterback. “It’s crazy to go win the biggest rivalry in sports. I never thought it would be a reality,” Haskins said after the win. “I got my number called and it worked out for me. I’m thankful.”Worked out for him it did, most importantly in the eyes of head coach Urban Meyer.“I can’t say it’s comfort yet,” Meyer said after the game. “But to see him perform in that environment, and more importantly against that defense. That’s an elite defense.”If there’s one thing about quarterbacks that matters to Meyer, it’s big-game experience. That was evident when he began the 2015 campaign with Cardale Jones — who led his team to a national championship the year prior —, to be the Week One starter over Barrett, — who became statistically the greatest quarterback in school history.From a scheme standpoint, Meyer has almost always had a quarterback weith the ability to make plays on the ground. Haskins has the skills to extend a play at times, but in no way are his legs a threat for opposing defenses to worry about.The lack of mobility, however, might not be a detriment to his chances of becoming the starter since Ohio State will be returning two previous 1,000-yard rushers. Last season, Barrett out-carried Mike Weber or J.K. Dobbins in seven games and out-carried both combined on two occasions.With that duo behind him, the Buckeyes’ offense can become more simplified. The running backs run and the quarterback throws. And Haskins will throw well because what he lacks on the ground, he makes up for with incredible arm talent.“It would mean the world to me [to be the starter],” Haskins said following Ohio State’s Cotton Bowl victory. “I’ve been working for this since I was a little kid and it’s right there so I’m going to go take it.” read more

Report Everton keen on United defender

first_imgEverton are reportedly keen to renew their interest in Manchester United defender Chris Smalling ahead of the transfer window reopening in January.The former Fulham central defender has spent the last eight years at Old Trafford since making move to Manchester in 2010 and he has made 14 appearances in the Premier League and Champions League this season.However, Smalling is yet to pen to paper on a new contract with the Red Devils and although Manchester United have the option of extending his current deal until 2020, it appears that will not stop interest from elsewhere.harry maguire, manchester UnitedMaguire says United need to build on today’s win George Patchias – September 14, 2019 Harry Maguire wants his United teammates to build on the victory over Leicester City.During the summer, Harry Maguire was referred to as the ultimate…Reports in the English press as quoted in Sports Mole say the Toffees are keen on the signing of Smalling on a free transfer when his current deal expires.However, the Merseyside club are expected to make a move for the England center-half in January if United exercise their 12-month option, and that shows the level of desire of the club to add him to their squad.Everton manager Marco Silva who added Yerry Mina and Kurt Zouma (on loan from Chelsea) to his back line, has Michael Keane and Mason Holgate as other viable long-term options in the centre of his backline, with Phil Jagielka possibly retiring at the end of the season.last_img read more

Man hospitalized after driveby shooting in Lauderhill

first_img Copyright 2019 Sunbeam Television Corp. All rights reserved. This material may not be published, broadcast, rewritten or redistributed. LAUDERHILL, FLA. (WSVN) – Rescue crews have taken a man to the hospital after he was shot while riding in a car in Lauderhill.Lauderhill Police and Fire Rescue units responded to a shopping plaza near West Oakland Park Boulevard and Northwest 56th Avenue, at around 4:30 p.m., Saturday.According to investigators, someone inside a white Kia opened fire on a white Dodge Durango as both vehicles traveled northbound along the 2900 block of Northwest 56th Avenue.The bullets caused a flat tire, prompting the driver of the Durango to pull into the nearby shopping plaza. The three people inside the SUV then went inside an ice cream shop, where an employee noticed one of them had suffered a gunshot would to the foot. The employee then called 911.Paramedics transported the victim to Florida Medical Center in Lauderhill in stable condition. He is expected to be OK.Police are searching for an armed man who was last seen inside the Kia. He stands 6 feet tall and was last seen wearing a black shirt and black pants.If you have any information on this shooting, call Broward County Crime Stoppers at 954-493-TIPS. Remember, you can always remain anonymous, and you may be eligible for a $3,000 reward. last_img read more

