Month:

December 2020

Wanted Jamaican Druglord Captured

first_imgBy Dialogo June 24, 2010 Christopher “Dudus” Coke, a Jamaican alleged druglord wanted to face trial in the United States, has been captured on the Caribbean island after a manhunt sparked bloodshed last month, police said. “The security forces wish to confirm reports that Christopher Lloyd Coke, for whom police is holding a warrant of arrest regarding extradition proceedings, was arrested this afternoon,” police commissioner Owen Ellington said. Local church leader Reverend Al Miller earlier told reporters he “helped in the process to hand over Coke.” Miller has helped in negotiations to ease tensions after a nearly week-long assault last month on a slum to capture Coke left 73 dead and divided the island nation. Jamaican police backed by troops descended on Coke’s stronghold of the impoverished Tivoli Gardens slum last month seeking to arrest him. Coke is wanted in the United States on drug trafficking charges, but he is also hailed by many residents as a Robin Hood figure who offers security and small-time jobs on some of the world’s toughest streets. Despite heavy security, house-to-house searches and a bloody shootout between security forces and armed Coke supporters, he managed to evade capture, amid rumors that he was either being sheltered on the island or had fled. Ellington had pledged a thorough investigation of all allegations and vowed to find Coke. But the unrest which saw the government declare a state of emergency left downtown Kingston deserted for days, and trapped many people in their homes with no food and water, as gun battles raged on the capital’s streets. Pictures of decaying corpses, masked gunmen and a fugitive drug don were a blow to Jamaica’s tourist image and home of late reggae star Bob Marley. Kingston has long had the dubious distinction of being one of the world’s murder capitals, and most tourists simply pass through the airport heading for its renowned beaches especially on the north coast. Tourism has been one bright spot in the economy since the island gained independence from Britain in 1962. After a slowdown during the financial crisis, Jamaica welcomed more than 200,000 tourists in March for the first time over a one-month period, according to the Tourism Board. In 2009, more than 1.8 million tourists visited Jamaica, which itself is home to only 2.8 million people, according to the board’s figures.last_img read more

Colombian Army kills ELN guerrilla leader Rito Ramón Barreto, also known as ‘Ranger’

first_img The loss of a guerrilla leader as important as Ranger is a huge loss for a terrorist organization such as the ELN, which engages in various criminal activities such as drug trafficking and money laundering, according to Rosanía Nestor, director of the Center for Studies in Security, Defense and International Affairs of Colombia (CESDAI). “Removing the Ranger represents a victory for the government because it will weaken its financial structure and its terrorist operations,” Nestor said. The ELN is different from other terrorist groups, such as the Revolutionary Armed Forces of Colombia, the security analyst said. “The ELN is a completely different terrorist organization from the FARC group in many ways; the FARC has such a large military force. Its active members are about 3,000 (terrorists) while the FARC has between 9,000 and 10,000 members.” Ranger participated in various terrorist activities in the municipality of Tame. In addition to working as chairman of the finance committee for the Jose Adonay Ardila Pinilla Front of the ELN, Ranger also was in charge of forcibly recruiting children in the region to join the terrorist group. Ranger was the primary suspect in the February killings of National Police officers Jose Delgado Parrado and Andres Castro Nico. They were both killed in the urban municipality of Sácama in Casanare. Ranger was an expert in explosives and handguns, and he had taken courses in political organizing. His area of operations was the area known as Tablon de Tame and the municipalities of Sácama, and Salina in the department of Casanare. During the military operation that resulted in Ranger’s death, troops seized an AR-15 rifle, a pistol, four grenades, a small computer, uniforms for security forces, and radio communications equipment. In past years, the ELN and the FARC have fought each other in the Tame area for control of criminal operations. “Both organizations wanted the territory to extort and kidnap people for ransom and for that reason they had several wars,” Nestor said. In recent years, the two terrorist groups have reached peace agreements. Currently, both the ELN and the FARC operate in the Tame region. Ranger coordinated financial transactions between the ELN and the FARC in the Casanare region. The ELN relies heavily on kidnapping and extortion to finance its criminal operations. The ELN targets local entrepreneurs as well as multinational corporations. The terrorist group sometimes kidnaps executives of international businesses which operate in Colombia. For example, in early 2013, ELN operatives kidnapped Gernot Wober, a Canadian mining engineer. captive for more than seven months. ELN terrorists kidnapped Wober, vice-president of exploration for Toronto-based Braeval Mining, on Jan. 18. The terrorists kidnapped him in the department of Bolivar, about 380 miles north of Bogotá. The ELN terrorists released Weber in August 2013. The Colombian Army registered an important security victory by killing National Liberation Army (ELN) terrorist Rito Ramón Barreto, who was also known as “Ranger” or “Creole. ” Ranger was the second-in-command of the Jose Adonay Ardila front. Army soldiers from the Mounted Cavalry Group Casanare Guides No. 16, assigned to the Sixteenth Brigade, killed Ranger during a fierce gun battle with the ELN in the departments of Casanare and Arauca on May 26, Gen. Jaime Alfonso Lasprilla told the press. Ranger was in charge of the finance committee of the Jose Adonay Ardila Pinilla Front. The killing of Ranger deals a strategic blow to the ELN, which engages in a wide range of criminal activities, including drug trafficking, extortion, kidnapping, and money laundering. Ranger started out with the ELN as a terrorist fighter. Over the years he worked his way up the ranks of the ELN. It is unusual for a terrorist leader to be involved in fighting, as Ranger was. “Usually the senior members of the guerrilla group may not be as close to military operations, to evade justice,” Nestor said. By Dialogo June 25, 2014 A big loss for ELN Ranger began as terrorist fighter Alliance between ELN and the FARC Julieta Pelcastre contributed to this story.last_img read more

