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Photo: Check Out This Michigan Fan’s Incredible Charles Woodson Tattoo

first_imgFans watch a Michigan Wolverines flag after a score against the Illinois Fighting Illini.ANN ARBOR, MI – OCTOBER 22: Fans watch a Michigan Wolverines flag after a score against the Illinois Fighting Illini on October 22, 2016 at Michigan Stadium in Ann Arbor, Michigan. (Photo by Gregory Shamus/Getty Images) *** Local Caption ***The image of Charles Woodson walking off the Michigan Stadium field with a rose in between his teeth following the Wolverines’ victory against Ohio State is an iconic one for those associated with the program. One Michigan fan has gotten said image tattooed on their body. Check out this incredible piece of art a Wolverines’ fan recently had done: First tattoo is done. #GoBlue. 〽️ pic.twitter.com/pFwAweC8zt— Honey Breezy (@BHugh_215) March 1, 2015Woodson, the 1997 Heisman Trophy winner, helped Michigan win the Rose Bowl and a share of the national championship that season.last_img read more

Classaction lawsuit filed over Marriott data breach

first_imgGREENBELT, Md. — A group of class-action law firms has filed the largest-to-date lawsuit related to hotel chain Marriott’s data breach.The Daily Record reports that Marriott International Inc. is being sued by 176 plaintiffs from all 50 states, the District of Columbia, Puerto Rico and the U.S. Virgin Islands in federal court. The world’s largest hotel chain confirmed late last year that hackers compiled stolen data from reservation systems used by Starwood Hotels and Resorts Worldwide Inc. for four years.Marriott said last week that around 383 million guests were affected.The plaintiffs assert Starwood and Marriott failed to identify the breach and notify those affected in a timely manner. Plaintiffs’ attorneys say Marriott should have discovered the breach during its acquisition of Starwood in 2016.The report didn’t include a response from Marriott.___Information from: The Daily Record of Baltimore, http://www.thedailyrecord.comThe Associated Presslast_img read more

200k spent in August petroleum land rights sale

first_imgFORT ST. JOHN, B.C. – After the provincial government only netted $27,000 during last month’s petroleum and natural gas land rights sale, August’s wasn’t much better.In Wednesday’s auction, the provincial government netted just $201,872.37 from the sale of a single drilling license, which was one of only three parcels of land on the auction block. The 777-hectare parcel is located near Montney, just north of Fort St. John. Stomp Energy Ltd. purchased the parcel for $259.81 per hectare.So far this year, petroleum land rights auctions have brought in just $59,670,245.38. That number, while still more than the roughly $33.6 million paid for land rights in 2015 and 2016 combined, is still well below the $173 million the Province earned last year. The next petroleum land rights sale is taking place on September 12th, when four drilling licenses and two leases will be put up for auction.last_img read more

Now KMC will be responsible for upkeep of Citizens Park

first_imgKolkata: Kolkata Municipal Corporation (KMC) is taking over the maintenance of Citizens’ Park, popularly known as Mohor Kunja, situated on Cathedral Road beside Victoria Memorial.The decision has been approved at the Member, Mayor-in-Councils’ (MMiC) meeting that was chaired by Mayor Firhad Hakim on Saturday. Reliance Industries that had taken over the maintenance of the park in 2015, had written to the KMC a few days ago, expressing its unwillingness to carry on with the park’s maintenance. Also Read – Centuries-old Durga Pujas continue to be hit among revellers”We are taking over the maintenance of Citizen’s Park as the private company associated with its maintenance is no longer willing to continue its upkeep,” said Debasish Kumar, MMiC (Parks & Gardens). It may be mentioned that Reliance Industries had taken over the park’s maintenance in 2015 and was supposed to maintain the urban park for five years. The civic body had made it clear that they will not be able to do any commercial venture out of the park. Also Read – Bengal family worships Muslim girl as Goddess Durga in Kumari PujaHowever, the company wrote to the Director General of the Parks & Garden department of the civic body, expressing its willingness to move out of the contract. When asked about the reason behind Reliance opting out of the contract, Kumar refused to comment. The park, which had started its journey in 2005, was one of the most vaunted projects of the erstwhile Trinamool Congress board, with Subrata Mukherjee as the Mayor. It was named as Citizens Park.last_img read more

