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Photo: N.C. State’s Abdul-Malik Abu Kept His Promise To Chapel Hill Shooting Victim

first_imgAbdul-Malik Abu at a friend's wedding.N.C. State freshman forward Abdul-Malik Abu was very close with Deah Shaddy Barakat, one of the victims of the Chapel Hill shooting earlier this month. In the wake of the tragedy, Abu posted a touching tribute to Barakat, his wife and her sister on Instagram. At Barakat’s wedding in December, Abu vowed he would beat UNC and Duke for his friend, a die-hard N.C. State fan. Barakat posted this photo to remind Abu after the Wolfpack upset Duke last month. “I’m gonna beat Duke and UNC for you as my wedding gift” @malikabuA photo posted by @arabprodigy0 on Jan 11, 2015 at 12:47pm PST On Tuesday, N.C. State stunned rival North Carolina in Chapel Hill. Abu made sure to let his friend know that he had fulfilled his promise, even if he was no longer alive to see him do it. Thanks Deah for being a special person to all of us. This one was for you your family and and the wonderful people of #WPN !!!!! Love you man #RIP #WeDidIt  #iPromisedYouManA photo posted by Abdul-Malik Abu (@malikabu) on Feb 24, 2015 at 7:07pm PSTWhat an awesome way for Abu to keep his friend’s memory alive.[ SBNation ]last_img read more

Guardian Life Awards Top Boy and Girl Scholarships

first_img Grace-Lee Bolt and Alex Gray are this year’s recipients of Guardian Life Limited’s Grade Six Achievement Test (GSAT) Top Girl and Boy scholarships. The students, who will be attending St. Andrew High School for Girls and Campion College in September, have received $250,000 each, to cover the full five-year period of study at secondary school. Story Highlights Since 2005, Guardian Life Limited established a GSAT Scholarship programme for the benefit of the top-performing boy and girl from a list of applicants comprising children/legal wards of policyholders. Grace-Lee Bolt and Alex Gray are this year’s recipients of Guardian Life Limited’s Grade Six Achievement Test (GSAT) Top Girl and Boy scholarships.The students, who will be attending St. Andrew High School for Girls and Campion College in September, have received $250,000 each, to cover the full five-year period of study at secondary school.They were presented with their awards, which included a gift basket and a certificate, during a ceremony held today (August 23), at Guardian Life’s head office on Trafalgar Road in St. Andrew.Eight children of employees also benefited from $250,000, each under a programme launched by Guardian Life, which will cover the full five-year period at secondary school.In addition to the GSAT scholarships, the entity has provided grants valued at $25,000 each to 11 staff members’ children who sat the examination. Six students from the Denham Town, Alpha and Duhaney Park Primary schools received grants valued at $30,000 each, while four students received tertiary scholarships valued at $300,000 each for a period of three years.In his remarks, President of Guardian Life Limited, Eric Hosin, lauded the outstanding performance of the students.He said it is important for the scholars to not only understand and appreciate the value of a solid education, but to also enjoy themselves while seeking knowledge.“You need to enjoy life too, and I want to encourage our parents to allow our children to do so… ; while they have to do their studies (also) allow them to enjoy life”, he urged.He encouraged the recipients to manage their time effectively, to focus on their goals, and to choose their friends wisely.In the meantime, he encouraged parents to be active members of their school’s parent-teacher association.“Get involved with the school and know what is going on. Most of the child’s life is going to be formed inside of that school environment, and if the school is bad and you are not there to help it, you are part of the problem,” he said.He said this year, the company disbursed scholarships and grants valued at approximately $4 million to children of policyholders and employees of the company.“It is a way of giving back to our policyholders and the society. A lot of what we give also is to needy children, and what you see here is just a representation,” he said, adding that assistance is provided islandwide.For her part, Chief Executive Officer, NexxStepp Personal Development, Tishauna Mullings, urged the students to serve as ambassadors of positivity.In her response, Grace-Lee thanked Guardian Life for the scholarship and enriching the lives of the recipients.“By awarding me the Guardian Life scholarship, you are enabling me to continue to excel and focus on what is truly important – my education,” she said.Expressing gratitude, Alex said the funds will assist in offsetting expenses throughout the secondary level.“This scholarship is now my litmus and my beacon, a permanent reminder that with discipline and hard work, one can do anything that they choose to set their mind on doing,” he said.For his part, Tertiary Scholar, Phillip Bushay, said investment in young minds will benefit the students and country.“With the current investments taking place in our country, it is good to know that we have a company like Guardian Life, not just investing in physical assets and material stuff but also investing in young minds,” he said.Since 2005, Guardian Life Limited established a GSAT Scholarship programme for the benefit of the top-performing boy and girl from a list of applicants comprising children/legal wards of policyholders.The selection is based on criteria established by the Ministry of Education, Youth and Information and is administered through the Ministry. The scholarships go to the top performers who are not the recipients of any other award.last_img read more

