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Shawsheen Tech Students Earn 70 Medals At SkillsUSA Competition with PHOTOS

first_imgBILLERICA, MA — On Thursday, March 14, 2019  Shawsheen Tech sent 189 students to compete at the SkillsUSA District Competition at Greater Lowell Regional Technical High School. The students competed against schools in their technical areas, challenging their knowledge, in hopes of qualifying for State Competition held this April. Shawsheen students took a written assessment in their technical/trade, an additional test for employability and SkillsUSA Knowledge, as well as an OSHA test in safety. At the end of the day, Shawsheen brought home a total of 70 medals. Gold Medal Winners:Brooke MacInnes, Grade 12, Billerica, Architectural DraftingAmaan Shaikh, Grade 12, Billerica, Automated Manual Technician – DrafterCorrina Jarzynka, Grade 12, Billerica, Culinary ArtsElaina Cobb, Grade 12, Billerica, Health Knowledge BowlSkylar McGarry, Grade 12, Billerica, Medical AssistingCaitlyn Tsoukalas, Grade 12, Billerica, Medical MathFancis O’Connor, Grade  10, Billerica, Power Equipment TechnicianMohammadali Khalifa, Grade 10, Billerica, Robotics & Automation TechnicianJoshua Cabral, Grade 11, Billerica, Team Works – ElectricianTroy Tamis, Grade 12, Billerica, Team Works – PlumberGrace Clark, Grade 11, Bedford, State Officer CandidateAshley Pergamo, Grade 12, Burlington, Automotive Refinishing TechnologyCameron Hudson, Grade 12, Burlington, MechatronicsThomas Vincent, Grade  12, Burlington, Mobile Robotic TechnologyJasin Hensley, Grade 10, Burlington, Robotics & Automation TechnicianMadison Shipka, Grade 12, Burlington, Urban Search & RescueJason Elias, Grade 11, Tewksbury, Automated Manual Technician -MachinistKevin Realejo, Grade 11, Tewksbury, Automated Manual Technician -MachinistJodi Bagrowski, Grade 11, Tewksbury, EstheticsSarah Molander, Grade 11, Tewksbury, Graphic CommunicationsLeah Veloz, Grade 11, Tewksbury, Health Knowledge BowlAllyson Haley, Grade 11, Tewksbury, Health Knowledge BowlMichael Reppucci, Grade 12, Tewksbury, Industrial Motor ControlBrooke Gerry, Grade 11, Tewksbury, MasonryJohn Nowell IV, Grade 12, Tewksbury, MechatronicsDylan Melanson, Grade 12, Tewksbury, PlumbingZachary Kelly, Grade 11, Tewksbury, Team Works – CarpenterJames MacKenzie, Grade 12, Tewksbury, Team Works – MasonAnnalea Martins, Grade  11, Wilmington, Basic Health Care SkillsZachary Dancewicz, Grade 12, Wilmington, CarpentryNathan Helmar, Grade 12, Wilmington, Diesel Equipment TechnicianJuila Messina, Grade 11, Wilmington, Graphic Imaging SublimationOlivia Sanchez, Grade 10, Wilmington, Health Knowledge BowlAndrew Miller, Grade 12, Wilmington, Mobile Robotic TechnologyCelina Barczak, Grade 11, Wilmington, Nursing AssistingAmanda Howell, Grade 10, Wilmington, Technical DraftingJames Ward, Grade 12, Wilmington, Urban Search & RescueSilver Medals Winners:Connor Rich, Grade 11, Billerica, Architectural DraftingEmily Morris, Grade 12, Billerica, Dental AssistantDaniel Matarazzo, Grade 12, Billerica, Diesel Equipment TechnicianCassidy Bulmer, Grade 12, Billerica, Health Knowledge BowlBrayden Taylor, Grade 11, Billerica, Mobile Robotic TechnologyMatthew Canadas, Grade 11, Billerica, Mobile Robotic TechnologyMackenzie Cassidy, Grade 12, Billerica, Nursing AssistingShaunna Ford, Grade 12, Billerica, Screen Print TechnologyTaylor Sacco, Grade 11, Bedford, Health Knowledge BowlAntavious Nordquist, Grade 10, Bedford, Technical DraftingChristina Paras, Grade 11, Burlington, Graphic Imaging SublimationJenna Hensley, Grade 11, Burlington, Health Knowledge BowlJames Sweeney, Grade 11, Burlington, PlumbingAnthony Prezioso, Grade 10, Tewksbury, CarpentryRachel Conway, Grade 12, Tewksbury, MasonryMichael Rosa, Grade 11, Tewksbury, Team Works – CarpenterDavid Williams III, Grade 11, Tewksbury, Team Works – ElectricianBrendan Gray, Grade 11, Tewksbury, Team Works – T2 PlumberCole Privetera, Grade 11, Tewksbury, Health Knowledge BowlMadison Musto, Grade 12, Wilmington, Team Works – MasonJessica Stevens, Grade 11, Wilmington, Technical Computer ApplicationsBronze Medal Winners:Taylor Thurell, Grade 12, Billerica, Basic Health Care SkillsZachary Langlois, Grade 11, Billerica, CarpentrySamantha Collins, Grade 12, Billerica, Health Knowledge BowlBrooke Amato, Grade 12, Billerica, Health Knowledge BowlShawn Powderly, Grade 12, Billerica, PlumbingMichael Cremens, Grade 11, Billerica, Sheet MetalVeronika Bazzinotti, Grade 12, Tewksbury, Dental AssistantCameron Loder, Grade 10, Tewksbury, Diesel Equipment TechnicianAlexa Krogstie, Grade 11, Tewksbury, Health Knowledge BowlMadison Gray, Grade 12, Tewksbury, Health Knowledge BowlTaryn King, Grade 12, Wilmington, Graphic CommunicationsAmanda Ramsdell, Grade 11, Wilmington, MasonryGold and silver medal winners have earned their ticket to the annual State Leadership & Skills Conference.At that Conference, more than 2,500 students will compete in 86 occupational and leadership skill areas. Shawsheen students will compete in the practical skills portion of each contest to become a Gold medalist from Massachusetts, earning the opportunity to join more than 6,000 students to compete in the annual national-level SkillsUSA Championships.Photos:Sweeping in Carpentry: Tewksbury sophomore Anthony Preziso (silver), Wilmington senior Zachary Dancewicz (gold), & Billerica junior Zachary Langlois (bronze)Winning the gold medal in culinary arts was Billerica senior Corrina JarzynkaTaking gold in the Health Knowledge Bowl were Tewksbury junior Leah Veloz, Wilmington sophomore Olivia Sanchez, Billerica senior Elaina Cobb, and Tewksbury junior Allyson Haley. Elaina and Leah are hoping to lead another team to nationals this year.Sweeping the Masonry contest: Tewksbury senior Rachel Conway (silver), Tewksbury junior Brooke Gerry (gold), & Wilmington junior Amanda Ramsdell (bronze)Sweeping in the Plumbing contest: Burlington junior James Sweeney (silver), Tewksbury senior Dylan Melanson (gold), and Billerica senior Shawn Powderly (bronze)Winning the silver medals in screening was Billerica senior Shaunna Ford. Shaunna is hoping for another chance to attend the National Conference and better her 4th place standing in the nation.Winning gold in Team Works: Back — Tewksbury senior James MacKenzie, Left to Right: Tewksbury junior Zachary Kelley, Billerica senior Troy Tamis, & Billerica junior Joshua CabralBring home medals in Technical Drafting were Wilmington sophomore Amanda Howell (gold) and Bedford sophomore Antavious Nordquist (silver)(NOTE: The above press release is from the Shawsheen Tech.)Like Wilmington Apple on Facebook. Follow Wilmington Apple on Twitter. Follow Wilmington Apple on Instagram. Subscribe to Wilmington Apple’s daily email newsletter HERE. Got a comment, question, photo, press release, or news tip? Email wilmingtonapple@gmail.com.Share this:TwitterFacebookLike this:Like Loading… RelatedShawsheen Tech Students Win 30 Medals At SkillsUSA State ConferenceIn “Education”Shawsheen Tech Celebrates SkillsUSA National MedalistsIn “Education”4 Wilmington Students Earn SkillsUSA Medals At Shawsheen TechIn “Education”last_img read more

