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Burlington Airport Announces Plans to Add Parking

first_img$45 million project would add two floors and 1,400 spaces without taxpayer costAt a press conference on Wednesday, February 11, 2009, Brian Searles, Director of Aviation at Burlington International Airport, unveiled plans for a major expansion to the airport s parking facilities. The need for additional parking at the airport has become acute, said Searles. Enplanements for Calendar Year 2008 were up 7.3% over 2007. In 2008, the existing garage was filled to capacity at least once nearly every day from February through October. Searles added that when the primary lot is full, vehicles must be moved to the Park & Shuttle location, or even to off-site temporary lots. The result is inconvenience to customers and lost revenue.To be completed in phases, the new project would ultimately add two floors and 1,400 parking spaces. The addition will also incorporate a variety of creative energy-efficiency features. The phases are scalable, depending on economic conditions. The full build-out cost for the project is estimated to be $45 million. To pay for the construction, the airport is asking Burlington to seek voter approval in March for a Revenue Supported General Obligation Bond.Searles added, It is critical to understand that this project will not result in any increase in Burlington area residents taxes. I can t stress that strongly enough. The project will produce sufficient revenue increase to repay the bond without raising taxes. Searles also noted that voter approval does not commit the city to actual sale of the bonds, nor to spending at any particular level.Source: Burlington International Airportlast_img read more

Familiar faces, young talent providing scoring spark

first_imgHead Coach Mark Johnson knew it would be more of a challenge for the Wisconsin women’s hockey team to score goals this year. After netting 170 goals in 38 games last year, the Badgers lost 62 of those scores in the form of departing players. Everyone, especially the freshmen, had to step up their game and produce goals. Through the season’s first five games, the team has done exactly that.Wisconsin hasn’t missed a beat from last season, when the team averaged around 4.5 goals per game. This year’s squad is averaging four goals per game, with 18 goals in the past four games. The team has done well to replace their former teammates, especially the freshmen, who have used their speed and enthusiasm to make up for the lack of college playing experience. New Badgers Angie Keseley, Erika Lawler and Tia Hanson have stepped in nicely, combining to tally 10 points in their first five games of collegiate play.However, a key part of goal production this year has come from a pair of familiar faces, junior Sara Bauer and senior Sharon Cole. The two play on the same line and feed off of each other’s skill. The duo had a pretty passing exchange that resulted in a goal for Cole against Vermont and another great play when Cole scored off another feed from Bauer against Minnesota State last weekend. Bauer, a prolific goal scorer, has already collected 10 points in only five games this season. Cole, the team captain, has recorded six points thus far. “We’ve played together for a while, so we know how each other plays and works position-wise,” Cole said of her playing with Bauer. “I think we just compliment each other well with passing and getting [the puck] on net.”The freshmen have also stepped up to provide a reliable source of goals. Lawler, who stands at only five feet tall, uses her speed to disrupt defenses and create scoring opportunities and breakaways. She has collected three points in the season, scoring her first goal of the season in the opening series against Minnesota-Duluth. She has created numerous scoring chances for herself and her teammates, although a goal against Minnesota State was taken away due to the net being knocked out of position.Freshmen forwards Hanson, Keseley and Kayla Hagen have also all seen significant playing time and have performed well. Hanson and Keseley created a two-player breakaway last Saturday against Minnesota State, with Hanson scoring in the third period to give the Badgers a 3–1 lead.”The freshmen are doing well,” Johnson said. “They’re still getting their feet wet in regards to college hockey and getting used to being a college student … but I like the team we have and the offensive chances we’re creating.”One negative aspect of the Badgers’ offense is the lack of production from the powerplay. The Badgers were 0-for-7 on the powerplay Saturday against Minnesota State and are just 1-for-15 in the past three games.However, Johnson isn’t worried about the powerplay just yet. He knows that it’s difficult at first for the players to read each other and anticipate what their teammates will do. This is especially true with the special teams units, where it takes time for a squad to come together. Johnson is confident that this will happen with time.”We were 0-for-7 up at Mankato, and that’s something that we have to work on … some people have to get used to one another and the chemistry has to develop,” Johnson said. “We did some pretty good things (on the powerplay), we just didn’t score. We got the puck in (the offensive zone) and moved it around pretty well … we’ll work on the powerplay tomorrow (in practice) quite a bit and get the girls ready for Friday afternoon … so we should be able to create more scoring chances.”The Badgers will face the North Dakota Fighting Sioux Friday at 2:07 at the Kohl Center. Like last week’s matchup against Minnesota State, the team expects another tough physical battle this weekend.”You can expect a physical battle out of all the WCHA teams, everybody wants to get that conference win,” Cole said. “Especially against us; we have pretty good speed so teams tend to be physical to slow us down.”last_img read more

