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Shawsheen Tech Students Earn 70 Medals At SkillsUSA Competition with PHOTOS

first_imgBILLERICA, MA — On Thursday, March 14, 2019  Shawsheen Tech sent 189 students to compete at the SkillsUSA District Competition at Greater Lowell Regional Technical High School. The students competed against schools in their technical areas, challenging their knowledge, in hopes of qualifying for State Competition held this April. Shawsheen students took a written assessment in their technical/trade, an additional test for employability and SkillsUSA Knowledge, as well as an OSHA test in safety. At the end of the day, Shawsheen brought home a total of 70 medals. Gold Medal Winners:Brooke MacInnes, Grade 12, Billerica, Architectural DraftingAmaan Shaikh, Grade 12, Billerica, Automated Manual Technician – DrafterCorrina Jarzynka, Grade 12, Billerica, Culinary ArtsElaina Cobb, Grade 12, Billerica, Health Knowledge BowlSkylar McGarry, Grade 12, Billerica, Medical AssistingCaitlyn Tsoukalas, Grade 12, Billerica, Medical MathFancis O’Connor, Grade  10, Billerica, Power Equipment TechnicianMohammadali Khalifa, Grade 10, Billerica, Robotics & Automation TechnicianJoshua Cabral, Grade 11, Billerica, Team Works – ElectricianTroy Tamis, Grade 12, Billerica, Team Works – PlumberGrace Clark, Grade 11, Bedford, State Officer CandidateAshley Pergamo, Grade 12, Burlington, Automotive Refinishing TechnologyCameron Hudson, Grade 12, Burlington, MechatronicsThomas Vincent, Grade  12, Burlington, Mobile Robotic TechnologyJasin Hensley, Grade 10, Burlington, Robotics & Automation TechnicianMadison Shipka, Grade 12, Burlington, Urban Search & RescueJason Elias, Grade 11, Tewksbury, Automated Manual Technician -MachinistKevin Realejo, Grade 11, Tewksbury, Automated Manual Technician -MachinistJodi Bagrowski, Grade 11, Tewksbury, EstheticsSarah Molander, Grade 11, Tewksbury, Graphic CommunicationsLeah Veloz, Grade 11, Tewksbury, Health Knowledge BowlAllyson Haley, Grade 11, Tewksbury, Health Knowledge BowlMichael Reppucci, Grade 12, Tewksbury, Industrial Motor ControlBrooke Gerry, Grade 11, Tewksbury, MasonryJohn Nowell IV, Grade 12, Tewksbury, MechatronicsDylan Melanson, Grade 12, Tewksbury, PlumbingZachary Kelly, Grade 11, Tewksbury, Team Works – CarpenterJames MacKenzie, Grade 12, Tewksbury, Team Works – MasonAnnalea Martins, Grade  11, Wilmington, Basic Health Care SkillsZachary Dancewicz, Grade 12, Wilmington, CarpentryNathan Helmar, Grade 12, Wilmington, Diesel Equipment TechnicianJuila Messina, Grade 11, Wilmington, Graphic Imaging SublimationOlivia Sanchez, Grade 10, Wilmington, Health Knowledge BowlAndrew Miller, Grade 12, Wilmington, Mobile Robotic TechnologyCelina Barczak, Grade 11, Wilmington, Nursing AssistingAmanda Howell, Grade 10, Wilmington, Technical DraftingJames Ward, Grade 12, Wilmington, Urban Search & RescueSilver Medals Winners:Connor Rich, Grade 11, Billerica, Architectural DraftingEmily Morris, Grade 12, Billerica, Dental AssistantDaniel Matarazzo, Grade 12, Billerica, Diesel Equipment TechnicianCassidy Bulmer, Grade 12, Billerica, Health Knowledge BowlBrayden Taylor, Grade 11, Billerica, Mobile Robotic TechnologyMatthew Canadas, Grade 11, Billerica, Mobile Robotic TechnologyMackenzie Cassidy, Grade 12, Billerica, Nursing AssistingShaunna Ford, Grade 12, Billerica, Screen Print TechnologyTaylor Sacco, Grade 11, Bedford, Health Knowledge BowlAntavious Nordquist, Grade 10, Bedford, Technical DraftingChristina Paras, Grade 11, Burlington, Graphic Imaging SublimationJenna Hensley, Grade 