Every detail will count

first_imgThe Lok Sabha elections are barely a month away and camps of all political outfits are buzzing. Amidst their carefully crafted strategies and populist manifestos lie the issues that will play a pivotal role in steering their ships to shore. The most-preferred choice in a public mandate is the one which understands the ground situation more than anything. The need of the hour is to understand the prevailing situation. While the incumbent bears the responsibility of addressing grievances, others are free to either suggest or criticise – latter being the case most of the times. In the democratic set-up constituted and passed down to the future generations, the concept of opposition was to sit with the government and contribute to the discussions over decisions to be made in the interest of people or nation as a whole. It was certainly not to create an ugly environment by dissenting to the point of humiliating the incumbent over their decision. Maybe that is why the heavily advocated concept of a majority government by BJP is crucial to their vision of India. As evident, the 16th Lok Sabha never had any troubles over decisions simply because of a staggering 282 seats that it had in the 2014 elections. Such a majority gave BJP the power it may not have speculated. The Modi wave reduced Congress to scrap – mere 44 seats in a historic low. Congress has since walked a long way in recovering from such a disaster to be able to once again become the reckoning force it was prior to the Modi wave. Led by yet another Gandhi, Congress’ recent victory in the major states was the first glimpse of the grand old party’s resurgence. But why was Congress able to sideline BJP in the three states of Rajasthan, MP and Chhattisgarh? The answer to this question holds the key to understanding the upcoming elections. Also Read – A compounding difficultyThe ever-dominant Modi wave is still there but BJP lost the three states to their bitter rivals purely on the ground issues. It seemed as if the saffron party’s time at the helm made it accustomed to their wishes more than the public’s. Demonetisation had already hurt the rural population immeasurably. Adding higher MSP’s and poorly implemented farm schemes after a tumultuous outcry of the same did not exactly help. Farmers resort to suicides as the debts grew and grievances were seldom addressed. The compounding distress came back to haunt BJP in the most crucial hour – elections. Understanding this bit of an unaddressed issue transforming into a decisive factor in the public mandate is necessary to draw predictions about the upcoming polls. Though the aforementioned instance was just for the three states – which had agrarian distress as the predominant issue, it is a collective of issues across the verticles of society that will decide who gets to the helm. Each state has its own set of issues, adversities to be precise, that need to be resolved. These did not emerge overnight, they have come to the forefront based on neglect of the government. Take for instance Kerala’s Sabarimala imbroglio or Northeast’s agitation against the Citizenship Amendment Bill. Both the regions are embroiled in their respective controversies which, on several occasions, has brought the state to an uncomfortable halt. BJP and Congress have done little to resolve the adversities. In such a situation, regional parties have become the popular choice – making them a key factor in the national narrative. The third front or the federal front which will have to align towards either side to give the general mandate an outcome, should BJP fail to register majority, has become an essential feature of the polls. Of course, BJP is trying to avoid such a circumstance where its claim to the driving seat rests on other’s allegiance while Congress acknowledges their presence and hopeful alliance as the only way to usurp BJP. While half the country suffers from agrarian distress, there are several other state-specific issues such as militancy in J&K, drug abuse in Punjab, unemployment in UP, Jat reservation/agitation in Haryana, et al. Now, while the populist manifestos will certainly highlight these and influence public mandate through sops of all sorts, the voters’ dilemma exists nevertheless since deep down none will cater to the troubles with the eye of resolving them in entirety. If you solve the problem then there is no problem to build your promises on. In such a case, the next best thing is to vote the one with fewer lies or the one who understands the regional issues more. In this context, the narrative of polls might meander depending on the regional powerplay!last_img read more

896 lakh jobs created in Jan 7648 lakh in last 17 months

first_imgNew Delhi: Net employment generation in the formal sector touched a 17-month high of 8.96 lakh in January, according to the latest EPFO payroll data. The EPFO has been releasing payroll data from April 2018, covering the period starting September 2017. The addition in January was 131 per cent higher as compared with 3.87 lakh EPFO subscribers added in the year-ago month. In September 2017, a net of 2,75,609 jobs were created. Around 76.48 lakh new subscribers were added to social security schemes of the Employees’ Provident Fund Organisation (EPFO) from September 2017 to January 2019, the data showed. This indicates that these many jobs were created in the formal sector over the past 17 months. Also Read – Uddhav bats for ‘Sena CM’ The net EPFO enrolment in January 2019 stood at 8,96,516, which is the highest since September 2017. The EPFO, however, revised slightly downwards its payroll data for December 2018 by 1.8 per cent to 7.03 lakh, against the earlier estimate of 7.16 lakh released last month. It also revised the cumulative job addition data for the September 2017-December 2018 period downwards 6.6 per cent to 67.52 lakh, from the earlier forecast of 72.32 lakh. Also Read – Farooq demands unconditional release of all detainees in J&K The sharpest revision was for March 2018 in the latest report which showed contraction or exit of 29,023 members from the EPFO subscriptions whereas last month’s estimated addition of 5,498 members. The EPFO data showed that the March 2018 figure is negative due to large number of exits reported in March, in view of it being the closing month of the financial year. During January 2019, the highest number of 2.44 lakh jobs were created in the 22-25 years age group, followed by 2.24 lakh in the 18-21 years age bracket. The data of the exited members is based on the claims submitted by the individuals and establishments and the exit data uploaded by employers, whereas the number of new subscribers is based on the Universal Account Number (UAN) generated in the system and those who have received non-zero subscription. The EPFO said the data is provisional as updation of employee records is a continuous process and gets updated in subsequent months. This is age-band wise data of new members registered under the EPFO where the first non-zero contribution received during particular month. For each age-wise band, the estimates are net of the members newly enrolled, exited and rejoined during the month as per records of the EPFO, it added. The estimates may include temporary employees whose contributions may not be continuous for the entire year. Members’ data are linked to unique Aadhaar Identity, it added. The EPFO manages social security funds of workers in the organised/semi organised sector in India and has more than 6 crore active members (with at least one-month contribution during the year).last_img read more