Latino groups discuss education gap

first_imgThis year, the topic of the Dia De Los Muertos event was Latinos in Education. Speakers discussed the “death” of education that many individuals in the Latino community face and highlighted the barriers that Latinos experience in their personal lives and professional work in their pursuit of higher education.“The goal is to educate our fellow USC students about the struggles and to discuss solutions that may help bridge the gap from the minority communities and public schools towards Universities like USC,” said Joanna Burga, a graduate student studying social work and one of the organizers of the event, in an e-mail to the Daily Trojan.Dia de los Muertos, or Day of the Dead, refers to the holiday that is celebrated throughout Latin America and is most strongly associated with Mexican culture. The festival is celebrated from Oct. 31 to Nov. 2 every year and honors the deceased by celebrating with food, drinks and activities that they enjoyed in life. The holiday recognizes death as a natural part of the human life and experience; therefore, the dead are invited to celebrate and take part in the festivities.The organizing committee, in order to meet the event’s goal, wanted to include individuals who had worked with education in the Latino community in various levels. The panel discussion featured Monica Garcia, LAUSD School Board member; William Vela, director of El Centro Chicano; and Carlos Ruiz, a master’s student studying social work.“We reached out to Billy Vella because we know that through working in El Centro Chicano, he is highly connected with the undergraduate Latino students at USC interested in linking those students with other Latino students who are in graduate and Ph.D. programs to promote higher education as well, which we think is important,” said Jon Vales, co-chair of the Latinos in Social Work Caucus, in an e-mail to the Daily Trojan.Data has shown that Latinos comprise more than 38 percent of the California population, but they attend college in the lowest numbers compared to other ethnic groups. The Latinos in Social Work Caucus wanted to address this issue with the panelists they chose for the event.“It was important for us to be able to have dialogue with someone who was one of the main players in the Los Angeles Unified School District: Monica Garcia was another person that we thought would add another element into this discussion as she actually is an alumni from the USC School of Social Work,” Vales said in an e-mail to the Daily Trojan.The event began with the ceremonial blowing of the conch to welcome the ancestors, followed by the welcome song. The audience interacted with the panelists and put forth an array of questions regarding the education system, obstacles and how to overcome them successfully. Panelists discussed the ways of overcoming obstacles students face in education. The panelists felt that by reducing the number of students in a school and increasing the number of schools, the attention a child gets from his or her teacher might improve, resulting in better quality education. Members of the audience expressed that attending USC would open a new world to them.The participants also celebrated the festival by putting up pictures and mementos to honor people who had died. The audience included Latino students, graduate students and many students from the social work department.“Celebrating Dia De Los Muertos is a way of thanking the ancestors who enrich our lives,” said Paul Maiden, executive vice dean of academic and student affairs at the School of Social Work, at the event.The altar arranged by the students as a part of the festival is available for viewing in the El Centro Chicano office in the Student Union building. The Latino/a Social Work Caucus, in collaboration with the Latino Graduate Student Association and El Centro Chicano, hosted its annual event in celebration of the holiday of Dia de los Muertos on Tuesday.RIP · LAUSD Board member Monica Garcia (left), William Vela, director of El Centro Chicano (center) and student Carlos Reyes-Ruiz speak Tuesday. – Mariya Dondonyan | Daily Trojanlast_img read more