11, Burlington, Health Knowledge BowlJames Sweeney, Grade 11, Burlington, PlumbingAnthony Prezioso, Grade 10, Tewksbury, CarpentryRachel Conway, Grade 12, Tewksbury, MasonryMichael Rosa, Grade 11, Tewksbury, Team Works – CarpenterDavid Williams III, Grade 11, Tewksbury, Team Works – ElectricianBrendan Gray, Grade 11, Tewksbury, Team Works – T2 PlumberCole Privetera, Grade 11, Tewksbury, Health Knowledge BowlMadison Musto, Grade 12, Wilmington, Team Works – MasonJessica Stevens, Grade 11, Wilmington, Technical Computer ApplicationsBronze Medal Winners:Taylor Thurell, Grade 12, Billerica, Basic Health Care SkillsZachary Langlois, Grade 11, Billerica, CarpentrySamantha Collins, Grade 12, Billerica, Health Knowledge BowlBrooke Amato, Grade 12, Billerica, Health Knowledge BowlShawn Powderly, Grade 12, Billerica, PlumbingMichael Cremens, Grade 11, Billerica, Sheet MetalVeronika Bazzinotti, Grade 12, Tewksbury, Dental AssistantCameron Loder, Grade 10, Tewksbury, Diesel Equipment TechnicianAlexa Krogstie, Grade 11, Tewksbury, Health Knowledge BowlMadison Gray, Grade 12, Tewksbury, Health Knowledge BowlTaryn King, Grade 12, Wilmington, Graphic CommunicationsAmanda Ramsdell, Grade 11, Wilmington, MasonryGold and silver medal winners have earned their ticket to the annual State Leadership & Skills Conference.At that Conference, more than 2,500 students will compete in 86 occupational and leadership skill areas. Shawsheen students will compete in the practical skills portion of each contest to become a Gold medalist from Massachusetts, earning the opportunity to join more than 6,000 students to compete in the annual national-level SkillsUSA Championships.Photos:Sweeping in Carpentry: Tewksbury sophomore Anthony Preziso (silver), Wilmington senior Zachary Dancewicz (gold), & Billerica junior Zachary Langlois (bronze)Winning the gold medal in culinary arts was Billerica senior Corrina JarzynkaTaking gold in the Health Knowledge Bowl were Tewksbury junior Leah Veloz, Wilmington sophomore Olivia Sanchez, Billerica senior Elaina Cobb, and Tewksbury junior Allyson Haley. Elaina and Leah are hoping to lead another team to nationals this year.Sweeping the Masonry contest: Tewksbury senior Rachel Conway (silver), Tewksbury junior Brooke Gerry (gold), & Wilmington junior Amanda Ramsdell (bronze)Sweeping in the Plumbing contest: Burlington junior James Sweeney (silver), Tewksbury senior Dylan Melanson (gold), and Billerica senior Shawn Powderly (bronze)Winning the silver medals in screening was Billerica senior Shaunna Ford. Shaunna is hoping for another chance to attend the National Conference and better her 4th place standing in the nation.Winning gold in Team Works: Back — Tewksbury senior James MacKenzie, Left to Right: Tewksbury junior Zachary Kelley, Billerica senior Troy Tamis, & Billerica junior Joshua CabralBring home medals in Technical Drafting were Wilmington sophomore Amanda Howell (gold) and Bedford sophomore Antavious Nordquist (silver)(NOTE: The above press release is from the Shawsheen Tech.)Like Wilmington Apple on Facebook. Follow Wilmington Apple on Twitter. Follow Wilmington Apple on Instagram. Subscribe to Wilmington Apple’s daily email newsletter HERE. Got a comment, question, photo, press release, or news tip? Email wilmingtonapple@gmail.com.Share this:TwitterFacebookLike this:Like Loading… RelatedShawsheen Tech Students Win 30 Medals At SkillsUSA State ConferenceIn “Education”Shawsheen Tech Celebrates SkillsUSA National MedalistsIn “Education”4 Wilmington Students Earn SkillsUSA Medals At Shawsheen TechIn “Education”last_img read more