Holding up the mirror

first_imgI write today to discuss Down To Earth’s 28th anniversary — our dream dare that we can use our pen, our research and information, to make a difference in our world. Down To Earth is not a magazine to make money — then or now. It was, and is, not a produce of commerce; or a product of the market. It was and will remain our means to bring you information about the world around us, about everyday life and of life itself, so that we have the knowledge, which gives us power to make change. Our mission is not hidden in reams of corporate gloss. It is open. It is our dare. Also Read – A special kind of bondThe question, I want to discuss with you is my understanding of our relevance in today’s India; in today’s world. It is a cynic’s world today, where we are seeing as never before the race to the bottom. Countries are showing us their worst sides; leaders are turning into venomous creatures out to polarise people. Real issues are getting lost in the dust and fifth of this virulent discourse, where everybody — all of us — seem “free” only to the extent that we can spill out our vile guts in the now not-so-open social media. There is no societal decorum that puts lines around what can be said in public and what not. Also Read – Insider threat managementSo, have we failed? Should we continue hoping against hope that we can make a difference to public opinion? Can we really keep the focus on the real issues that matter? I believe we must. I also believe that whatever we are seeing in our world today, it is our duty, our job — if you want to call it that — to keep pushing the envelope so that this whimper of real news becomes a scream.I say this particularly as India is in the middle of the Lok Sabha elections. In this 28th anniversary year of Down To Earth, we will get a new government, or we will get the old government as new. Whatever the future, the fact is that we must be there to report on issues that concern our today and tomorrow. In this election, we have seen that the real issues that matter to people — climate change that is driving weird weather to destroy crops; insurance companies that do not provide relief to farmers to cope with this distress; produce that is not getting value to pay for labour of farmers; pollution that is destroying livelihoods and health; and worse, the drought that is crippling large parts of the country — are all out of the frame. Nothing real seems to get our attention anymore. These are not eyeball issues. Social media misses these trends. Politicians today want us to believe that they can afford to forget local issues — issues that matter to their constituents — and still win elections. Elections then are about poisoned words and polarised politics. But I believe — and I hope you will as well — that these issues that I have enumerated will not go away. They cannot be swallowed up or spit out. They are real. They matter. It is our job to bring this news out and to keep working till this news that has been shuttered to the margins, becomes the main. It must. Because it matters to you and to me. It matters to our future. No government likes to be shown a mirror to its failures; no government wants to hear the inconvenient news that its spin doctors want us to believe. But it will remain our job to hold that mirror. And we will do this with all our ability to tell it from the ground; tell it as it happens; tell it truthfully. We do not need courage to do this. We need to make sure that we do not slip and lose your trust. Our mission is to make a difference; our shield is our independence. We will not let you down. I promise. We promise. (The author is Director General of Centre for Science and Environment and the Editor of Down To Earth magazine. The views expressed are strictly personal)last_img read more

ITC to expand dairy beverages portfolio

first_imgMumbai: Tobaccos-to-hotels major ITC is planning to expand its dairy beverages portfolio to the rest of the country by the next summer and is eyeing a 5-10 percent market share in the first year of operations. ITC’s food division already offers fruits-based beverages for the past four five years and also dairy-based beverages which have been soft-launched in the South last December. The company entered the ready-to-drink milk-based beverages market with the launch of Sunfeast Wonderz Milk last December. The milkshake market is around Rs 1,000 crore. Also Read – Commercial vehicle sales to remain subdued in current fiscal: Icra”We would be extending our dairy beverage business and will be launching across the country by the next summer. We expect to clock 5-10 percent of the Rs 1,000-crore market in the first year of operations,” Sanjay Singal, chief operating officer for dairy and beverages unit at ITC said here. Kolkata-based company is also planning to export its dry fruits-based dairy beverages badam milkshake to Dubai and Saudi Arabia. The company had also rolled out packaged milk and curds under its Aashirvaad brand in Kolkata and Bihar. Also Read – Ashok Leyland stock tanks over 5 pc as co plans to suspend production for up to 15 daysSingal said the company would focus only in the Eastern markets for the packaged milk business in the foreseeable future, where there is less competition. ITC Friday launched three fruit beverages under its B Natural brand in PET bottles. It currently sells nine flavours of fruit juices in tetra packs and has a market share of 9-10 percent in the Rs 2,000-crore fruit beverages segment. Singal also said within a month, it will launch vegetable juices and is evaluating opportunities in the water segment.last_img read more