LeBron James, Lakers blow out Rockets with second-half surge

first_imgPreviousHouston Rockets coach Mike D’Antoni yells at an official after a foul call during the second half of the team’s NBA basketball game against the Los Angeles Lakers on Saturday, Jan. 18, 2020, in Houston. (AP Photo/Michael Wyke)Los Angeles Lakers forwards Kyle Kuzma (0) and LeBron James (23) celebrate the team’s impending win over the Houston Rockets, in the final minute of an NBA basketball game Saturday, Jan. 18, 2020, in Houston. (AP Photo/Michael Wyke)Houston Rockets guard Russell Westbrook (0) lays up a shot past Los Angeles Lakers forward Kyle Kuzma, right, during the second half of an NBA basketball game Saturday, Jan. 18, 2020, in Houston. (AP Photo/Michael Wyke) SoundThe gallery will resume insecondsLos Angeles Lakers forward LeBron James (23) grabs Houston Rockets guard James Harden (13) after a rebound during the first half of an NBA basketball game Saturday, Jan. 18, 2020, in Houston. (AP Photo/Michael Wyke)Los Angeles Lakers forward LeBron James (23) works to the basket around Houston Rockets guard James Harden, left, during the second half of an NBA basketball game Saturday, Jan. 18, 2020, in Houston. (AP Photo/Michael Wyke)Los Angeles Lakers guard Kentavious Caldwell-Pope talks with referee Tony Brown about a call during the first half of the team’s NBA basketball game against the Houston Rockets on Saturday, Jan. 18, 2020, in Houston. (AP Photo/Michael Wyke)Los Angeles Lakers forward LeBron James (23) drives in front of Houston Rockets center Clint Capela (15) and forward PJ Tucker during the first half of an NBA basketball game Saturday, Jan. 18, 2020, in Houston. (AP Photo/Michael Wyke)Los Angeles Lakers forward LeBron James (23) bumps Houston Rockets guard James Harden (13) as he drives to the basket during the first half of an NBA basketball game Saturday, Jan. 18, 2020, in Houston. (AP Photo/Michael Wyke)Los Angeles Lakers center JaVale McGee (7) drives between Houston Rockets center Clint Capela, left, and guard James Harden during the first half of an NBA basketball game Saturday, Jan. 18, 2020, in Houston. (AP Photo/Michael Wyke)Houston Rockets guard James Harden, right, shoots next to Los Angeles Lakers forward Kyle Kuzma (0) during the second half of an NBA basketball game Saturday, Jan. 18, 2020, in Houston. (AP Photo/Michael Wyke)Los Angeles Lakers forward Kyle Kuzma (0) knocks over Houston Rockets forward PJ Tucker, right, on a drive to the basket during the second half of an NBA basketball game Saturday, Jan. 18, 2020, in Houston. (AP Photo/Michael Wyke)Los Angeles Lakers forward LeBron James (23) reaches in as Houston Rockets guard Russell Westbrook tries to keep control of the ball during the second half of an NBA basketball game Saturday, Jan. 18, 2020, in Houston. (AP Photo/Michael Wyke)Houston Rockets coach Mike D’Antoni yells at an official after a foul call during the second half of the team’s NBA basketball game against the Los Angeles Lakers on Saturday, Jan. 18, 2020, in Houston. (AP Photo/Michael Wyke)Los Angeles Lakers forwards Kyle Kuzma (0) and LeBron James (23) celebrate the team’s impending win over the Houston Rockets, in the final minute of an NBA basketball game Saturday, Jan. 18, 2020, in Houston. (AP Photo/Michael Wyke)NextShow Caption1 of 12Los Angeles Lakers forwards Kyle Kuzma (0) and LeBron James (23) celebrate the team’s impending win over the Houston Rockets, in the final minute of an NBA basketball game Saturday, Jan. 18, 2020, in Houston. (AP Photo/Michael Wyke)ExpandHOUSTON — The chants started with just over five minutes left.The Lakers were leading by 16, and streams of red-clad fans were heading up the Toyota Center aisles. Emboldened, a remaining cadre of Lakers faithful filled the arena with shouting: “LET’S GO LAKERS!”Clad in a blazer, a gold polo and a pair of Chuck Taylors, injured All-Star forward Anthony Davis waved his fingers in time as if he were directing them. As the arena pumped music in to suppress them, the dissidents only got louder.The Lakers were impossible to drown out on Saturday night. Off the court as well as on it. Trail Blazers beat Grizzlies in play-in, earn first-round series with the Lakers Lakers, Clippers schedules set for first round of NBA playoffs AD Quality Auto 360p 720p 1080p Top articles1/5READ MOREUCLA alum Kenny Clark signs four-year contract extension with PackersLeBron James had 31 points and 12 assists, Kyle Kuzma added 23 points and the Lakers (34-8) pounded the Houston Rockets 124-115 with a second-half rally that blew the supporting fans out of the arena.James and Kuzma led a 65-50 second-half rally, and the Lakers tightened their defense on James Harden and Russell Westbrook, arguably the toughest offensive backcourt duo in the NBA. While the two Houston stars combined for 69 points, the Rockets’ bench struggled while the Lakers’ own reserves helped push them to 4-1 in this most recent stretch without Davis.The only loss, a one-point defeat to Orlando on Wednesday that snapped their nine-game win streak, seemed to chafe them.