Dominican Republic Navy Midshipmen Receive Training on ‘Maestro del Mar 2014’

first_img ARD fights drug trafficking A group of midshipmen from the Navy of the Dominican Republic (ARD) recently boarded a ship for a cruise in the beautiful waters of the Caribbean – but this was no vacation. This was Maestro del Mar 2014, a series of drills held from November 17-28. A group of midshipmen from the Navy of the Dominican Republic (ARD) recently boarded a ship for a cruise in the beautiful waters of the Caribbean – but this was no vacation. This was Maestro del Mar 2014, a series of drills held from November 17-28. The training ship departed from San Soucí Naval Station. There, Vice Admiral Edmundo Félix Pimentel, chief of naval operations, and a delegation of admirals and senior and junior officers, met participants after the exercises. “The peaceful waters of the Caribbean have been turned into a very active route for drug traffickers,” said Pou. The training ship departed from San Soucí Naval Station. There, Vice Admiral Edmundo Félix Pimentel, chief of naval operations, and a delegation of admirals and senior and junior officers, met participants after the exercises. The training exercises, held to familiarize participants with the daily tasks and activities of the Coast Guard service and interceptor ships, proceeded in two phases: the first at sea, the second on land. They included coastal and electronic navigation, ship formation maneuvers, drills in unit command and control, and the study of naval sciences. The midshipmen also conducted exercises in at-sea law enforcement, search and rescue operations, and maritime interdiction, including boarding suspect ships. “The Navy of the Dominican Republic no longer conducts training like Maestro del Mar 2014 as a primary operation but rather the training focuses on creating a more technological view of the military’s functions,” according to Daniel Pou, associate researcher at the Latin American School of Social Sciences (FLACSO) in the Dominican Republic. “This process of continual training is an essential element for them.” Working under the legal guidance of the Prosecutor’s Office, the ARD detected and intercepted an Eduardoño class boat as it entered Dominican waters. A Dominican Air Force helicopter transported a DNCD tactical team to Saono to participate in the investigation and arrests; its agents took custody of the drugs. The suspects will eventually be brought to trial by the Prosecutor’s Office for the Province of La Altagracia (Este). The training mission allowed the participating midshipmen to conduct drills using the latest in naval technology. The ARD has invested heavily in naval technology in recent years. By Dialogo December 15, 2014 The 5,000 sailors and marines in the ARD rely on training and technology to battle drug trafficking by transnational criminal organizations. Preparing to use the latest in naval equipment has helped the ARD register important victories against narco-traffickers. “The Navy runs a joint patrol with the National Drug Enforcement Directorate,” Pou said. “The Dominican Republic’s military aviation units maintain a constant patrol over the country’s coast. The coordinated actions and surveillance efforts are conducted jointly by the Dominican Navy and Air Force, and this cooperation leads to very significant seizures.” Because of its geographic location, the Dominican Republic is an important transshipment point for drug trafficking organizations. The island has many ports, which are used by vessels which transport goods to the United States and Europe. Drug traffickers often hide narcotics inside containers of fruit and other products that the country exports, such as clothing. “The Navy of the Dominican Republic no longer conducts training like Maestro del Mar 2014 as a primary operation but rather the training focuses on creating a more technological view of the military’s functions,” according to Daniel Pou, associate researcher at the Latin American School of Social Sciences (FLACSO) in the Dominican Republic. “This process of continual training is an essential element for them.” The 5,000 sailors and marines in the ARD rely on training and technology to battle drug trafficking by transnational criminal organizations. Preparing to use the latest in naval equipment has helped the ARD register important victories against narco-traffickers. “The Navy runs a joint patrol with the National Drug Enforcement Directorate,” Pou said. “The Dominican Republic’s military aviation units maintain a constant patrol over the country’s coast. The coordinated actions and surveillance efforts are conducted jointly by the Dominican Navy and Air Force, and this cooperation leads to very significant seizures.” Because of its geographic location, the Dominican Republic is an important transshipment point for drug trafficking organizations. The island has many ports, which are used by vessels which transport goods to the United States and Europe. Drug traffickers often hide narcotics inside containers of fruit and other products that the country exports, such as clothing. Emphasis on technology For example, November 24, the ARD in cooperation with the National Drug Enforcement Directorate (DNCD) arrested three Venezuelan citizens and seized their cargo of 775 packets of cocaine or heroin on the island of Saona, in the country’s southeast. “The peaceful waters of the Caribbean have been turned into a very active route for drug traffickers,” said Pou. The training mission allowed the participating midshipmen to conduct drills using the latest in naval technology. The ARD has invested heavily in naval technology in recent years. Emphasis on technology For example, November 24, the ARD in cooperation with the National Drug Enforcement Directorate (DNCD) arrested three Venezuelan citizens and seized their cargo of 775 packets of cocaine or heroin on the island of Saona, in the country’s southeast. The training exercises, held to familiarize participants with the daily tasks and activities of the Coast Guard service and interceptor ships, proceeded in two phases: the first at sea, the second on land. They included coastal and electronic navigation, ship formation maneuvers, drills in unit command and control, and the study of naval sciences. The midshipmen also conducted exercises in at-sea law enforcement, search and rescue operations, and maritime interdiction, including boarding suspect ships. ARD fights drug trafficking Working under the legal guidance of the Prosecutor’s Office, the ARD detected and intercepted an Eduardoño class boat as it entered Dominican waters. A Dominican Air Force helicopter transported a DNCD tactical team to Saono to participate in the investigation and arrests; its agents took custody of the drugs. The suspects will eventually be brought to trial by the Prosecutor’s Office for the Province of La Altagracia (Este). last_img read more