Europes relief after Estonia election

first_imgEurope’s relief after Estonia election192 viewsEurope’s relief after Estonia election192 views00:00 / 00:00- 00:00:0000:00Europe’s relief after Estonia election192 viewsBusinessAnother neighbour of Russia has turned towards Europe. Estonia’s centre-right prime minister claimed victory in Sunday’s election. Taavi Roivas, the leader of the Reform Party, is set to form aVentuno Web Player 4.50Another neighbour of Russia has turned towards Europe. Estonia’s centre-right prime minister claimed victory in Sunday’s election. Taavi Roivas, the leader of the Reform Party, is set to form alast_img read more

Apple and Google poaching settlement headed for approval

first_img A US judge on 2 March seemed satisfied with a proposed $415m (£267m) settlement that would end a lawsuit in which tech workers accused Apple, Google and two other Silicon Valley companies of conspiring to hold down salaries.US District Judge Lucy Koh in San Jose, California, had previously rejected an earlier $324.5m deal as too low. During a hearing on Monday, Koh raised no objections about the size of the settlement as she had at an earlier court session.While Koh did not formally rule from the bench on whether she would preliminarily approve the new deal, she set another hearing date for final sign off.The plaintiffs alleged that Apple, Google, Intel and Adobe agreed to avoid poaching each others employees, thus limiting job mobility and, as a result, keeping a lid on salaries.The antitrust class action lawsuit was filed in 2011. It has been closely watched because of the possibility that big damages might be awarded and for the opportunity to peek into the world of some of the United States elite tech firms.The case was based largely on emails in which Apple co-founder Steve Jobs, former Google Chief Executive Officer Eric Schmidt and some of their rivals detailed plans to avoid poaching each others prized engineers.In rejecting the $324.5 million deal, Koh repeatedly referred to a related 2013 settlement involving Disney and Intuit. Apple and Google workers got proportionally less than Disney workers, Koh wrote, even though plaintiff lawyers had much more leverage against Apple and Google.To match the earlier settlement, the deal with Apple, Google, Intel and Adobe would need to total at least $380 million, Koh wrote. Closelast_img read more

