Tag:

宁波高端SPA

Burlington Police Chief Schirling testifies before Senate panel

first_imgStatement Of Senator Patrick Leahy (D-Vt.),Chairman, Senate Judiciary Committee,Hearing On Encouraging Innovative and Cost-Effective Crime Reduction StrategiesMarch 3, 2010Today, the Committee returns to the critical issue of finding the best strategies for reducing crime.  I chaired a hearing in the last Congress on this issue, and we now consider what the next steps can and should be. We will hear about innovative approaches that are working in police departments and criminal justice systems across the country, and examine what the Federal Government can do to encourage the adoption of approaches that work to keep our communities safe.  I hope we can make bipartisan progress on this issue.  We all want to effectively and efficiently reduce crime and keep our neighborhoods safe.In the 1990s, with the leadership of then-Senator Joe Biden and others, we passed legislation to create and fund the COPS program and other important initiatives, which put thousands of new officers on the street and encouraged innovative policing strategies.  Law enforcement leaders in cities and towns throughout the country, bolstered by this national support, revolutionized the way policing was done throughout the country.  These efforts led to the unprecedented drops in violent crime we saw during the 1990s.That progress stalled in the last decade as Federal funding for state and local law enforcement dried up, and Federal attention to finding the best approaches to reducing crime wavered.  Rates of crime stayed largely stagnant, despite skyrocketing incarceration rates, and some communities saw significant resurgences in violent crime. One of the factors that prevented the crime problem from worsening in the last decade was continuing innovation at the local level.  Enterprising police chiefs, hard working law enforcement officers, judges and community leaders worked together to find new and more effective crime reduction strategies, and many communities saw this work pay good dividends. The economic downturn has put an even greater strain on our communities efforts to keep crime rates down.  In response to this growing crisis, Congress and the President acted decisively, including $4 billion in Federal assistance to state and local law enforcement in last year s stimulus legislation.  I fought hard for that funding, and the results are already being felt.  Crime rates are coming down as police departments are adding or retaining officers and implementing new initiatives.Even with this help, though, police departments and criminal justice systems remain short on resources.  More money alone will not solve the problem.  It is important that cities and towns use their resources in the ways that have been proven to work best.We will hear today from leaders in the field who have been setting good examples for how our communities can make their law enforcement and crime reduction efforts work well.  Chief Mike Schirling from Burlington, Vermont, has brought significant innovation to a small city police force.  He has implemented comprehensive community policing and partnerships with all levels of law enforcement and with schools and community groups.  He is exploring the use of alternative sanctions to set low-level offenders on the right path before they enter the criminal justice system, targeted programs to address mental health needs, consolidation of resources to help police departments function more efficiently, and the use of new technology to share information more effectively.Chief Rodney Monroe has made great progress in Richmond and now Charlotte with initiatives like using technology to pinpoint law enforcement efforts and integrating law enforcement with economic development and job training.  Colonel Dean Esserman has made Providence into a national leader in community-based policing.  Chief Patrick Berarducci has also brought innovation to a small city police force.There are good examples from across the country.  Cities like Los Angeles and Chicago are seeing results with gang outreach and mediation initiatives.  Thinkers on crime reduction strategy like Jeremy Travis and David Kennedy with the National Network for Safe Communities have helped communities throughout the country effectively tackle intractable crime problems.  The HOPE program in Hawaii has shown that probation supervision with swift and certain consequences can greatly reduce recidivism.  Many jurisdictions have had great success with juvenile prevention and reentry programs.Today s witnesses come from communities that look like much of America and prove that innovative and effective crime reduction approaches are not restricted to the biggest cities with the greatest resources.  I hope that by highlighting these successes, we can encourage other communities to follow their lead.I believe the Federal Government can and must help by spreading the word about strategies that work, and also by targeted funding and support.  We have seen in Burlington and in many other cities that an initial Federal investment can make possible initiatives that would not be possible otherwise.  These programs are inexpensive and cost effective.  Over time, they should more than pay for themselves by reducing the costs of crime, improving local economies and creating jobs, and reducing the need for federal assistance. I know there is disagreement about Federal support for state and local law enforcement.  I hope there can be broad bipartisan agreement on supporting cost effective strategies that work to keep our communities safer.Source: LEahy’s office. 3.2.2010# # # # # Burlington Police Chief Michael E Schirling testified Tuesday afternoon before a congressional panel chaired by Senator Patrick Leahy (D-VT).  Leahy invited Schirling to testify at a Senate Judiciary Committee hearing on Encouraging Innovative and Cost-Effective Crime Reduction Strategies.Leahy has made state and local law enforcement issues a priority for the Judiciary Committee this Congress.  He dedicated the first hearing of the 111th Congress to examining the needs of state and local law enforcement.  Last year, Leahy worked to secure $4 billion in the American Recovery and Reinvestment Act (ARRA) for state and local law enforcement, including the successful Community Oriented Policing Services (COPS) program.  Twenty-five police departments in Vermont were recipients of COPS funding included in the ARRA.  In 2008, Leahy twice brought the Judiciary Committee to Vermont to hear testimony about community efforts to address crime. We have seen in Burlington and in many other cities that an initial Federal investment can make possible initiatives that would not be possible otherwise, Leahy said at the hearing.  These programs are inexpensive and cost effective.  Over time, they should more than pay for themselves by reducing the costs of crime, improving local economies, creating jobs, and reducing the need for federal assistance.  Schirling testified about the Burlington Police Department s success in developing and enhancing community policing.  Over the last 11 years, our policing paradigm shifted from a response-based model to one embracing the core tenets of community policing partnership and problem solving with an eye toward preventing crime and mitigating disorder on our streets and in our neighborhoods, said Schirling.   We believe that critical law enforcement innovation can occur not just in traditional policing endeavors, but also in other areas. Chief Schirling has brought significant innovation to a small city police force, said Leahy.  He has implemented comprehensive community policing and partnerships with all levels of law enforcement and with schools and community groups.Police departments across the country are facing cutbacks in resources and funding during difficult economic times, and are increasingly looking to local business and community organizations to help identify and implement innovative strategies to address violence and crime.Audio and video footage will be available later this afternoon.An archived webcast will be available online later today. # # # # #last_img read more