Colombia Marks Least Violent Months in More than 30 Years

first_img ELN atttacks increase “The conflict’s de-escalation has given the Armed Forces a greater capability to carry out offensive operations against other groups, and the results have been remarkable,” he said, referring to the October 2 operation that resulted in the death of kingpin Víctor Ramón Navarro Serrano, alias ‘Megateo’, a notorious drug trafficker for whom the U.S. government was offering a $5 million reward. “It has given the Army greater mobility with fewer threats.” “At least three of them – the Teófilo Forero, Daniel Aldana, and Miller Perdomo columns – are very involved in organized crime activities related to illegal mining and drug trafficking,” said Restrepo. “Along with some of the FARC’s fronts in Vichada and Catatumbo, they are the keenest on exploiting criminal incomes.” In particular, the ELN appears to be undergoing internal rifts and is so far unwilling to participate in a peace process. Nevertheless, CERAC reported that from late July to the end of September the FARC reportedly violated its unilateral ceasefire at least four times with intentional attacks and homicides, and during eight armed confrontations with the Colombian Army. Still, the agreement has resulted in a major decrease in bloodshed: those battles resulted in nine dead guerrillas and three Soldiers, an 83 percent decrease in offensive actions when compared to the monthly averages from January through May. “It’s evident that the FARC has decreased significantly its violent activities in the armed conflict,” Defense Minister Juan Carlos Villegas told RCN Radio late in September. “We have information of most fronts ceasing (their) activities.” The FARC’s ceasefire and Colombia’s drawdown began on July 20, when the government ceased airstrikes against the terrorist group. Since then, violent actions by the FARC have decreased dramatically – from 131 attacks in June and July to only four in August and September, according to CERAC Director Jorge Restrepo. Those six weeks from mid-August to the end of September were, in fact, the least violent in decades: authorities recorded the fewest conflict-related victims for a similar period of time since 1984, according to the CERAC. In fact, ELN attacks have increased 39 percent since July 20. Most of these incidents, including attacks on the Armed Forces, have taken place in the northeastern departments of Arauca and Norte de Santander. Conflict de-escalation measures agreed to by the Colombian government and the Revolutionary Armed Forces of Colombia (FARC) have yielded the two least violent months in more than 30 years, according to the Conflict Analysis Resource Center (CERAC), a Bogotá-based think tank that monitors the country’s levels of bloodshed. center_img FARC’s self-sufficient mobile columns These mobile columns have been responsible for most of the FARC’s major terrorist actions, and many of them have more firepower and explosives capabilities than a front. They pose a grave threat to maintaining the recent low levels of violence, according to the CERAC. “This was a negotiated agreement and it has been much more effective [than the FARC’s previous ceasefire], for it has led to a reduction of violence from both the FARC and the government,” Restrepo explained. Additionally, criminal groups and the National Liberation Army (ELN), another terrorist organization, could increase Colombia’s level of violence. By Dialogo October 22, 2015 Great information thanks I do not agree with what those criminal groups do. We in Colombia would have a much more pleasant country if it weren’t for that scourge. As a consequence of the FARC’s unilateral ceasefire and possible demobilization, the Colombian National Army can carry out more full-fledged operations against the ELN and criminal bands, according to Restrepo. Although this is good news for Colombia, the government must remain on alert. At least 60 percent of recent deaths have been caused by the FARC’s 28th mobile columns – units usually consisting of 70 to 80 fighters and designed to be maneuverable, independent, and self-sufficient. last_img read more

Peruvian Armed Forces Mindful about Education in Human Rights and International Humanitarian Law