Faruq spreads literacy in remote villages

first_imgFaruq Hossain. Photo: Prothom Alo“I won’t spend excesively or buy expensive clothes. I’ll spend one fourth of my salary on education for children of poor families.” Armed with this oath, 32-year-old Faruq Hossain has been working in a remote area of Dinajpur sadar upazila for the last 10 years.Faruq is from Malipukur village in Auliapur union of Dinajpur sadar upazila. He is an assistant to a truck driver of Bangladesh Agricultural Development Corporation (BADC).He spends 25 per cent of his monthly salary of Tk 14,900 for the education of poor people’s children. He takes care of his four-member family, comprising himself, his mother Sanwara Begum, wife Sabera Akhter and two-and-a-half-year-old son Sabbir Hossain with rest of the money.Faruq distributes education material among the students every Friday and Saturday. He also has set up a centre for educating adults at his house.In recognition of his initiatives, Faruq was awarded by the prime minister Sheikh Hasina on 13 March this year.The Malipukur village is 4.5 kilometres away off Dinajpur sadar upazila. On 10 February, the Prothom Alo correspondents visited Faruq’s home. He lives in a dilapidated mud-house. Relatives said Faruq’s father Mahbub Hossain passed away in 2006. He was a labourer at BADC. Faruq also joined as a labourer at BADC in 2002.All the labourers used to draw their wages with thumbprints as they were not literate and could not sign their names. Faruq studied up to the eighth grade. He started educating his fellow workers so that everyone would be able to sign their names to draw their wages.Saving his pocket-money along with some taken from his father, Faruq bought 200 taka worth of pens and papers for the labourers. Gradually he imparted basic literacy to all of them. Delighted, a driver Naresh Chandra taught Faruq how to drive. Faruq then joined as a temporary driver at the office of the deputy director of BADC in Rajshahi in 2007. Later on 16 July that year, he was appointed as an assistant to the truck driver and transferred to Rangpur BADC office. Since then, he is working as a driver of BADC joint director (seed processing centre) AFM Saiful Islam.Unlike others, Faruq did not stop there. “I had a dream to be self-sufficient after completing my studies. But poverty cut my dreams short when I was an eighth grader at Cheradangi High School. That’s why I decided to help those who could not continue studying due to poverty,” said Faruq to Prothom Alo.Faruq said the studies of Nur Islam from Kashimpur Mahanpara village came to a halt due to lack of education material and proper clothes in July 2008. He went to Nur Islam’s home and gave his mother 3000 taka. Nur Islam is now a student at Dinajpur Government College.In December that year, Faruq held a meeting with the seniors of the village. He told them he would not eat paan (betel leaf), smole cigarettes or buy expensive clothes. Instead he will help students from poor families. In 2009, he bought education material and clothes for 20 students with 25 per cent of his salary and admitted them to school. As of now, Faruq said, he has helped almost 2,000 students of the union.Ninth grader Zahid Hossain, eighth grader Amena and seventh grader Abdus Sattar at Cheradangi High School are some of the students from poor families who received Faruq’s help.When Sima Akhter from Malipukur village was a fifth grader, her father Samirul Islam went missing. Her mother arranged her marriage after three months. But the marriage was halted when Faruq pledged to take care of her education. Sima is now an eighth grader at Sikderganj Girls High School.“Faruq uncle has given me a new life. I want to be a physician,” Sima told Prothom Alo.Another student of Sikderganj Girls High School, Tanjila Khatun, showing her schoolbag, said, “Faruq uncle has bought this for me. He also has given me money for private tuition.”The school’s head teacher of Zakir Hossain said, “Faruq has been showing us the potential of dropout students. He also works to raise awareness to keep the village free of drugs and to ensure road safety. He also plants trees to keep the environment cool.”Kashimpur Government Primary School’s head teacher Jalal Uddin said, “Faruq distributes pens, pencils, papers and other stationery to students of different schools twice in a month. He also goes to the house to inquire if any student remains absent at school. This is why cent per cent children of Kashimpur attend school.”Faruq uses his bicycle to go from one school to another. There are several awareness raising stickers stuck to his bicycle against taking drugs, for road safety and against child marriage, etc.Mousumi Khatun was married off when she was an eighth grader. Her in-laws were against her studies. Faruq persuaded her in-laws to allow her to study and took charge of Mousumi’s education.“The dreams of many girls like me are being fulfilled thanks to Faruq uncle. Now I’m studying in college,” Mousumi said.Auliapur union parishad chairman Abdur Razzak considers Faruq a social welfare activist. He was recognised as such on 13 March this year when the prime minister Sheikh Hasina handed over a medal at a programme organised marking National Primary Education Week at Bangabandhu International Conference Centre in Dhaka.Adult education centre at homeFaruq has opened an adult education centre at home where his wife Sabera Akhter teaches adults of the village.Faruq married Sabera of Boaldhar village in Baliadangi of Thakurgaon in 2010. She was a ninth grader then.“I resumed studies upon Faruq’s insistence. In 2011, I took up diploma in agriculture at KBM College in Dinajpur. Now I’m a bachelor degree student at Open University,” Sabera told Prothom Alo.An older woman Shirin Akhter said there was no one in the village who cannot write his/her name.“Maybe Faruq has not given us material wealth, but we’re living with honour for his efforts,” Sabera said.Faruq said he does not work for awards. “I started working so that no one of my area lives in the darkness of illiteracy. This will continue until the dropout rate comes down to zero.”*The report appeared in the print edition of Prothom Alo and has been rewritten in English by Shameem Rezalast_img read more