Whos doing Christianity right At Taylor University Pence invitation highlig …

first_img Facebook Twitter Pinterest LinkedIn ReddIt Email Share This! Share This! Facebook Twitter Pinterest LinkedIn ReddIt Email,About the authorView All Posts Emily McFarlan Miller Emily McFarlan Miller is a national reporter for RNS based in Chicago. She covers evangelical and mainline Protestant Christianity.,Load Comments,Facebook bans ‘dangerous individuals’ cited for hate speech Trump, rabbi of attacked synagogue observe National Day of Prayer at White House By: Emily McFarlan Miller emmillerwrites Tagscommencement evangelicalism homepage featured Mike Pence Taylor University,You may also like Instagram apostasy stirs controversy over Christian ‘influencers’ August 30, 2019 News As Amazon burns, Vatican prepares for summit on region’s faith and sustainabilit … August 30, 2019 Share This! By: Emily McFarlan Miller emmillerwrites Facebook Twitter Pinterest LinkedIn ReddIt Email Photos of the Week August 30, 2019 Share This! Catholicism Share This! Facebook Twitter Pinterest LinkedIn ReddIt Email,UPLAND, Ind. (RNS) — Like most Americans, students at Taylor University have strong feelings about President Trump and his vice president, Mike Pence, as well as the relationship between religion and politics.So when news broke last month that Pence would speak at Taylor’s upcoming commencement, reactions were mixed.Some students love the decision. Some hate it.Others see the whole thing as divisive, according to students discussing the announcement in Professor Alan Blanchard’s Advanced Media Writing class April 16 at Taylor.“I think that for years we have been in a school that’s very open to conversation, and I think the last couple of months — last year — has just kind of been a battle for who’s right,” said Lexie Lake, a senior in the class.RELATED: Pence controversy at Taylor University a sign of changes coming to Christian colleges (COMMENTARY)The controversy over Pence’s visit is not the only recent disagreement at Taylor.Earlier this year, a Taylor professor started a petition against a planned Starbucks on campus because of its “stands on the sanctity of life and human sexuality.” And last year, an anonymous conservative publication popped up on campus with complaints the school had become too liberal.Like so much of evangelicalism in the United States, the Christian liberal arts school — which always has prided itself on welcoming diverse Christian perspectives — has in recent years found itself engaged in a battle for the soul of the movement.Taylor University junior Tiffany Rogers. RNS photo by Emily McFarlan Miller“It’s now pitting Christian against Christian: Who’s more Christian? Who loves God more? Who’s doing it right?” junior Tiffany Rogers said.“Who’s doing Christianity right?”Taylor University describes itself on its website as a nondenominational Christian school that “encourages students to ask hard questions” on its picturesque campus surrounded by Indiana cornfields.Its 2,000 students are required to sign a “Life Together Covenant” largely upholding a conservative evangelical view of Christianity. Among other things, the school prohibits alcohol and tobacco use, “homosexual behavior,” premarital sex and social dancing outside of school-sanctioned dances.Taylor’s approach seems popular among evangelicals. The school recently tied with Calvin College in Grand Rapids, Mich., for the No. 1 regional college in the Midwest in U.S. News and World Report’s 2019 rankings.John Fea — a professor of American history at Messiah College and author of the book “Believe Me: The Evangelical Road to Donald Trump” who spoke at Taylor in October — described the school as “warmly evangelical.”Fea said Taylor never has been known as a political place in the same way as much larger evangelical school Liberty University in Lynchburg, Va., where President Jerry Falwell Jr. is a vocal supporter of Trump. Even Wheaton College, the flagship evangelical school in Wheaton, Ill., is more political than Taylor.But schools like Taylor, which might have taken a live and let live approach to politics in the past, now may feel like they have to take sides, according to the historian.“People have always debated the meaning of what an evangelical is or what an evangelical college might look like,” he said. “But I think the election of Donald Trump certainly kind of exacerbated or enhanced these issues and put them now much more on the front of the identity agenda that Christian colleges are having to deal with.”Taylor University campus on April 16, 2019, in Upland, Ind. RNS photo by Emily McFarlan MillerA number of Christian colleges have made headlines since the 2016 election campaign for controversies stemming from conservative and progressive divides in both theology and politics. Oftentimes, their students hold more progressive views than their parents or donors.That was the case at Azusa Pacific University in Azusa, Calif., which announced in 2018 it would remove a clause from its student code of conduct that prohibited same-sex romantic relationships. Students applauded the decision, while some of the school’s board members and supporters objected. The school first reinstated its ban on same-sex relationships, then lifted that ban this spring, according to published reports.RELATED: Most evangelical college students appreciate LGBT people even if trustees don’tA week after the April 11 announcement that Pence will speak at commencement, it still dominated news on Taylor’s campus, about an hour and a half northeast of Indianapolis.Newspaper racks in campus buildings carried headlines about the controversy on the front page of The Echo, the student newspaper. And a lighthearted publication called Click Bait, published by a student group known as the Integration of Faith & Culture Cabinet, landed on tables in the student center with the satirical headline “Pence Security Team to Build Wall Around Commencement Stage.”Journalism students in an Advanced Media Writing class interact at Taylor University on April 16, 2019, in Upland, Ind. RNS photo by Emily McFarlan MillerFaculty approved a motion 61-49 dissenting to Pence’s invitation after Taylor President P. Lowell Haines announced the commencement speaker at a faculty meeting, according to an account in The Echo.Not long after an email went out from the school announcing Pence’s visit, another email landed in students’ inboxes, inviting them to three listening sessions hosted by the school where they could make their feelings heard about the choice.Lowell Haines. Photo courtesy of Taylor UniversityIn an email last week to the campus community that was provided to Religion News Service, Haines said that when he was presented with the opportunity to have Pence speak at the school’s commencement, he pursued it with “the best of intentions.”He acknowledged some have been offended by the selection and said the school is working with faculty, staff and student leaders to make sure the May 18 commencement ceremony honors everyone in attendance — including the vice president.