first_imgBy Geraldine Cook/Diálogo November 16, 2016 If you add the function of providing the same training to military and civilian personnel from defense industries across Latin America to that role, the task becomes even more daunting. But these roles have been gratifying for Colonel Herbert Jesús Viviano Carpio, director of the Center for International Humanitarian Law and Human Rights of the Armed Forces of Peru (CDIH-DDHH, per its Spanish acronym). He has focused on the training center’s mission to become an educational authority on human rights and international humanitarian law (IHL), not only within his own country’s military, but internationally. Since becoming director of the center in January 2015, Col. Viviano, who was commissioned as a second lieutenant upon graduation from Chorrillos Military Academy in 1985 and later became a lawyer, has worked with national and international institutions, planning, organizing, and training in an effort to make the center known as a leader and promoter of human rights around the continent.Col. Viviano spoke with Diálogo about his experience running the center, its academic programs, the international experience of the students, and the challenges the institution faces in the future.Diálogo: Why discuss human rights in the military?Colonel Herbert Jesús Viviano Carpio: Increasingly, the military has been professionalizing its activities, and this professionalization demands respect and support from the populace. That is achieved precisely by respecting people’s human rights when the military performs its duties, which is why training on these subjects is so important. It could be said that the human rights training that we have geared towards military personnel is aimed at ensuring that they always act within established norms and pursuant to the treaties and agreements that we have made in these branches of law, especially since their compliance affects Peru’s image in the international community as a country that is respectful of human rights.Diálogo: Why is it important to have a human rights educational center for the armed forces?Col. Viviano: It is important because a state’s armed forces must base its actions on respecting international treaties and agreements, as well as the country’s constitution and domestic human rights regulations. That is why it is important for there to be a training center for instructing service members in these areas of international law, so that they will act in accordance with established norms, respecting human rights at all times and in all places where they carry out their duties, whether in cases of armed conflict domestically or internationally, or in other violent situations within their country.Diálogo: What is CDIH-DDHH’s main goal?Col. Viviano: CDIH-DDHH has been operating continuously for 13 years. This organization trains Peru’s military personnel and the military personnel of other countries that request guest participation in the courses. Similarly, training is provided to the personnel from Peru’s National Police and to civilian professionals from the judiciary branch, the Attorney General’s Office, and others who work in fields or agencies having to do with the subjects that are common to these branches of law. The main goal of these training courses is to have participants become able to discern the roles the armed forces fulfill in the context of their constitutional mission while respecting established norms, whether those are human rights norms set forth in their constitution, domestic and international norms to which the state has signed, and/or the norms dictated by IHL. All of this training is offered with the purpose of ensuring that members of the military and law enforcement fulfill their mission without overstepping their role or committing any of the crimes classified in these two branches of international law.Diálogo: Who benefits from this training?Col. Viviano: The beneficiaries are members of the Armed Forces of Peru, which includes the Army, Navy and Air Force. We also welcome members of the National Police to take part in this training, integrating them with the military to share knowledge and experiences in the use of force in violent situations. Civil service professionals also benefit from the training; mostly lawyers in the judiciary or at the Attorney General’s Office. They participate for the purpose of sharing their viewpoints on human rights jurisprudence and regulations, and also to get trained on IHL, because these two branches of international law are still not widely established in the curriculum at many universities throughout the country. It is important that civil service professionals learn the body of regulations under which military personnel operate in fulfilling our mission; both to defend our sovereignty and to maintain public order domestically. Similarly, military officers from other countries also benefit by sharing their experiences on these topics in different settings in which they operate, and by learning the same from us.Diálogo: What kind of training does CDIH-DDHH offer?Col. Viviano: We have a month-long basic course for military officers and guest civilian professionals. For personnel such as supervisors, non-commissioned specialists, and naval officers, the basic course is three months long. Following that, the personnel who have gone through these basic courses can access the three-week advanced course on human rights that is offered to officers. For supervisors, non-commissioned specialists, and naval officers, it is a two-week course. In both courses, the areas of doctrine and jurisprudence are covered, as well as practical application through case-based reasoning, with exercises and presentations. We hold monthly workshops at different garrisons throughout the country to train members of the armed forces away from the capital, where we also invite members of the Police, the judiciary, and civil authorities from the area.Diálogo: CDIH-DDHH offers training to other countries’ militaries. What has this international experience been like?Col. Viviano: It’s a very positive thing, because teaching the participants allows us to share knowledge and experience derived from operations or actions carried out by Latin American militaries in cases of human rights and IHL. In recent years, foreign military personnel have flocked to the center for training in both courses. We have had officers participate from our sister countries of Mexico, Bolivia, Colombia, Ecuador, Argentina, and Brazil. We also train members of the defense industries of the Union of South American Nations countries in a course that is divided between on-campus and online phases. The center has been operating for 13 years, and it is one of the oldest in the Americas to cover such subjects. That explains why our instructors are so experienced and why they continually train and participate in a variety of events at the national and international levels.Diálogo: What is the center’s relationship with U.S. Southern Command (SOUTHCOM)?Col. Viviano: We have a great relationship with SOUTHCOM. It is an important relationship, even more so since 2010, when it received more emphasis through the Human Rights Initiative. In recent years, we have worked continually on hosting seminars in Peru as well as in other countries on the continent. The human rights conferences that SOUTHCOM sponsors and hosts have been quite interesting. This April, a conference with members of South American countries was held here, in Lima, and it helped us move forward by expanding and advancing human rights promotion and protection within the armed forces. In the two years that I have served as CDIH-DDHH director, our relationship with SOUTHCOM has been very important, as it has afforded us the opportunity to learn how the members of other countries’ armed forces conduct themselves, pulling from their experiences and their failures in order to recover the best norms and experiences. We have been able to integrate with civil society, analyzing the real-world context for our doctrine and our training, as well as proposing new action mechanisms for promoting and defending human rights in the armed forces.Diálogo: In your experience as a CDIH-DDHH instructor, are these (military) students open to the subject of human rights?Col. Viviano: Yes. At present, this training is focused on teaching military service members to respect human rights wherever they are called upon to operate and in any situation. We represent the state all across the country, that’s why our key commitment is, and will continue to be, respect for the people’s human rights. It’s also the case that our military personnel, and especially our senior officers, are hugely motivated to be trained on such topics. And it is inspiring for the populace when they see a military officer teaching classes on human rights. That changes their view of the military service member as a competent professional who is conscientious about acting in ways that respect human rights.Diálogo: What is CDIH-DDHH’s main challenge moving forward?Col. Viviano: First, to keep growing as an academic institution nationally and internationally, and to reach a university level, offering master’s degrees and diplomas in these subjects, something that has already been laid out in various proposals. As for how it will specifically develop this mission in the future, CDIH-DDHH aims to become the main educational center in the Americas for spreading human rights and IHL to the military and for providing training in these areas.last_img read more