Ohio State mens soccer captures Big Ten regularseason title after 31 win

OSU sophomore forward Marcus McCrary (19) during a game against Michigan on Nov. 4 at Jesse Owens Memorial Stadium. OSU won 3-1. Credit: Laurie Hamame | Lantern PhotographerAnother title is coming to Columbus, this one by way of the Ohio State men’s soccer team, which captured the regular-season Big Ten crown on Wednesday after defeating Michigan 3-1.The Big Ten championship is the third for the program and first since 2009. Senior midfielder and captain Zach Mason said he knew this year’s team would be special.“We have a team full of winners, a winning mentality,” Mason said. “I knew something special would happen this year, and I’m glad it came to fruition.”After a rocky 1-4 start, the Buckeyes finished their regular season with an overall record of 11-5-2 and a conference record of 5-2-1. OSU coach John Bluem said the team’s turnaround is a testament to its mindset.“Even when we were 1-4, the guys didn’t lose confidence. They thought that we were a good team and that we had just been unlucky,” Bluem said. “The fact that they didn’t give up and realized that if we could just get it going, we would be fine, and obviously we did get it going.”The Buckeye seniors, who were honored prior to the game for senior night, were the stars of the night. Mason and midfielder Kyle Culbertson combined for the Scarlet and Gray’s three goals. Mason’s tally was the first of his collegiate career.“Senior night, a couple seniors getting some goals, getting a win, the Big Ten title, I mean it’s a dream come true,” Mason said. Culbertson’s first goal of the evening, and his fourth of the season, occurred at the 25th minute of the first half when the ball bounced to him off a Michigan player 12 feet in front of the net. The strike gave OSU a 1-0 lead.Shortly after, in the 32nd minute of play, a corner kick from senior defender Liam Doyle found Mason on the ground after a deflection, redirecting into the net for his first goal in scarlet and gray.“I went up for the header and I missed it. I fell down on the ball and it went in. It was worth the wait though,” Mason said. “I just started laughing instantly. It’s ironic that I never scored, and it wasn’t a good goal, but it went in.”Culbertson got his second tally of the match in the 55th minute following skillful passing by junior forwards Danny Jensen and Yaw Amankwa. The goal swelled the OSU lead to three goals.“The front four played fantastic, that last goal was just a testament to that,” Culbertson said. “I think everybody touched it, all the front four guys. It was just a great combination play.”The Buckeye defense did its part as well, keeping Michigan off the scoreboard until the 85th minute of play when senior goaltender Chris Froschauer’s bid for an eighth shutout was snapped by Wolverine senior forward James Murphy.“The performance speaks for itself, we’ve given up four goals in our past 11 games,” Bluem said. “Our defense has really been doing the job for us, they’ve been fantastic all year long and we’re playing well at the best time of the season to be playing well.”With the Big Ten regular-season title under its belt, OSU will move on to the Big Ten tournament, where it enters as the top seed. Culbertson said that despite the Big Ten title, the competition is still intense.“Every team in this conference can beat anybody out there, so we are definitely getting prepared and making sure that we know the opponent that’s coming in, and making sure we’re ready to work,” Culbertson said.Bluem said there is still a lot of soccer to be played.“We’ve got the Big Ten tournament in front of us, and it would be great to win that as well. We know that after that, we’re going to advance and play in the NCAA tournament,” he said. “This isn’t the last game of the season, there’s a lot of games left in front of you, let’s just one win at a time and do what we did tonight and if we do it well enough, we’ll win.”The Buckeyes are scheduled to host their first Big Ten tournament game Sunday against the winner of Michigan State and Penn State. Kickoff is set for 4 p.m. at Jesse Owens Memorial Stadium. read more

Ohio State baseball set for midweek home contests against Akron and Xavier

Junior pitcher Ryan Riga (44) throws the ball during a game against Siena March 14 at Bill Davis Stadium. OSU won, 8-5.Credit: Sam Harrington / Lantern photographerAfter sweeping a winless Siena team over the weekend, the Ohio State baseball team is looking to continue defending its home turf.The Buckeyes (11-6, 0-0) are preparing for their last two non-conference games — against in-state opponents Akron Tuesday and Xavier Wednesday — before kicking off their Big Ten schedule with a weekend series against Michigan State.Senior outfielder Tim Wetzel, who is hitting .417 (10-24) with runners on base, said the team is concentrated on taking things one game at a time.“One thing that is big with this year’s team is we’re just treating every game the same, whether it’s the Big Ten or a midweek game like we’ve got coming up this week. Every game is just as important as the next,” Wetzel said. “We’re not going to jump ahead to the Big Ten this weekend. We’ve got to take care of these two games first.”Coach Greg Beals said he expects his players to bring a lot of energy into both of their games this week.“I just want to see us keep the winning streak going, I want to see the quality of at-bats continue to grow, I’d like to see us hit some extra base hits. If we get some extra base hits, we usually score runs in those innings,” Beals said.Sophomore pitcher Jake Post is slated to start the game against the Zips (7-8, 0-0). After two starts and also coming out of the bullpen as a relief pitcher twice, Post is currently 2-1 with a 1.80 ERA and said he is confident heading into the game against Akron.“They look like a beatable team. If I execute my pitches and our hitters come through and we play good defense, we’ll come out with a win,” Post said. “I just want to go as deep as I can, have a good game, throw good pitches and execute to put the team in a good situation to win.”Numerous freshmen have emerged as key players for the Buckeyes in the early season. The Big Ten announced Monday that freshman pitcher Travis Lakins earned Big Ten Freshman of the Week honors. Lakins recorded a perfect 1.2 innings pitched in the latter game of a doubleheader with Siena Saturday after striking out a career-high five hitters and only allowing a pair of hits in 3.2 scoreless innings at No. 7 Oregon State Tuesday.Other freshmen producing for OSU include outfielder Ronnie Dawson, who is currently third in the Big Ten with a .393 batting average and leads the team with 22 hits. Freshman pitcher Adam Niemeyer struck out a career-best eight while allowing just one hit over 4.1 scoreless innings of relief against No. 9 Oregon March 7.“They’re huge, we knew that we were going to need them coming into the season big time,” Wetzel said. “The (freshmen) pitching staff has really been stepping up, (Troy) Montgomery and Dawson in the lineup have been huge, we knew that was going to be the case. We’re just excited they’re producing.”Beals said a key to succeeding in the conference is getting the younger players as much playing time as possible.“I think we’ve been able to get production from the younger guys but most importantly, we’ve got them experience and they’ve gotten a good number of at bats, so they’re going to be ready to go now that we start conference play,” Beals said.Beals added that OSU is healthy and ready to make an impact in the Big Ten when the conference portion of its schedule begins this weekend.“Physically, we’re in really good shape so as you transfer from preseason into the conference season, that’s something that’s always a concern and we’re healthy right now,” Beals said.First pitch against Akron is set for 5:05 p.m. Tuesday at Bill Davis Stadium. read more