“We hated the loss that we had the other night against Orlando,” James said. “We had a couple days to just reshape, refocus and start the second half of the season the right way, and we did that tonight.”A physical first half made the Lakers seem destined for a 48-minute mudfight. The Rockets (26-15) made James muscle in for his drives against defensive bulwark P.J. Tucker and ruthlessly chased 3-point shooters off the free-throw line. The Lakers were just 4 for 14 from long range in the first half, and James – playing again without Davis – had only one other teammate (Danny Green, 10 points) in double figures after the first half. The Lakers’ rally seized on several momentum-shifting plays, including back-to-back blocked shots by JaVale McGee that helped energize the crowd and spur a 32-17 third-quarter advantage.That sequence included a celebration by McGee which earned him a technical foul, one of three the Lakers were surprised to receive on the evening (including one for Davis on the bench). But they also felt it was part of the formula, along with the crowd and the energy they had on the court, that kept them churning along atop the Western Conference.James might as well have had the chants still ringing in his ears as he packed to leave.“It’s something that you really can’t explain unless you’re involved in it,” James said after the Lakers improved to an NBA-best 18-3 on the road. “We love the Laker faithful when we’re in Staples Center or when they travel with us. Tonight they showed (themselves) and we just tried to give it back to them by performing the way we did on the floor.” Lakers practice early hoping to answer all questions center_img Trail Blazers, Grizzlies advance to NBA play-in game; Suns, Spurs see playoff dreams dashed Newsroom GuidelinesNews TipsContact UsReport an Error The other end wasn’t looking promising, either, as the Lakers couldn’t wall off the bruising drives of Westbrook, who backed down defenders at will to the tune of 22 first-half points (16 in the paint). With Harden also getting to the free-throw line, the Lakers looked taxed and in need of a second star to contend.They didn’t need one, as Kuzma scored 17 of his 23 points in the second half. Kentavious Caldwell-Pope also scored 20, as the Lakers’ guards found a rhythm back-cutting Houston’s Clint Capela for 54 points in the paint.But the biggest change was defense. The Lakers tweaked their trap scheme on Harden, the league’s leading scorer, to force him to pass out to his supporting cast. Those players weren’t able to punish the Lakers: Eric Gordon and Danuel House combined for 23 points, the only points the reserves scored, and none of the other Houston starters finished in double figures.Double-teaming Harden was a unique scheme the Lakers had only practiced on Friday, the day before the game. Green said that experience helped carry them through.“If you haven’t done it all year, even if you have practiced, it’s tough to make an adjustment on the fly,” he said. “You can do it in film, but when you have veterans like we have on this team, it’s easier … because guys have been doing it for some time in this league. We kind of trust each other.”The other adjustment was having Kuzma defend Westbrook. While Westbrook found the strength to back down Caldwell-Pope and Alex Caruso, moving the 6-foot-9 Kuzma was not as simple. It took away post touches that Westbrook had been using to carve up the Lakers in the first half.“Just try to keep him in front, take tough shots and just not foul,” Kuzma said. “These guys, they look for fouls. And if you keep them off the line, it bodes pretty well for you.”Harden and Westbrook ended up taking a combined 27 free throws, but just 12 were in the second half.Related Articles How athletes protesting the national anthem has evolved over 17 years last_img read more