Military Training Looks to the Future in Peru

first_imgBy Geraldine Cook/Diálogo November 06, 2017 A unique academic environment pervades the halls of the Peruvian Air Force (FAP, per its Spanish acronym) Air War College. The school has high standards of quality and is educationally demanding for FAP officers. In its classrooms, students pay close attention and take notes on national defense and security, strategic planning, military operations, and civilian interaction, among other topics. They take on a great responsibility as they prepare to be the institution’s new leaders. “The academic level has been stupendous, really good professors,” said FAP Colonel Pablo Patrón, air defense specialist and student in the High Command Program (PAM, per its Spanish acronym). “The academic level is higher. It helps us understand how the state apparatus evolves, which propels us into public administration.” The yearlong PAM targets colonels who have the best chance at promotion, so they can fine-tune their knowledge on strategic design, planning, training, and execution within the military realm, while allowing them to analyze the domestic situation to resolve conflicts. “Our objective is to train all the FAP officers of different ranks, so that they are qualified for any position and can lead our institution when they finish their studies,” said FAP Major General César Augusto Fernández Corbetto, commandant of the school. “We want officers to be trained and leave here as prepared as possible. [We want] those who graduate to be as well trained as possible and for them to make the best decisions in their assignments.” The school The Air War College was founded in 1946, and officially inaugurated in 1947, three years before the official inception of FAP. It has operated on different military premises in Lima, Peru, but has maintained its own facilities in the district of La Molina since 1991. As Peruvian military aviation was still being developed, U.S. Air Force Colonel Robert C. Orth acted as the original commandant of the school from 1947 to 1948. The first class of officers graduated in 1950. The academic institution has an average of 250 students, including officers from the country’s other military branches. The students are selected by their respective units and assigned to academic work full-time for one year. The teaching staff comprises active and retired military members and civilians. “This school is highly sought after,” Maj. Gen. Fernández said. He explained that of an average of 80 prospective candidates each year, only 28 officers are admitted. The academic programs are divided into different areas, and the Peruvian Ministry of Education is in the process of accrediting it as an official school of higher education. The area of Military Doctrine, for example, includes PMA, the Command and General Staff Program (PCEM, per its Spanish acronym), the Service Officers General Staff Program, and the Tactics Program. In addition to being certified in their respective areas of specialization, PMA and PCEM students graduate with a master’s degree in Aerospace Doctrine and Administration from the National University of San Marcos, Peru. Other certification courses are offered as well, such as Accident Prevention and Investigation, Aviation Medicine, and Psychology, among others. The school also has academic internships with other institutions, both domestically and internationally. Officers from Argentina, Brazil, South Korea, and other countries have attended its classes. “Interacting with other forces is very important,” said Col. Patrón, who has completed nine months of studies and is attending classes with his counterparts from FAP and other Peruvian forces. “Although we are from the same country, under the same flag, and speak the same language, we do have some differences, but sharing experiences with them is very enriching,” he said. Quality education “It’s a great responsibility to be a professor at the Air War College. The officers come here with a high degree of knowledge and a vast amount of experience leading large units in the organization,” said Edward Pino Hurtado, faculty advisor and PAM coordinator. “We attach great importance to the evaluation of students in decision making and the critical analysis that they carry out during the planning process. This is complex and difficult, but it is fascinating and important.” Pino said that the academic programs are vital to the officers as they allow them to advance in their military careers. “Students who come here have many incentives; they’re thinking about their future and their profession.” FAP Major Nadia Maycook, a PCEM student, is motivated by such a future. Three months after graduating, Maj. Maycook has honed her knowledge on planning and operational application of aerospace power in war processes. “We put into practice all the tools and the resources we have to implement during war,” she said. “Operationally, I am learning things you don’t see every day in an administrative unit.” Maj. Maycook is part of a class of 32 students, including four women. “We are past the difficult phase of working as women and men,” she said. “At first, the change was more difficult for [the men], and the experience was the more difficult part for us, but not anymore, we don’t have any difficulty working as a team.” For FAP First Lieutenant Cristian Medina, a helicopter pilot and Tactics Program student, the course has given him enriching experiences, especially in the study of military doctrine. “This is the first time we are seeing doctrine in an assertive manner, with people who are specialized in resolving issues based on their knowledge and, more than anything else, based on their experience.” Sitting in his classroom with 37 of his fellow students, ready for the start of the day’s academic session, 1st Lt. Medina said that, in addition to the academic part, the relationship between the 38 students in the class has been essential. “You are with a lot of people, and each person is like a different world. So, you also learn what living together and working as a team means,” he said. “I am a helicopter pilot based in operations, and I am learning how others perform in their areas.”last_img read more

Navies of the World Meet to Practice Maritime Security Doctrine

first_imgBy Andréa Barretto / Diálogo August 14, 2019 Piracy, terrorism, illegal immigration, and environmental disasters are some of the issues that threaten maritime traffic. These threats may affect countries’ crucial activities, such as the import and export of cargo by sea. The objective of multinational exercise Bell Buoy is to work jointly to better understand what happens in the maritime environment and to combat these threats.The Pacific and Indian Ocean Shipping Working Group (PACIOSWG) conducts this annual training. The 2019 edition took place in Australian waters, May 6-17, bringing together about 80 service members from the navies of Australia, Brazil, Ecuador, Fiji, France, Mexico, New Zealand, South Korea, the United Kingdom, and the United States.Bell Buoy simulates scenarios that incorporate new threats to which participants must respond. The doctrine of Naval Cooperation and Guidance for Shipping (NCAGS) regulates all activities. The maritime traffic naval control doctrine, developed by the North Atlantic Treaty Organization, is used as a reference to update doctrines PACIOSWG member countries adopt. Sydney based participants from the Royal Australian Navy, Royal New Zealand Navy, United States Navy and the Royal Navy, during Exercise Bell Buoy 2019.“The exercise was designed specifically to promote the practice of NCAGS’ processes and policies at tactical and operational levels,” said Brazilian Navy (MB, in Portuguese) Commander Fábio Pereira Moraes, who heads the Maritime Security Section of the Integrated Maritime Security Center. The institution is part of the MB structure and collects navigation security and maritime protection data.Cooperation Brazil participated in Bell Buoy as an observer since 2005, and actively participates in the exercise since 2012. In the 2019 edition, two officers represented MB. Cmdr. Fábio Moraes participated as part of the General Staff, while Brazilian Navy Lieutenant Commander Leonardo Lopes Pereira da Silva, integrated a team that was sent to ports.“Bell Buoy is predominantly a ‘command post’ exercise, or a type of exercise in which the forces are simulated, involving the commander, the General Staff, and the communications inside and between the commands, however using real resources,” said Cmdr. Fábio Moraes.According to the scenario, participants faced a series of threats, such as piracy attacks of increasing intensity which affected the lines of communication, and industry and maritime trade in a fictitious region between the southeast coast of Australia andNew Zealand. The goal was to respond, making decisions based on NCAGS doctrine incorporated within a software that simulated the theater of operations.According to Cmdr. Fábio Moraes, an array of important information contributes to maritime security in routine activities of each country’s maritime traffic control. “It depends on the type of operation and the expected threat. We can list some characteristics, among others, of the vessels and lines of communications in the region,” said the officer.The live portion of the training consisted of a group of service members visiting Australian ports to guide the local maritime community.According to Cmdr. Fábio Moraes, the NCAGS doctrine is designed to avoid the conflict of military operations with maritime traffic, and also seeks to increase local security. The doctrine provides the interface between the commander of military operations and the maritime community, especially commercial vessels and those entities that operate them. “All sources and available resources may and must be used to promote guidance and cooperation with commercial vessels, for instance, with teams sent to the theater of operations,” said the officer.last_img read more