Opinion If Ohio State wants to win Haskins has to start in

Ohio State redshirt freshman quarterback Dwayne Haskins (7) throws a pass in the fourth quarter of the game against Michigan on Nov. 25 in Ann Arbor. Ohio State won 31-20. Credit: Jack Westerheide | Photo EditorLast season, redshirt sophomore Dwayne Haskins secured the backup quarterback position when redshirt junior quarterback Joe Burrow was temporarily sidelined with a hand injury. In that backup role, Haskins threw for 565 yards, four touchdowns and one interception, completing 70.2 percent of his passes across eight gamesWhile the numbers in his limited play aren’t gaudy by any means, Haskins made his best case for the 2018 starting job on a single drive against his team’s arch-rival. Once J.T. Barrett was forced to exit the game and Ohio State trailed 20-14, Haskins orchestrated a scoring drive that proved to be the game-winner in its 31-20 victory. Given the collectiveness he showed in the most tense moment of his football career, Haskins made a strong case for why on Sept. 1, when the when the Ohio State football team opens its season against the Oregon State Beavers, he should start at quarterback. “It’s crazy to go win the biggest rivalry in sports. I never thought it would be a reality,” Haskins said after the win. “I got my number called and it worked out for me. I’m thankful.”Worked out for him it did, most importantly in the eyes of head coach Urban Meyer.“I can’t say it’s comfort yet,” Meyer said after the game. “But to see him perform in that environment, and more importantly against that defense. That’s an elite defense.”If there’s one thing about quarterbacks that matters to Meyer, it’s big-game experience. That was evident when he began the 2015 campaign with Cardale Jones — who led his team to a national championship the year prior —, to be the Week One starter over Barrett, — who became statistically the greatest quarterback in school history.From a scheme standpoint, Meyer has almost always had a quarterback weith the ability to make plays on the ground. Haskins has the skills to extend a play at times, but in no way are his legs a threat for opposing defenses to worry about.The lack of mobility, however, might not be a detriment to his chances of becoming the starter since Ohio State will be returning two previous 1,000-yard rushers. Last season, Barrett out-carried Mike Weber or J.K. Dobbins in seven games and out-carried both combined on two occasions.With that duo behind him, the Buckeyes’ offense can become more simplified. The running backs run and the quarterback throws. And Haskins will throw well because what he lacks on the ground, he makes up for with incredible arm talent.“It would mean the world to me [to be the starter],” Haskins said following Ohio State’s Cotton Bowl victory. “I’ve been working for this since I was a little kid and it’s right there so I’m going to go take it.” read more

Where Six Execs Will Be Spending in 2017

first_img Click through the slide show to learn where six executives will be focusing their investments in 2017. Prev1 of 7NextUse your ← → (arrow) keys to browse The disruptive shifts in the media business model over the last decade offer great promise for future growth, but it’s no surprise that they also generated upheaval and uncertainty, and that they require rapid adaptation. In this environment, new technologies, new media formats, and new distribution channels emerge, and sometimes disappear within a few years. All this makes it challenging to know where to invest. Unifed databases have become much more important, as publishers seek to improve knowledge about their audiences, and then use that knowledge both for their own products, and to sell insights to their advertisers. Selling insights and marketing services to advertisers requires new skills and new staffing patterns. New opportunities to monetize content have emerged in mobile platforms, in video, in archives, and more. With budgets tight and the need for technological expertise increasing, we asked executives across the industry where they’re spending in 2017. Prev1 of 7NextUse your ← → (arrow) keys to browselast_img read more

Texas Monthly Exec Editor Splits for National Mags People on the Move

first_img Clifton Leaf has been named editor-in-chief of Fortune. Formerly deputy editor, Leaf replaces Alan Murray, who will take on the title of president, while continuing in his role as chief content officer for the entirety of Time Inc. Adam Lashinsky has also been promoted to executive editor. Keith R. Hernandez has joined Bleacher Report as SVP of brand strategy. Hernandez was president of Slate Media until November. It also solidifies speculation that tomorrow’s Texas Monthly will look remarkably different than the Texas Monthly of yore. Colloff’s departure follows the resignation of EIC Brian Sweany, who voluntarily left following the magazine’s sale to Paul Hobby. The New Yorker poetry editor Paul Muldoon will step down in the fall. He will be replaced by Kevin Young on November 1. Colloff’s role marks a major shift — not just for her career, but for all three entities affected by her employment. It’s a first-of-its-kind arrangement for The New York Times Magazine and ProPublica, which will share Colloff’s reporting between the two media entities. Christina Amoroso has been named executive features editor of Cosmopolitan.com. She joins from the New York Post, where she worked as deputy features editor.center_img Pamela Colloff has left her post as executive editor of Texas Monthly, after twenty years and an entire career spent at the magazine. She joins The New York Times Magazine and ProPublica as a writer-at-large and senior reporter, respectively. New York Magazine has promoted Rebecca Ramsey to fashion director, from her role as style director of the magazine’s fashion vertical, the Cut. Ramsey replaces Amy Larocca, who assumes the title of editor-at-large. Here are the rest of this week’s people on the move… Bustle has hired Erica Tremblay as video director from her role as director of video development at Hearst Digital Media.last_img read more