Buy Microsoft Office for 100 get a 50 Amazon gift card

first_imgMicrosoft Cheapskates don’t use Microsoft Office. Or, at least, they don’t pay for it: Microsoft offers pretty decent freebie versions of Word, Excel and PowerPoint that live in your browser.And let’s not forget the various free alternatives, such as Google Docs, LibreOffice and WPS Office.All that being said, some people have a particular need for Microsoft’s suite — and if you’re one of them, you might as well try to score a deal. Like this one: Today only, Amazon is offering a $50 gift card when you purchase a 12-month Office 365 Home subscription for $99.99. That’s for a digital download.See it at AmazonThis version supports up to six users, and they don’t all have to be in your house. Each person gets a 1-terabyte OneDrive cloud account, which is definitely one of the bigger value-adds here.You also get Publisher, which is one of the few remaining desktop-publishing tools, and Outlook, one of the few remaining full-featured mail clients.The regular $100 annual price bugs me. I’d really like to see Microsoft drop it to $50 — but that would be unparalleled, so we have to settle for sales like these.Your thoughts?Blue Yeti USB microphone: $70 (save $49)blue-yeti-steel-red Blue A good microphone is essential for everything from podcasting to Skype calling, and Blue makes some of the best consumer mics out there. They can be a little pricey, though.Ah, but this: For a limited time and while supplies last, BuyDig has the Blue Yeti USB microphone in Steel Red (drool) for $69.99 when you apply promo code MICD. Price elsewhere (including Amazon) for this color: $119. The black one can often be found for $100.See it at BuyDigThis attractive desktop mic works with PCs and Macs and supports four recording patterns. I haven’t used one myself, but the user reviews everywhere you look are overwhelmingly positive.Definitely Cheapskate approved.CNET’s Cheapskate scours the web for great deals on PCs, phones, gadgets and much more. Note that CNET may get a share of revenue from the sale of the products featured on this page. Questions about the Cheapskate blog? Find the answers on our FAQ page. Find more great buys on the CNET Deals page and follow the Cheapskate on Facebook and Twitter! Tags 10 Share your voice Comments The Cheapskate Amazon Microsoft Office Microsoft Best laptops for college students: We’ve got an affordable laptop for every student. Best live TV streaming services: Ditch your cable company but keep the live channels and DVR. Software Componentslast_img read more