Whos doing Christianity right At Taylor University Pence invitation highlig …

first_img Facebook Twitter Pinterest LinkedIn ReddIt Email Share This! Share This! Facebook Twitter Pinterest LinkedIn ReddIt Email,About the authorView All Posts Emily McFarlan Miller Emily McFarlan Miller is a national reporter for RNS based in Chicago. She covers evangelical and mainline Protestant Christianity.,Load Comments,Facebook bans ‘dangerous individuals’ cited for hate speech Trump, rabbi of attacked synagogue observe National Day of Prayer at White House By: Emily McFarlan Miller emmillerwrites Tagscommencement evangelicalism homepage featured Mike Pence Taylor University,You may also like Instagram apostasy stirs controversy over Christian ‘influencers’ August 30, 2019 News As Amazon burns, Vatican prepares for summit on region’s faith and sustainabilit … August 30, 2019 Share This! By: Emily McFarlan Miller emmillerwrites Facebook Twitter Pinterest LinkedIn ReddIt Email Photos of the Week August 30, 2019 Share This! Catholicism Share This! Facebook Twitter Pinterest LinkedIn ReddIt Email,UPLAND, Ind. (RNS) — Like most Americans, students at Taylor University have strong feelings about President Trump and his vice president, Mike Pence, as well as the relationship between religion and politics.So when news broke last month that Pence would speak at Taylor’s upcoming commencement, reactions were mixed.Some students love the decision. Some hate it.Others see the whole thing as divisive, according to students discussing the announcement in Professor Alan Blanchard’s Advanced Media Writing class April 16 at Taylor.“I think that for years we have been in a school that’s very open to conversation, and I think the last couple of months — last year — has just kind of been a battle for who’s right,” said Lexie Lake, a senior in the class.RELATED: Pence controversy at Taylor University a sign of changes coming to Christian colleges (COMMENTARY)The controversy over Pence’s visit is not the only recent disagreement at Taylor.Earlier this year, a Taylor professor started a petition against a planned Starbucks on campus because of its “stands on the sanctity of life and human sexuality.” And last year, an anonymous conservative publication popped up on campus with complaints the school had become too liberal.Like so much of evangelicalism in the United States, the Christian liberal arts school — which always has prided itself on welcoming diverse Christian perspectives — has in recent years found itself engaged in a battle for the soul of the movement.Taylor University junior Tiffany Rogers. RNS photo by Emily McFarlan Miller“It’s now pitting Christian against Christian: Who’s more Christian? Who loves God more? Who’s doing it right?” junior Tiffany Rogers said.“Who’s doing Christianity right?”Taylor University describes itself on its website as a nondenominational Christian school that “encourages students to ask hard questions” on its picturesque campus surrounded by Indiana cornfields.Its 2,000 students are required to sign a “Life Together Covenant” largely upholding a conservative evangelical view of Christianity. Among other things, the school prohibits alcohol and tobacco use, “homosexual behavior,” premarital sex and social dancing outside of school-sanctioned dances.Taylor’s approach seems popular among evangelicals. The school recently tied with Calvin College in Grand Rapids, Mich., for the No. 1 regional college in the Midwest in U.S. News and World Report’s 2019 rankings.John Fea — a professor of American history at Messiah College and author of the book “Believe Me: The Evangelical Road to Donald Trump” who spoke at Taylor in October — described the school as “warmly evangelical.”Fea said Taylor never has been known as a political place in the same way as much larger evangelical school Liberty University in Lynchburg, Va., where President Jerry Falwell Jr. is a vocal supporter of Trump. Even Wheaton College, the flagship evangelical school in Wheaton, Ill., is more political than Taylor.But schools like Taylor, which might have taken a live and let live approach to politics in the past, now may feel like they have to take sides, according to the historian.“People have always debated the meaning of what an evangelical is or what an evangelical college might look like,” he said. “But I think the election of Donald Trump certainly kind of exacerbated or enhanced these issues and put them now much more on the front of the identity agenda that Christian colleges are having to deal with.”Taylor University campus on April 16, 2019, in Upland, Ind. RNS photo by Emily McFarlan MillerA number of Christian colleges have made headlines since the 2016 election campaign for controversies stemming from conservative and progressive divides in both theology and politics. Oftentimes, their students hold more progressive views than their parents or donors.That was the case at Azusa Pacific University in Azusa, Calif., which announced in 2018 it would remove a clause from its student code of conduct that prohibited same-sex romantic relationships. Students applauded the decision, while some of the school’s board members and supporters objected. The school first reinstated its ban on same-sex relationships, then lifted that ban this spring, according to published reports.RELATED: Most evangelical college students appreciate LGBT people even if trustees don’tA week after the April 11 announcement that Pence will speak at commencement, it still dominated news on Taylor’s campus, about an hour and a half northeast of Indianapolis.Newspaper racks in campus buildings carried headlines about the controversy on the front page of The Echo, the student newspaper. And a lighthearted publication called Click Bait, published by a student group known as the Integration of Faith & Culture Cabinet, landed on tables in the student center with the satirical headline “Pence Security Team to Build Wall Around Commencement Stage.”Journalism students in an Advanced Media Writing class interact at Taylor University on April 16, 2019, in Upland, Ind. RNS photo by Emily McFarlan MillerFaculty approved a motion 61-49 dissenting to Pence’s invitation after Taylor President P. Lowell Haines announced the commencement speaker at a faculty meeting, according to an account in The Echo.Not long after an email went out from the school announcing Pence’s visit, another email landed in students’ inboxes, inviting them to three listening sessions hosted by the school where they could make their feelings heard about the choice.Lowell Haines. Photo courtesy of Taylor UniversityIn an email last week to the campus community that was provided to Religion News Service, Haines said that when he was presented with the opportunity to have Pence speak at the school’s commencement, he pursued it with “the best of intentions.”He acknowledged some have been offended by the selection and said the school is working with faculty, staff and student leaders to make sure the May 18 commencement ceremony honors everyone in attendance — including the vice president.