Faruq spreads literacy in remote villages

first_imgFaruq Hossain. Photo: Prothom Alo“I won’t spend excesively or buy expensive clothes. I’ll spend one fourth of my salary on education for children of poor families.” Armed with this oath, 32-year-old Faruq Hossain has been working in a remote area of Dinajpur sadar upazila for the last 10 years.Faruq is from Malipukur village in Auliapur union of Dinajpur sadar upazila. He is an assistant to a truck driver of Bangladesh Agricultural Development Corporation (BADC).He spends 25 per cent of his monthly salary of Tk 14,900 for the education of poor people’s children. He takes care of his four-member family, comprising himself, his mother Sanwara Begum, wife Sabera Akhter and two-and-a-half-year-old son Sabbir Hossain with rest of the money.Faruq distributes education material among the students every Friday and Saturday. He also has set up a centre for educating adults at his house.In recognition of his initiatives, Faruq was awarded by the prime minister Sheikh Hasina on 13 March this year.The Malipukur village is 4.5 kilometres away off Dinajpur sadar upazila. On 10 February, the Prothom Alo correspondents visited Faruq’s home. He lives in a dilapidated mud-house. Relatives said Faruq’s father Mahbub Hossain passed away in 2006. He was a labourer at BADC. Faruq also joined as a labourer at BADC in 2002.All the labourers used to draw their wages with thumbprints as they were not literate and could not sign their names. Faruq studied up to the eighth grade. He started educating his fellow workers so that everyone would be able to sign their names to draw their wages.Saving his pocket-money along with some taken from his father, Faruq bought 200 taka worth of pens and papers for the labourers. Gradually he imparted basic literacy to all of them. Delighted, a driver Naresh Chandra taught Faruq how to drive. Faruq then joined as a temporary driver at the office of the deputy director of BADC in Rajshahi in 2007. Later on 16 July that year, he was appointed as an assistant to the truck driver and transferred to Rangpur BADC office. Since then, he is working as a driver of BADC joint director (seed processing centre) AFM Saiful Islam.Unlike others, Faruq did not stop there. “I had a dream to be self-sufficient after completing my studies. But poverty cut my dreams short when I was an eighth grader at Cheradangi High School. That’s why I decided to help those who could not continue studying due to poverty,” said Faruq to Prothom Alo.Faruq said the studies of Nur Islam from Kashimpur Mahanpara village came to a halt due to lack of education material and proper clothes in July 2008. He went to Nur Islam’s home and gave his mother 3000 taka. Nur Islam is now a student at Dinajpur Government College.In December that year, Faruq held a meeting with the seniors of the village. He told them he would not eat paan (betel leaf), smole cigarettes or buy expensive clothes. Instead he will help students from poor families. In 2009, he bought education material and clothes for 20 students with 25 per cent of his salary and admitted them to school. As of now, Faruq said, he has helped almost 2,000 students of the union.Ninth grader Zahid Hossain, eighth grader Amena and seventh grader Abdus Sattar at Cheradangi High School are some of the students from poor families who received Faruq’s help.When Sima Akhter from Malipukur village was a fifth grader, her father Samirul Islam went missing. Her mother arranged her marriage after three months. But the marriage was halted when Faruq pledged to take care of her education. Sima is now an eighth grader at Sikderganj Girls High School.“Faruq uncle has given me a new life. I want to be a physician,” Sima told Prothom Alo.Another student of Sikderganj Girls High School, Tanjila Khatun, showing her schoolbag, said, “Faruq uncle has bought this for me. He also has given me money for private tuition.”The school’s head teacher of Zakir Hossain said, “Faruq has been showing us the potential of dropout students. He also works to raise awareness to keep the village free of drugs and to ensure road safety. He also plants trees to keep the environment cool.”Kashimpur Government Primary School’s head teacher Jalal Uddin said, “Faruq distributes pens, pencils, papers and other stationery to students of different schools twice in a month. He also goes to the house to inquire if any student remains absent at school. This is why cent per cent children of Kashimpur attend school.”Faruq uses his bicycle to go from one school to another. There are several awareness raising stickers stuck to his bicycle against taking drugs, for road safety and against child marriage, etc.Mousumi Khatun was married off when she was an eighth grader. Her in-laws were against her studies. Faruq persuaded her in-laws to allow her to study and took charge of Mousumi’s education.“The dreams of many girls like me are being fulfilled thanks to Faruq uncle. Now I’m studying in college,” Mousumi said.Auliapur union parishad chairman Abdur Razzak considers Faruq a social welfare activist. He was recognised as such on 13 March this year when the prime minister Sheikh Hasina handed over a medal at a programme organised marking National Primary Education Week at Bangabandhu International Conference Centre in Dhaka.Adult education centre at homeFaruq has opened an adult education centre at home where his wife Sabera Akhter teaches adults of the village.Faruq married Sabera of Boaldhar village in Baliadangi of Thakurgaon in 2010. She was a ninth grader then.“I resumed studies upon Faruq’s insistence. In 2011, I took up diploma in agriculture at KBM College in Dinajpur. Now I’m a bachelor degree student at Open University,” Sabera told Prothom Alo.An older woman Shirin Akhter said there was no one in the village who cannot write his/her name.“Maybe Faruq has not given us material wealth, but we’re living with honour for his efforts,” Sabera said.Faruq said he does not work for awards. “I started working so that no one of my area lives in the darkness of illiteracy. This will continue until the dropout rate comes down to zero.”*The report appeared in the print edition of Prothom Alo and has been rewritten in English by Shameem Rezalast_img read more