First House bill filed would rewrite Article V

first_img First House bill filed would rewrite Article V Senior Editor T his could be a bad omen that Florida’s courts may face another challenging time in the 2002 session of the Florida Legislature.The first House bill filed for next year’s session is a proposed constitutional amendment that would dramatically limit the authority of Florida’s courts and give the legislature more authority over court procedures. If passed by the legislature, it would go to voters for review next year.The bill, HJR 1, filed by Rep. Bruce Kyle, R-Ft. Myers, is similar but less drastic than a bill introduced in the 2001 session by Rep. Fred Brummer, R-Apopka. That bill was heard in the House Judiciary Committee, but never came to a vote after committee members and people testifying on its impacts raised several questions.Unlike Brummer’s measure, Kyle’s bill does not seek to do away with The Florida Bar and give the legislature at least some oversight of the legal profession. Nor does it require that district court of appeal judges and Supreme Court justices must get a two-thirds “yes” vote in their merit retention referendums in order to stay in office. Also dropped was a provision requiring Senate confirmation of the governor’s judicial appointments, and several other provisions.But the bill does seek to restrict jurisdiction of Florida courts, limit the use of habeas corpus and other writs, and to give the legislature greater say in court procedural matters.Kyle, a Bar member and assistant state attorney in the 20th Circuit, said he filed the bill because he’s concerned courts have stepped beyond deciding legal disputes into the policy-making arena, which is the duty of the legislature.“It’s an important issue that needs to be aired, and the public has a right to make a decision on this,” he said. “I think we’ve got a good system in the federal system, and if we mirror that, we won’t have such an outreaching by the courts to set public policy when there isn’t even a case or controversy in front of them.”As for a bill provision allowing the legislature to give a DCA statewide jurisdiction over a specific issue, “It’s a good option to have, especially with the workload of our courts today,” Kyle said. “I don’t think it’s a bad option to have available, to establish courts that do specific functions, if need be. That doesn’t mean it has to be done.”Kyle added he dropped provisions from Brummer’s proposed bill that had to do with judicial appointments, merit retention, and Bar oversight because they detracted from what he saw as the main thrust of the legislation in delineating a clear line between the duties of the legislature and the courts.He also said he thinks it has a fair chance of success. “Any of the more controversial issues or issues that are new take more than one session before they become law,” Kyle said. “It has as good a shot as any other legislative proposal.”Bar Legislation Committee Chair Hank Coxe said the committee and the Board of Governors will carefully review the bill at the board’s August 22-23 meeting in Naples.“Any proposed legislation that threatens to weaken any branch of government or jeopardize our system of checks and balances must be taken seriously,” Coxe said. “We will take this seriously as part of the Bar’s fundamental obligation to ensure that our judiciary remains uncontrolled by another branch of government, just as we would expect the legislative and executive branches to say the same.”Last year’s legislative staff analysis of Brummer’s bill noted that the federal Constitution is more restrictive on the jurisdiction of federal courts than the state constitution is on state courts. The analysis also noted that Congress has more control over procedural rules.In contrast, the analysis said that Florida courts have held unconstitutional state laws that conflict with court procedural rules. It also noted that some opinions have held it can be difficult to draw the line between procedural and substantive rules.The proposed constitutional amendment specifically sets out a restricted jurisdiction of the state courts. It provides that “the jurisdiction of such courts shall extend only to actual cases in law, equity, admiralty and maritime jurisdiction, and to actual controversies arising under the constitution and the laws of the State of Florida and of the United States.”And repeating one of the most controversial segments of Bummer’s bill last year, it would authorize the legislature to give any of the five district courts of appeal final statewide jurisdiction over any issue. For example, the legislature could pick one DCA to be the final court for all death penalty appeals.The bill would also limit the ability of the courts to issue writs in general and to specifically review actions of other public officials through quo warranto writs. Quo warranto writs, according to the bill, may be used only to determine whether a public official is rightly holding an office and not to “review any right, power, or duty of a public official. . . . All writs except those directed to judicial officers shall be subject to statutes of limitations as provided by general law.”The staff analysis of the Brummer bill noted that quo warranto had traditionally been used only to challenge the right of officials to hold office, but had been expanded to challenge actions by those officials.Another section of the bill allows a statute of limitation on habeas corpus writs, but provides such a limit may not be less than two years from final judgment or mandate on direct appeal. The bill provides that the courts’ procedural rules must conform to state law when the rules are adopted, and must be changed to conform to any subsequently adopted statutes. It also provides that the legislature may override any court rule by a majority vote, instead of the two-thirds vote now required.In addition, the bill also specifies that new rules may neither “abridge, enlarge, nor modify the substantive rights of any litigant, but additional rulemaking power may be expressly delegated to courts by general law.”The original jurisdiction of the Supreme Court is limited under the bill to judicial and lawyer disciplinary issues, plus questions posed by the attorney general or governor.Some provisions introduced last year in the Brummer bill but not repeated this year in HJR 1 include removing the Bar’s appointments to the Judicial Qualifications Commission and giving them to the legislature, prohibiting the courts from setting or modifying legislative appropriations, making the Supreme Court’s annual judicial certification advisory rather than a constitutional certification of need, and allowing judicial candidates to voice opinions and speak on issues, unless limited by the legislature. August 15, 2001 Gary Blankenship Senior Editor Regular News First House bill filed would rewrite Article Vlast_img read more