Chris Kraft One Of The Architects Of The US Space Program Dies

first_img Share David J. Phillip/APNASA Mission Control founder Chris Kraft in the old mission control at Johnson Space Center in Houston. This original mission control of the Apollo era is a national historic landmark.One of NASA’s first employees, key to creating the U.S. space program, has died at 95. Chris Kraft was the agency’s first flight director and managed all of the Mercury missions, as well some of the Gemini flights. He was a senior planner during the Apollo lunar program. Later he led the Johnson Space Center in Houston and oversaw development of the space shuttle.Anyone who has ever watched a rocket launch, marveled at the moon landings or seen the space station streak across the night sky can thank Kraft. “Chris Kraft really was the architect of mission control,” said Andrew Chaikin, who has written extensively about the space program. He says Kraft is synonymous with NASA, having directed some of the most important missions in the agency’s history including NASA’s first manned launch in 1961.It was a short, 15-minute suborbital flight piloted by Alan Shepard. A recording of the controllers during the mission captures Kraft coolly talking to his colleagues. In a 2015 NPR interview, Kraft said he might have sounded cool, “but I was shaking like a leaf. I wasn’t too bad after the first one. But that first one was something else.”During the 1960s, NASA was full of ideas and energy as the agency rushed to meet the end-of-decade challenge to land humans on the moon. The organization took risks and succeeded, in large part because of Kraft.He was a quick study (he finished his aeronautical engineering degree at Virginia Tech in two years). He joined NASA not long after it was created in 1958 and helped design a space program from scratch. It was a mighty undertaking. There were so many things he had to think through — like developing a communications system that would allow him to speak to the crew every 15 minutes. “What do I have to do to do that?” he asked, “Well, I had to build a whole damn worldwide network which had never been before. That, in itself, was quite a job.”In addition to the technical, he had to put together his team: dozens of controllers who monitored the astronauts and their spacecraft — anything to do with the mission. Chaikin said, “He was the general in battle with his troops and, you know, he had to coordinate all of them. He had to digest all these bits of data that were coming at him from all these different systems, all these different flight controllers.”“When I gave them the job,” Kraft recalled, “I said it’s your job to now take this on and get it done. I’m not going to stand behind you and push you. You come up with your ideas on how to do it.”His leadership was tested after the Apollo 1 launchpad fire in 1967. Three astronauts died during a countdown rehearsal. Kraft said he wrestled with whether the rush to the moon ultimately killed the crew. “We allowed the poor workmanship to happen,” he said. “That was unforgivable, frankly. That we knew it was happening. We weren’t willing to stop the wheels to fix it.” He said he never got over the disaster.After he retired in 1982, Kraft complained about the high cost of developing the next generation of rockets and NASA’s plans to land humans on asteroids, and he lamented the loss of shuttles Challenger and Columbia.Recalling the 1986 Challenger explosion, he seemed to still think of himself as part of the team, saying, “We weren’t willing on the shuttle to fix the O-rings in the boosters. We weren’t willing to take the damn system by the hand and fix it before we said we were going to fly. … We had a creed in Mercury that we came up with and that said we will never fly with a known problem that will kill us. Never. … We did on the shuttle. … That was unforgivable.”Still, he was proud of what he was able to accomplish, and pushed for more. He said, “We need to have that curiosity. We need to have that innate feeling of be ready. Be prepared. It pays off in success.” Kraft thought NASA had stopped being bold after the moon missions. He said, “We didn’t do the follow-on and we could have and we should have.”Many of his original ideas remain in use today. In fact, Mission Control Center in Houston is named after him. And he told NPR he had flown in space himself, sort of.“I flew on every flight — vicariously. I didn’t have to go. I mean that. I used to tell people back then when we’re flying, I have this feeling that’s what we’re doing all the time. And then when we stop flying, I don’t believe we did it. That was a strange feeling. … I was in my revelry when we were flying. My people were the same way. It was such a tremendous pleasure out of making things happen well and safely and knowing that they were contributing to that part of the program. I think it was extremely important to all of us and that was our payoff. We didn’t make any money working for the government. But we sure got a hell of a lot of enjoyment out of it.”Kraft never saw a launch with his own eyes. He was either working the mission or, later in life, watching from home on television.Copyright 2019 NPR. To see more, visit https://www.npr.org.last_img read more