AYC 2013:Nigeria beat Mali to claim bronze

first_imgNigeria made amends for missing out on defending their title by beating Mali 2-1 to finish with bronze at the 2013 Orange CAF U-20 Championship.By reaching the semi-finals both teams qualified for FIFA U-20 World Cup and for the greater part of the match cantered their way through the stages with odd flashes of constructive football here and there during a match played at Ahmed Zabana stadium in Oran.A brace from striker Aminu Umar ensured that it was The Flying Eagles and not The Eaglets who claimed third spot in the competition.Mali scored a late goal on 87th minute through Tiekoro Keita to make it an interesting end but it was Nigeria’s night.It was an Adama Niane goal that won it for Mali the last time these two meet and the same striker had the first meaningful chance of the game with a header from a corner kick.The Nigerian defenders manage to scrabble if off the goal line.Nigeria then went to the other end of the pitch and good interchange play between Chidi Osuchukwu and Abdullahi Shehu released Abduljeleel Ajagun who shot was on target but well saved by Ali Yirango in goal for Mali.Perhaps the best action in the first half came in the 40th minute from impressive Abdoulaye Keita who picked up striker Hamidou Traore with a delightful 40m long ball into the box. Traore took it down well with his right foot before shooting with the other only to see Nigerian goalkeeper, Jonah Usman beat away the shot.Keita was not finished and delighted the crowd a minute later when he ran past his marker before letting a rocket of a shot that again needed Usman at his best to prevent Mali taking the lead.In the 72nd minute an intelligent cut back from a free kick picked up Ajagun on the edge of box, while everyone was expecting a cross.Ajagun’s well taken shot was blocked on goal line but Aminu Umar reacted quickest to stab home the opening goal of the match.Boasted by the goal Nigeria were in ascendancy and on 82nd minute Umar scored his and Nigeria’s second from the penalty spot. It Umar who was fouled by Boubacar Diarra as he jumped for a high ball in the box. The striker picked himself up and sent Yirango the wrong way but Mali refused to lie down and mounted a late charge.On 87th minute winger Tiekoro Keita scored after keeper Usman had spilt a shot.It was Mali in a hurry to get an equalizer and it almost came a minute from the end when pressure on Nigeria goal left Hamidou Traore with a chance to score but he hurried his attempt and it sailed over the bar and Nigeria then hung on to finish thirdlast_img read more

FIFA and CONCACAF introduce club licensing in region

first_imgFIFA, in collaboration with CONCACAF, today held final discussions during a landmark seminar on club licensing in Miami. The main objective of the two-day event was to inform member associations about the implementation of the FIFA Club Licensing System in CONCACAF that will introduce a set of minimum criteria into national and continental competitions from 2015 and 2016, respectively.FIFA Vice-President and CONCACAF President Jeffrey Webb opened the seminar by stressing the importance of club licensing for the future of football in the region: “This seminar is a continuation of everything we do for the professionalisation and the transparency of football. The member associations must be the agents of change, the catalysts for the transformation of CONCACAF.”FIFA’s Club Licensing System is based on five key criteria: sporting, personnel and administrative, financial, infrastructure and legal. These criteria aim to safeguard the credibility and integrity of club competitions while improving the level of professionalism within the football family and promoting transparency in the finances, ownership and control of clubs.The adaptation of club licensing at confederation and subsequently at member association level is a long-term process in which the objective is to provide essential requirements and minimum standards to further enhance club football competitions. At the end of this process, the benefits for clubs, leagues and member associations are numerous: higher level of club management, better level of home-grown players, higher level of play, increase of fans and revenues, and ultimately, better level of the national team.“The FIFA Club Licensing System will raise the level of club football, both on and off the pitch, and represents a long-term development tool for FIFA member associations. Therefore, FIFA fully supports each confederation and member association implementing the FIFA Club Licensing System,” said FIFA Secretary General Jérôme Valcke.The member associations of Anguilla, Antigua & Barbuda, Aruba, Bahamas, Barbados, Belize, Bermuda, British Virgin Islands, Canada, Cayman Islands, Costa Rica, Cuba, Curaçao, Dominica, Dominican Republic, El Salvador, Grenada, Guatemala, Guyana, Haiti, Honduras, Jamaica, Mexico, Montserrat, Nicaragua, Panama, Puerto Rico, St Kitts & Nevis, St Lucia, St Vincent & the Grenadines, Suriname, Trinidad & Tobago, Turks & Caicos Islands, US Virgin Islands and USA were represented at the seminar. The participants attended presentations by FIFA and CONCACAF which laid out the basis for the implementation of club licensing by the members, as well as panel discussions involving famous figures of the region’s football such as Shaka Hislop (TV analyst and former Trinidad & Tobago player), Yon De Luisa (CEO of Club América) and Cheryl Bailey (US NWSL) and representatives of member associations.While the AFC and UEFA have already established a club licensing system on their respective continents, FIFA is planning to organise further seminars in the CAF, CONMEBOL and OFC regions to ensure that the FIFA Club Licensing System operates in all corners of worldlast_img read more