“I pray that over time, we will be able to overcome this current, deeply emotional challenge in a manner that reflects God’s desire that we show love and grace when confronted with conflict in life,” he wrote in his message addressed to the “Taylor Family.”“We have always been a community that, while deeply and firmly grounded in our Christian faith, celebrates what is unique about each individual and encourages diversity of thought and personhood,” Haines said.Haines did not respond to requests for an interview by RNS.The school has heard feedback from people both supportive of and opposed to its decision to invite Pence, according to James R. Garringer, Taylor’s director of media relations.“Taylor University is an intentional Christian community that strives to encourage positive, respectful and meaningful dialogue. We look forward to hosting the Vice President next month,” Garringer said in a written statement to RNS.Professor Jim Spiegel, who teaches philosophy and religion at Taylor, authored the petition against Starbucks’ coming to Taylor and said he was one of the authors of the anonymous conservative newsletter.He said the headlines recent controversies have drawn are “certainly new and somewhat surprising for Taylor.”“We don’t have a significant history of being politically vocal and active,” he said.Taylor University sophomore Sam Jones. RNS photo by Emily McFarlan MillerSam Jones — a sophomore at Taylor who grew up in a conservative, nondenominational Christian family in Wheaton, Ill., and now attends a charismatic church near the school — is looking forward to Pence’s visit.Jones said he and his roommate started a Change.org petition supporting Pence as commencement speaker.As of Thursday (May 2), more than 5,900 people had signed onto their petition, which argued that people in positions of power should be respected and welcomed on campus and that the university wasn’t aligning itself with Pence by inviting him, but rather “simply giving a voice to all opinions and planes of thought.”A petition protesting Pence’s appearance, also hosted on Change.org, has gathered more than 7,200 signatures.“Inviting Vice President Pence to Taylor University and giving him a coveted platform for his political views makes our alumni, faculty, staff and current students complicit in the Trump-Pence Administration’s policies, which we believe are not consistent with the Christian ethic of love we hold dear,” reads the petition, which was started by a 2007 Taylor graduate.If Democrat Joe Biden were invited to speak at commencement when he was vice president, Jones told RNS, he’d be just as excited.“For Taylor to have that opportunity — a school of 2,000 kids in the middle of a cornfield — is incredible,” he said.In the two years Jones has been at Taylor, he said, political conversations have often become tense and divisive.“I think, as a university, this is the place where you need to have all sorts of different opinions because people are here to learn,” he said. “We’re not here because we have everything figured out. We’re here to learn new things from new people.”Rogers, the junior, also agrees that it is important to listen to all the voices on campus. And she wishes she could be excited about the sitting vice president visiting her school, too, she said.But Rogers — who is from Fort Lauderdale, Fla., and attends an Episcopal church near the school — said she has a hard time squaring Pence’s stances toward LGBTQ rights with Christianity’s call to love. She worries about the message his appearance sends to students and their families coming to commencement from outside the U.S., given the Trump administration’s stances on immigration and refugee admissions.She pointed to a statement by Haines in the school’s announcement that suggests to her Taylor’s invitation indicates support for Pence and his policies: “Mr. Pence has been a good friend to the University over many years, and is a Christian brother whose life and values have exemplified what we strive to instill in our graduates.”Inviting Pence seems out of character for the university she’s grown to love, said Rogers.“Taylor has never really taken a stance on politics, and we’re a nondenominational school so we don’t even take a stance on a denomination,” she said.“So this is just them very clearly stating what they believe and what they’re for, which has never really been said before. I think a lot of people are taken aback by that.”Professor Alan Blanchard teaches a journalism class at Taylor University on April 16, 2019, in Upland, Ind. RNS photo by Emily McFarlan MillerBlanchard, who teaches journalism at Taylor, said the controversy on campus is a “teachable moment.”At the faculty meeting discussing Pence’s invitation, Blanchard said he argued that administrators, faculty and students should allow people to speak at the school with whom they disagree a little — or a lot. They should be able to talk about those things on which they disagree and still, at the end of the day, “honor God’s two greatest commandments: Love God with all your heart and love your neighbor as yourself.”He’s discussed the upcoming commencement speech with all his journalism classes — even asking them to write letters to the editor about their feelings about the vice president’s visit.“I think — not just for journalism students or professional journalists — I think we all benefit when we listen to people with different viewpoints and different ideas,” he said. News • Photos of the Week Emily McFarlan Miller emmillerwrites By: Emily McFarlan Miller emmillerwrites Facebook Twitter Pinterest LinkedIn ReddIt Emaillast_img read more