Family Law Section to retool its operations

first_imgWith major projects in the offing, including perhaps creating alimony guidelines and proposing a presumption in divorces that the children should spend equal time with each parent, the Family Law Section is looking at revamping how it operates.Incoming section Chair Richard West noted a procedural expert was attending the Executive Council’s June 26 meeting at the Bar Annual Meeting, and the section was planning other activities to improve operations.“One of our goals was to do leadership training on how to run more productive meetings,” West said at the start of the council meeting. He said a leadership training seminar will be held for all section committee chairs during the Bar’s September General Meeting.Outgoing Chair Caroline Black said the section Long Range Planning Committee has also been working on that for the past year. Its work has included a retreat for section leadership, proposing that the executive council be expanded, and making every council member a chair or vice chair of a section committee to improve involvement and operations.Procedures have also been set in place to ensure committees run smoothly from year to year.Those improved operations will be used by the section this year as it tackles major issues.Black told the council she has appointed a Bounds of Advocacy Committee. It will take ethical standards adopted by the American Academy of Matrimonial Lawyers and see if they should be adopted by the council to guide Florida lawyers in handling family law matters.“They are ethical standards for lawyers to follow,” Black said. “They are very wonderful guidelines and I asked that committee to look at those guidelines and decide whether Florida should have something like it.”A report could be ready for the council by next June.Black also pointed to a recent AAML seminar on alimony guidelines and said that raised questions of whether the section should advocate those for Florida cases.Council member Alan Rubinstein said the approach is not to create a “grid” but to provide better guidance on vague and gray areas.Council member Mark Sessums noted that can be several variables. For example, requirements would be different in the breakup of a 12-year marriage if the couple is 62 rather than 30. Guidelines, he added, could help settle many cases.“We have a duty to the citizens of Florida to make our laws more predictable,” Sessums said. “It’s our responsibility to do that.”The section’s Legislation Committee has set up a subcommittee to tackle that issue.Before the meeting, West said he hopes to look at how visitation is decided in divorce cases.“We’re going to begin looking at creating the premise that parents in a divorce action should spend time equally with their children,” he said.That has the potential of lowering conflicts and costs in a divorce case and it also “recognizes parents are equal partners” in raising their children, West said. He added the law already recognizes the economic equality of marriage partners, and it should expand that to parental privileges.On another matter, the council voted 14-12 to hold future council meetings in conjunction with section CLE offerings. August 1, 2003 Regular News Family Law Section to retool its operationscenter_img Family Law Section to retool its operationslast_img read more