“I pray that over time, we will be able to overcome this current, deeply emotional challenge in a manner that reflects God’s desire that we show love and grace when confronted with conflict in life,” he wrote in his message addressed to the “Taylor Family.”“We have always been a community that, while deeply and firmly grounded in our Christian faith, celebrates what is unique about each individual and encourages diversity of thought and personhood,” Haines said.Haines did not respond to requests for an interview by RNS.The school has heard feedback from people both supportive of and opposed to its decision to invite Pence, according to James R. Garringer, Taylor’s director of media relations.“Taylor University is an intentional Christian community that strives to encourage positive, respectful and meaningful dialogue. We look forward to hosting the Vice President next month,” Garringer said in a written statement to RNS.Professor Jim Spiegel, who teaches philosophy and religion at Taylor, authored the petition against Starbucks’ coming to Taylor and said he was one of the authors of the anonymous conservative newsletter.He said the headlines recent controversies have drawn are “certainly new and somewhat surprising for Taylor.”“We don’t have a significant history of being politically vocal and active,” he said.Taylor University sophomore Sam Jones. RNS photo by Emily McFarlan MillerSam Jones — a sophomore at Taylor who grew up in a conservative, nondenominational Christian family in Wheaton, Ill., and now attends a charismatic church near the school — is looking forward to Pence’s visit.Jones said he and his roommate started a Change.org petition supporting Pence as commencement speaker.As of Thursday (May 2), more than 5,900 people had signed onto their petition, which argued that people in positions of power should be respected and welcomed on campus and that the university wasn’t aligning itself with Pence by inviting him, but rather “simply giving a voice to all opinions and planes of thought.”A petition protesting Pence’s appearance, also hosted on Change.org, has gathered more than 7,200 signatures.“Inviting Vice President Pence to Taylor University and giving him a coveted platform for his political views makes our alumni, faculty, staff and current students complicit in the Trump-Pence Administration’s policies, which we believe are not consistent with the Christian ethic of love we hold dear,” reads the petition, which was started by a 2007 Taylor graduate.If Democrat Joe Biden were invited to speak at commencement when he was vice president, Jones told RNS, he’d be just as excited.“For Taylor to have that opportunity — a school of 2,000 kids in the middle of a cornfield — is incredible,” he said.In the two years Jones has been at Taylor, he said, political conversations have often become tense and divisive.“I think, as a university, this is the place where you need to have all sorts of different opinions because people are here to learn,” he said. “We’re not here because we have everything figured out. We’re here to learn new things from new people.”Rogers, the junior, also agrees that it is important to listen to all the voices on campus. And she wishes she could be excited about the sitting vice president visiting her school, too, she said.But Rogers — who is from Fort Lauderdale, Fla., and attends an Episcopal church near the school — said she has a hard time squaring Pence’s stances toward LGBTQ rights with Christianity’s call to love. She worries about the message his appearance sends to students and their families coming to commencement from outside the U.S., given the Trump administration’s stances on immigration and refugee admissions.She pointed to a statement by Haines in the school’s announcement that suggests to her Taylor’s invitation indicates support for Pence and his policies: “Mr. Pence has been a good friend to the University over many years, and is a Christian brother whose life and values have exemplified what we strive to instill in our graduates.”Inviting Pence seems out of character for the university she’s grown to love, said Rogers.“Taylor has never really taken a stance on politics, and we’re a nondenominational school so we don’t even take a stance on a denomination,” she said.“So this is just them very clearly stating what they believe and what they’re for, which has never really been said before. I think a lot of people are taken aback by that.”Professor Alan Blanchard teaches a journalism class at Taylor University on April 16, 2019, in Upland, Ind. RNS photo by Emily McFarlan MillerBlanchard, who teaches journalism at Taylor, said the controversy on campus is a “teachable moment.”At the faculty meeting discussing Pence’s invitation, Blanchard said he argued that administrators, faculty and students should allow people to speak at the school with whom they disagree a little — or a lot. They should be able to talk about those things on which they disagree and still, at the end of the day, “honor God’s two greatest commandments: Love God with all your heart and love your neighbor as yourself.”He’s discussed the upcoming commencement speech with all his journalism classes — even asking them to write letters to the editor about their feelings about the vice president’s visit.“I think — not just for journalism students or professional journalists — I think we all benefit when we listen to people with different viewpoints and different ideas,” he said. News • Photos of the Week Emily McFarlan Miller emmillerwrites By: Emily McFarlan Miller emmillerwrites Facebook Twitter Pinterest LinkedIn ReddIt Emaillast_img read more