CrowdCall App Revolutionizes Conference Calling

first_img This hands-on workshop will give you the tools to authentically connect with an increasingly skeptical online audience. Free Workshop | August 28: Get Better Engagement and Build Trust With Customers Now Enroll Now for Free March 5, 2013 No assembly required: Randy Adams’ CrowdCall streamlines group calling.Photo © David Fentoncenter_img SocialDial was a simple idea: an app that would call contacts through their LinkedIn profiles, without users having to know the phone number. But a few months and 50,000 downloads after the app’s 2011 launch, SocialDial co-founder Randy Adams and his partners realized that a group-calling option that was “buried under two or three layers of menus” was being used far more than any other feature.The popularity of that feature led the team to ditch the original service and launch CrowdCall, a specialized conference-calling app available for iOS and Android smartphones and the web. Instead of scheduling a dial-in line, e-mailing all parties involved and then hoping everyone calls at the appointed time, CrowdCall’s interface lets users choose up to 20 participants from their contacts list and LinkedIn connections and dial them immediately (assuming the contacts have added their phone number to their LinkedIn profiles). When participants answer, they simply push “1” to enter the conference–they don’t even need to have the app to participate.The pivot worked. Approximately three months after the mobile launch last spring, roughly 100,000 people were using the app on a weekly basis. The majority of users were taking advantage of the free version (limited to 500 minutes per month). Revenue from sales of premium versions–priced at $9.99 for 1,000 minutes per month; $49.99 for 10,000 minutes; or $99.99 for unlimited calling–reached nearly $100,000 about four months after launch. Adams’ CrowdCall is now used for some 30,000 calls in the U.S. per month.The app has a mix of commercial and consumer users, but one feature in particular makes it attractive to small businesses. Because the call originator controls invitations, unauthorized participants can’t use dial-in information to access the call, providing a measure of security when discussing sensitive information.Word-of-mouth has been the app’s growth driver–each time someone receives a CrowdCall, that person become a potential customer. “We haven’t spent a dime trying to acquire users,” Adams says.So far the company has raised more than $1 million to launch the app and is working on acquiring $5 million in venture funding, which it hopes to close by the end of the year. That money will be used to build out infrastructure, including an investment in servers to better handle overwhelming demand.Sounds like a good call. 2 min read This story appears in the February 2013 issue of . Subscribe »last_img read more

Rail Europe partners with Switzerland Tourism to launch Swiss Travel Pass

first_imgTags: Promotions, Rail Europe, Switzerland Travelweek Group Share Posted by Monday, May 15, 2017 center_img << Previous PostNext Post >> Rail Europe partners with Switzerland Tourism to launch Swiss Travel Pass WHITE PLAINS, NY — Rail Europe has announced a special offer for Swiss travel in partnership with Switzerland Tourism and Swiss Travel System.Now through May 23, 2017, travellers booking a four-day consecutive Swiss Travel Pass, receive one day free, and those booking an eight-day consecutive pass, receive two days free. Complimentary travel days are available for first and second class, for Adult and Youth passes. Must be validated by Oct. 26, 2017.With the Swiss Travel Pass, clients can journey between destinations in the Swiss Alps, such as St. Moritz or Lucerne by trains, boats and buses. It is part of the Swiss Travel System and includes travel on scenic trains such as the Glacier Express, GoldenPass Line and Bernina Express, free admission to over 500 Swiss museums, public transportation in over 90 Swiss cities, a 50% reduction off most mountain railways and cable cars, and free access to Mt Pilatus and Mt Rigi. E-passes are available.More news:  Apply now for AQSC’s agent cruise ratesFamilies can enjoy more savings, as children under 16 years travel free with a parent or legal guardian with a free Swiss Family Card. Children under six do not require a rail pass or family card.last_img read more