Wynne There may be more money for onreserve education

first_imgAPTN National NewsThe province of Ontario got a surprise last week. The economist they’d hired to help balance their books, Don Drummond, recommended cutbacks in every single government department — except for First Nations education.Ontario’s Minister of Aboriginal Affairs, Kathleen Wynne, agrees with Drummond, and is calling on the federal government to work with Ontario to “upgrade the education on reserve for First Nations kids”.last_img

Breathing through the nose improves memory consolidation

first_img Source:https://ki.se/en/news/breathing-through-the-nose-aids-memory-storage Reviewed by Alina Shrourou, B.Sc. (Editor)Oct 22 2018The way we breathe may affect how well our memories are consolidated (i.e. reinforced and stabilized). If we breathe through the nose rather than the mouth after trying to learn a set of smells, we remember them better, researchers at Karolinska Institutet in Sweden report in The Journal of Neuroscience.Research into how breathing affects the brain has become an ever-more popular field in recent years and new methodologies have enabled more studies, many of which have concentrated on the memory. Researchers from Karolinska Institutet now show that participants who breathe through the nose consolidate their memories better.”Our study shows that we remember smells better if we breathe through the nose when the memory is being consolidated – the process that takes place between learning and memory retrieval,” says Artin Arshamian, researcher at the Department of Clinical Neuroscience, Karolinska Institutet. “This is the first time someone has demonstrated this.”Related StoriesResearchers report how a popular antidepressant drug could rewire the brainResearch sheds light on sun-induced DNA damage and repairSchwann cells capable of generating protective myelin over nerves finds researchOne reason why this phenomenon has not previously been available for study is that the most common laboratory animals – rats and mice – cannot breathe naturally through their mouths.For the study, the researchers had participants learn twelve different smells on two separate occasions. They were then asked to either breathe through their noses or mouths for one hour. When the time was up, the participants were presented with the old as well as a new set of twelve smells, and asked to say if each one was from the learning session or new.The results showed that when the participants breathed through their noses between the time of learning and recognition, they remembered the smells better.New method facilitates measuring activity in the brain”The next step is to measure what actually happens in the brain during breathing and how this is linked to memory,” says Dr Arshamian. “This was previously a practical impossibility as electrodes had to be inserted directly into the brain. We’ve managed to get round this problem and now we’re developing, with my colleague Johan Lundström, a new means of measuring activity in the olfactory bulb and brain without having to insert electrodes.”Earlier research has shown that the receptors in the olfactory bulb detect not only smells but also variations in the airflow itself. In the different phases of inhalation and exhalation, different parts of the brain are activated. But how the synchronization of breathing and brain activity happens and how it affects the brain and therefore our behavior is unknown. Traditional medicine has often, however, stressed the importance of breathing.”The idea that breathing affects our behavior is actually not new,” says Dr Arshamian. “In fact, the knowledge has been around for thousands of years in such areas as meditation. But no one has managed to prove scientifically what actually goes on in the brain. We now have tools that can reveal new clinical knowledge.”last_img read more

Older adults with CVD more likely to experience rapid functional decline

first_imgReviewed by Alina Shrourou, B.Sc. (Editor)Nov 21 2018In a Journal of the American Geriatrics Society study of adults aged 65 and older who were functionally independent, individuals with cardiovascular disease (CVD) were more likely to experience rapid functional decline than those without.For the 392 individuals with CVD in the study, three distinct trajectories of function emerged over a four-year follow-up period: stable function (32.0 percent), gradual functional decline (44.2 percent), and rapid functional decline (23.8 percent). Similar trajectories were seen for those without CVD, with a smaller proportion in the rapid functional decline group (16.2 percent). Those who were women, older, and had less education and greater comorbidity were especially likely to experience rapid functional decline.”The risk factors identified in this study may be used by clinicians to identify older adults with CVD who would benefit from functional screening and intervention to deter further decline,” said lead author Dr. Tamra Keeney, of the MGH Institute of Health Professions. “Future work should investigate additional factors that are associated with rapid functional decline in late life as well as interventions that can lead to functional improvement in this high-risk group.”​ Source:https://newsroom.wiley.com/press-release/journal-american-geriatrics-society/cardiovascular-disease-may-increase-risk-rapid-funlast_img read more