Facebooks Portal Smart Display Gets ABC News CNN Web Browser Instant Games

first_imgFacebook is expanding the content available to users of is Portal smart display slash video calling device: The company is bringing news content from ABC News and CNN to the device, which can now also be used to browse the web.The launch of a new web browser to Portal will enable users to visit their favorite sites, check out recipes, and even play videos from YouTube. Facebook is also adding its web-based casual Instant Games to the device, allowing users to play “Words with Friends,” “Draw Something,” “Sudoku” and a handful of other titles.Facebook launched Portal in October with an emphasis on video calling: The device, which is available with two screen sizes, comes with an integrated smart camera that automatically focuses on users as they move through the room — something that is supposed to enable more natural video calls. But from day one, Facebook also added apps from a number of content partners, including Food Network, Spotify, Pandora, iHeartRadio and Newsy. The company also tightly integrated Portal with its own Facebook Watch video service.With Friday’s additions, Portal users will be able to consume additional news content, and also have access to CNN’s Great Big Story video offering. And the company also added a few more video calling features, including additional AR effects. ×Actors Reveal Their Favorite Disney PrincessesSeveral actors, like Daisy Ridley, Awkwafina, Jeff Goldblum and Gina Rodriguez, reveal their favorite Disney princesses. Rapunzel, Mulan, Ariel,Tiana, Sleeping Beauty and Jasmine all got some love from the Disney stars.More VideosVolume 0%Press shift question mark to access a list of keyboard shortcutsKeyboard Shortcutsplay/pauseincrease volumedecrease volumeseek forwardsseek backwardstoggle captionstoggle fullscreenmute/unmuteseek to %SPACE↑↓→←cfm0-9Next UpJennifer Lopez Shares How She Became a Mogul04:350.5x1x1.25×1.5x2xLive00:0002:1502:15center_img Popular on Variety last_img read more

October 28 2015Claire Carter from the Scottsdale

first_imgOctober 28, 2015Claire Carter from the Scottsdale Museum of Contemporary Art SMOCA is visiting the Soleri Archives to explore materials for the 2017 exhibition. The planned exhibition is the third of a series of three Soleri exhibitions at the Smoca.The 2010 exhibition BRIDGES: SPANNING THE IDEAS OF PAOLO SOLERI ran from October 8. 2010 until January 23. 2011. You can see reports of this exhibition with the following link 1, link 2, link 3.[photo and text  by Sue Kirsch]In the photo are Archive Director Tomiaki Tamura, Jonathon Keats, Larry Busbea and Claire Carter.The opening of the 2010 exhibition was part of the opening and celebration of the Soleri Pedestrian Bridge and Plaza at the Waterfront in downtown Scottsdale. You can see reports of this exhibition with the following link 1, link 2, link 3.The 2013 exhibition SOLERI: MESA CITY TO ARCOSANTI was from January 26 – April 28, 2013. You can see reports of this exhibition with the following link 1, link 2, link 3.Claire Carter was the curator for the previous exhibitions and is now preparing for 2017. Hopes are that after 2017 there might be a traveling exhibit, possibly with ‘Best of all three Exhibits”. Claire brought scholar and author Jonathon Keats, and Associate Professor of Art History Larry Busbea from University of Arizona, School of Art, in Tucson. Jonathan and Larry have been selected to write the exhibition catalog for the Soleri series at the Smoca.last_img read more