Tonight AFROs First Edition with Sean Yoes Thursday June 16

first_imgListen at WEAA Live Stream: http://amber.streamguys.com.4020/live.m3u From 5-7 P.M.National politics including, the battle for gun control legislation and Trump versus the GOP, with Eugene Craig, third vice chair of the Maryland GOP and radio host and political commentator Anthony Nolen. These stories and much more coming up on AFRO’s First Edition with Sean Yoes.last_img

CrowdCall App Revolutionizes Conference Calling

first_img This hands-on workshop will give you the tools to authentically connect with an increasingly skeptical online audience. Free Workshop | August 28: Get Better Engagement and Build Trust With Customers Now Enroll Now for Free March 5, 2013 No assembly required: Randy Adams’ CrowdCall streamlines group calling.Photo © David Fentoncenter_img SocialDial was a simple idea: an app that would call contacts through their LinkedIn profiles, without users having to know the phone number. But a few months and 50,000 downloads after the app’s 2011 launch, SocialDial co-founder Randy Adams and his partners realized that a group-calling option that was “buried under two or three layers of menus” was being used far more than any other feature.The popularity of that feature led the team to ditch the original service and launch CrowdCall, a specialized conference-calling app available for iOS and Android smartphones and the web. Instead of scheduling a dial-in line, e-mailing all parties involved and then hoping everyone calls at the appointed time, CrowdCall’s interface lets users choose up to 20 participants from their contacts list and LinkedIn connections and dial them immediately (assuming the contacts have added their phone number to their LinkedIn profiles). When participants answer, they simply push “1” to enter the conference–they don’t even need to have the app to participate.The pivot worked. Approximately three months after the mobile launch last spring, roughly 100,000 people were using the app on a weekly basis. The majority of users were taking advantage of the free version (limited to 500 minutes per month). Revenue from sales of premium versions–priced at $9.99 for 1,000 minutes per month; $49.99 for 10,000 minutes; or $99.99 for unlimited calling–reached nearly $100,000 about four months after launch. Adams’ CrowdCall is now used for some 30,000 calls in the U.S. per month.The app has a mix of commercial and consumer users, but one feature in particular makes it attractive to small businesses. Because the call originator controls invitations, unauthorized participants can’t use dial-in information to access the call, providing a measure of security when discussing sensitive information.Word-of-mouth has been the app’s growth driver–each time someone receives a CrowdCall, that person become a potential customer. “We haven’t spent a dime trying to acquire users,” Adams says.So far the company has raised more than $1 million to launch the app and is working on acquiring $5 million in venture funding, which it hopes to close by the end of the year. That money will be used to build out infrastructure, including an investment in servers to better handle overwhelming demand.Sounds like a good call. 2 min read This story appears in the February 2013 issue of . Subscribe »last_img read more

A report from the American Journal of Preventative

first_imgA report from the American Journal of Preventative Medicine reveals that a large amount of time spent on social media is related to feelings of isolation in young adults.The team of researchers conducted the study via an email survey sent randomly to over 3,000 “non-institutionalized” adults between the ages of 19-32.The participants were asked about their social media habits, including how much time they spent on Facebook, Twitter, Google+, YouTube, LinkedIn, Instagram, Pinterest, Tumblr, Vine, Snapchat, and Reddit for both leisure and work.They were also asked to assess their emotional state via a series of questions such as, how frequently in the past seven days they felt “left out;” “that people barely know me;” “isolated from others;” and “that people are around me but not with me.”The survey results were used to find a correlation between what is called Perceived Social Isolation (PSI) and Social Media Use (SMU).The researchers originally reasoned that higher social media use would result in fewer feelings of isolation among this demographic. However, the data found the opposite is true.Those who used social media for 121 minutes per day or more ranked high in feelings of isolation. These respondents were twice as likely to feel lonely and isolated compared with those who used social media less than 30 minutes a day.The study also had other interesting revelations. Married people have lower odds of PSI as do those making an income between $30,000 and $75,000 per year.In the results section of the abstract of the study, the researchers offered reasons for the findings. “It may be that individuals who are already feeling socially isolated tend to subsequently use more social media; those with fewer “in-person” social outlets may turn to online networks as a substitute” and “those who use increased amounts of social media subsequently develop increased social isolation.” What’s New in TechnologyLatest News for EntrepreneursAgainst All Odds Looks at the Fragility of the … be_ixf; php_sdk; php_sdk_1.4.18 https://www.blackenterprise.com/social-media-makes-young-people-feel-lonely/ https://www.blackenterprise.com/social-media-makes-young-people-feel-lonely/last_img read more

Samsung Asks Owners of the Galaxy Note 7 smartphones to Turn them

first_imgImage Credit: BBC News Advertisement South Korean based conglomerate company, Samsung Corp. on Monday issued an alert to all it’s customers, asking them to immediately turn off their Galaxy Note 7 smartphones which have been spontaneously catching fire. The unprecedented move comes one day after the company halted production of the dangerously glitch devices.In a corporate statement, Samsung said it will also “ask all carrier and retail partners globally to stop sales and exchanges of the Galaxy Note 7” while it investigates the cause of the fires.The company adds that, “Consumers with either an original Galaxy Note 7 or replacement Galaxy Note 7 device should power down and stop using the device until further notice.”Samsung released the 5.7-inch Galaxy Note 7 device in August in anticipation of Apple’s new iPhone 7. But customers immediately started complaining that their phones were catching fire. – Advertisement – The company explained that faulty lithium-ion batteries were overheating the device and causing it to ignite. In early September, Samsung recalled 2.5 million devices worldwide.Samsung offered replacement phones, but those burst into flames too.In the past week, an American user reported his replacement phone caught fire, even though it wasn’t plugged in. And on Wednesday, smoke started billowing from a replacement Galaxy Note 7 aboard a Southwest Airline plane before it departed, prompting the flight’s cancellation.The U.S. Consumer Product Safety Commission is investigating the incident on the plane.U.S. safety regulators and Samsung urged Galaxy Note 7 customers in early September to “immediately stop using and power down” the original Note 7 phones. Now, Samsung is issuing a similar warning for the replacement devices that were supposed to be safe.[related-posts]On Monday, Consumer Product Safety Commission Chairman Elliot F. Kaye said Samsung made “the right move.”“No one should have to be concerned their phone will endanger them, their family or their property,” Kaye said in a statement.The Federal Aviation Administration issued a warning to air travelers last month, asking them to keep their Galaxy Note 7 phones turned off, not to charge them and “not to stow them in any checked baggage.” It updated its warning on Monday, saying it applies to the replacement devices, too.Samsung said that customers who shut down their phones can “take advantage of the remedies available.” According to U.S. federal regulators, consumers are entitled to “a full refund.”source: CNN newslast_img read more

What Your Salary Says About You

first_img Next Article What Your Salary Says About You –shares Free Webinar | Sept 5: Tips and Tools for Making Progress Toward Important Goals Image credit: maxfoundry.com This story originally appeared on CNBC Add to Queue Stacy Rapaconcenter_img 3 min read Every individual’s financial plan starts with earning money, but how much you make may often seem to be out of your control.Only 20 percent of people say they understand how their employer determines pay, according to compensation research firm Payscale.But that doesn’t have to be the case, and it shouldn’t be. “Ten years ago, employers held all the cards. Now, employees can be much better armed with data,” said Tim Low, PayScale’s senior vice president of marketing. With sites such as PayScale and Salary.com, employees have a greater ability to research what their work is worth and a better opportunity to ensure they’re being paid fairly.More than ever, employers must address their own compensation policies and work to keep employees satisfied while maintaining their bottom lines. In light of this new era of transparency, Payscale recently held a webinar for an audience of mostly human-resources professionals, in which they debunked a number of commonly believed myths about compensation.Here are the most commonly held misconceptions: Employers save money by underpaying employees.It is not in the best interest of a company to pay their employees less than fair value and risk creating high turnover. Low says it costs employers 150 percent or more of an employee’s annual pay to hire and retrain someone new. On top of the monetary cost of turnover, company morale is greatly affected when good employees leave. “Counting coins and paying pennies didn’t work for Scrooge, and it won’t work for you,” said Aubrey Bach, senior manager of editorial marketing at PayScale, at the webinar.People don’t leave their jobs because of pay.According to PayScale research, in 2015, the No. 1 reason people left their jobs was, in fact, pay. With the economy and overall job market improving, employees are better positioned to demand higher wages and walk if they don’t feel they are being fairly recognized or compensated. “It’s not universally true across industries and geographies, but as the economy is expanding, employees do have a little more negotiating power,” Low said.As important as pay is, however, job satisfaction can be raised in other ways. For example, workers in health-care and education fields often report high levels of satisfaction even in lower-paying positions. “If people are leaving because of pay, dig deeper,” said Mykkah Herner, director of professional services at PayScale, at the webinar. “Job meaning and an employee’s sphere of influence within their organization are important, too.”Talking to employees about pay will incite a riot.On the contrary, more pay transparency can help improve employer-employee relationships. And it may be better for companies to initiate the conversation rather than let workers simply hash things out on their own. “If you aren’t talking with your employees about pay, chances are that they’re talking to each other and creating their own story of what [the company’s] compensation policy is,” said Bach. “That’s not a good thing.”But when companies have been more open about compensation policies, employees have responded well. In a PayScale survey of 71,000 employees, 82 percent reported that they were satisfied with their jobs, even if they were paid lower than average, if their employers clearly communicated why they offer smaller paychecks. “Basically, communication equals more loyal employees,” said Bach. Attend this free webinar and learn how you can maximize efficiency while getting the most critical things done right. November 17, 2015 Salary Register Now »last_img read more