October 15, 2003 News and Notes

first_imgOctober 15, 2003 News and Notes Jeffrey S. Kurtz, an associate of Brinkley, McNerney, Morgan, Solomon & Tatum, LLP, Ft. Lauderdale, has been designated village counsel for the Village of Wellington. Thomas A. Culmo, of Culmo & Culmo, P.A., Miami, lectured at a seminar titled Handling of a Personal Injury Case in Federal Court, sponsored by the National Business Institute. He also presented a lecture on opening statements at the A.J. Cohn Trial Advocacy Institute, in Orlando, which was sponsored by the Academy of Florida Trial Lawyers. Hubert C. Childress, of Childress & Charpentier, P.A., Melbourne, has been appointed to the board of directors for the Brevard County Legal Aid Associaton. Paul Steven Singerman and Paul A. Avron, of Berger Singerman, co-wrote an article titled “Of Precedents and Bankruptcy Court Independence,” which was featured on the cover of the August/September issue of the American Bankruptcy Institute Journal. Pedro A. Freyre, of counsel to Akerman Senterfitt, has been elected chair of the Miami-Dade County Community Relations Board. Katherine C. “Kacy” Lake, shareholder of Fowler White Boggs Banker, has been selected to participate in the 2004 class of Leadership Tampa. David W. Henry, of Allen, Dyer, Doppelt, Milbrath & Gilchrist, P.A., has been appointed program chair for DRI’s Intellectual Property Litigation and Insurance Conference in San Diego. Mary F. Smallwood, partner of Ruden, McClosky, Smith, Schuster & Russell, P.A., received the Bill Sadowski Memorial Public Service Award in recognition of her record of public service in environmental and land use law. Brian P. Kirwin and Tomasita D. Crowell, of Kirwin Norris, P.A., spoke at a Lorman Education Services seminar titled Public Contract Code and Competitive Public Bidding in Florida. Joe Adams, of Becker & Poliakoff, P.A., was appointed to the Task Force on Homeowners’ Associations by Diane Carr, secretary of the Department of Business and Professional Regulation. Robert D. Pritt, city attorney for Naples, has been named Florida’s Outstanding Municipal Attorney of the Year by the Florida Municipal Attorneys Association. Mark A. Levy, an associate of Brinkley, McNerney, Morgan, Solomon & Tatum, LLP, was selected to participate in the Greater Ft. Lauderdale Chamber of Commerce Leadership Ft. Lauderdale, Class X. Brian L. Tannebaum, of Tannebaum, Planas & Weiss, has been appointed legislative director of the Florida Association of Criminal Defense Lawyers. Martin R. Raskin, of Raskin & Raskin, P.A., in Miami and Naples, spoke on Criminalization of Employment Related Matters: A Changing Landscape, at the fall conference of the National Employment Lawyers Association held in St. Petersburg. Peter W. Zinober, of Zinober & McCrea, P.A., Tampa, was elected to a four-year term as a management member of the Council of the Labor and Employment Law Section of the American Bar Assocation. Trenton H. Cotney, an associate of Glenn Rasmussen Fogarty & Hooker, P.A., was appointed to the University of Tampa Board of Counselors. Lawrence H. Kolin, of Alvarez, Sambol, Winthrop & Madson, P.A., will serve on the advisory committee for the nonprofit Jewish Pavilion, a program of the Jewish Senior Housing Council of Greater Orlando. Timothy S. Franklin presented Top Five Things to Know About Community Development Districts at a recent People’s Law Day Symposium in St. Johns County, sponsored and chaired by Judge Patti Christensen. Louise B. Zeuli, of Louise B. Zeuli, P.A., presented Mental Capacity Issues in Estate Planning, Guardianship, and Probate Law, to the estate, guardianship, and trust committee of the Orange County Bar Association in Orlando. Michael S. Budwick, of Meland, Russin, Hellinger & Budwick, P.A., has been appointed to the board of directors of Chabad of South Dade, Inc., also known as Chabad of the Grove, a nonprofit organization that provides programs, services, and institutions to serve Jewish families throughout South Dade. Lynn E. Wagner, president of Litigation Alternatives, Inc., Winter Park, has been appointed to the arbitration panel of the United Mine Workers of America/Bituminous Coal Operators Association, District 17. Rhea F. Law, president of Fowler White Boggs Banker, has accepted the Florida Council of 100’s invitation of resident membership, with approval from Gov. Jeb Bush. David S. Hendrix, a shareholder of GrayHarris, Tampa, has joined the board of directors of Crime Stoppers of Pinellas County, Inc. John H. “Jack” Hickey, was named as a fellow and life member of The Florida Bar Foundation. Amy S. Rubin, partner of Ruden, McClosky, Smith, Schuster & Russell, P.A., West Palm Beach, spoke at the litigation management super course, Hot Topics and Ethics Issues for Corporate Counsel, sponsored by The Network of Trial Law Firms. She spoke on Terrorism’s Impact on In-house Counsel and Litigation. Colleen M. Fitzgerald, of GrayHarris, Tampa, has been selected as vice president of membership for the Hillsborough Association of Women Lawyers for the 2003-04 year. Mark Eiglarsh, partner of Robbins, Tunkey, Ross, Amsel, Raben, Waxman & Eiglarsh, P.A., Miami, made his second appearance on Fox News’ “The O’Reilly Factor,” where he spoke concerning the Title VI complaint filed by the NAACP, alleging Florida’s educational system is unconstitutional. Neisen O. Kasdin, of Gunster Yoakley, has won the 2003 Building Our Community Award for community excellence in real estate law. Garrett J. Biondo, of Goldfarb, Gold, Gonzalez & Wald, P.A., Miami, co-chaired the Academy of Florida Trial Lawyers’ 2003 Al J. Cone Trial Advocacy Institute in Orlando. Bruce J. Winick was honored by the Heart Sight Miami Committee for the Foundation Fighting Blindness at their annual dinner. Patrick J. Lannon, an associate of White & Case, LLP, Miami, spoke at a Lormar seminar about IRA planning strategies for the transferring and preserving of wealth. Matt Bartolomei, of Hill, Adams, Hall & Schieffelin, Winter Park, gave a speech titled Emergency Medicine from the Defense Perspective at the annual meeting of the Florida College of Emergency Physicians in Ponte Vedra. Michael A. Lampert, of West Palm Beach, addressed a seminar sponsored by the National Business Institute, for which he spoke on Florida Sales and Use Tax Update. Michael Goldstein, of Akerman Senterfitt, Miami, moderated a seminar on environmental liability and delivered a keynote speech titled Sustaining Sustainability: Reflections on Brownfields Reuse and Redevelopment in Florida, at the Sixth Annual Florida Brownfields Conference held in St. Petersburg. Gregory Taylor, of Gelch Taylor Hodkin Kopelowitz & Ostrow, P.A., spoke at the Real Estate Expo in Hollywood, where he lectured on mortgage law at the two-day seminar. Burnadette Norris-Weeks, of Ft. Lauderdale, was awarded the Above and Beyond Award at a recent American Bar Association conference for her work as chair of the ABA’s Section of Litigation’s Minority Trial Lawyer Committee. Neil Linden, a shareholder with Adorno & Yoss, has been appointed chair of the Coral Gables Chamber of Commerce. Allison E. Butler, of Grazi and Gianino, Stuart, has published an article in the German journal, IHR, titled “Caveat Emptor: Remedy-Oriented Approach Restricts Buyer’s Right to Avoidance Under Article 49 (1) (a) of the United Nations Convention on Contracts for the International Sale of Goods.” Stacey Koch, of Shook, Hardy & Bacon, Miami, was elected to the board of directors of the Miami-Dade County Bar Association Young Lawyers Section. Elliot Wilcox, of the Office of the State Attorney, Ninth Judicial Circuit, presented a one-hour CLE program titled Beyond “What Happened Next?”–Improving Your Direct Examination, for the Florida Prosecuting Attorneys Association’s DUI Trial Advocacy Schools in Cocoa Beach and Orlando. He also presented Protecting Seniors from Fraud, to Community Care for the Elderly. Eddie Francis, of Lowndes, Drosdick, Doster, Kantor & Reed, P.A., has been named chair of the City of Orlando Municipal Planning Board for the 2003-04 term. Steven M. Ziegler, of Hollywood, presented a seminar titled Liability Exposure and Reduction of Risk, to the senior staff and medical directors of Blue Cross Blue Shield of Florida. William T. Hennessey, of Gunster Yoakley, West Palm Beach, was a featured speaker at two Florida Bar seminars on basic probate and guardianship, where he made his presentation, titled Uncivil War: Navigating the Battlefield of Probate and Trust Litigation. Trevor Brewer, associate of Foley & Lardner, Orlando, was honored as chapter president of the year by the University of Central Florida Alumni Association. Douglas M. Halsey and Neal McAliley, of White & Case, LLP, Miami, took part in the annual 2003 Environmental and Land Use Law Annual Update, held on Amelia Island. Halsey delivered a talk on regulatory takings, a Harris Act update, and other property issues; McAliley discussed recent developments in the Clean Air Act, Resource Conservation and Recovery Act, and the federal Superfund statute. Stephen K. Tilbrook, partner of Shutts & Bowen, LLP, Ft. Lauderdale, has been elected to a second term as president of the board of directors of the Riverwalk Ft. Lauderdale Trust. Bob Murphy, vice president and CEO of Baptist Hospital in Pensacola, was elected chair-elect of Pensacola Clean and Green, an affiliate of Keep Florida Beautiful and Keep America Beautiful. Walter Gonzalez, Jr., associate of Holtzman Equels, has been elected to the board of directors of the CHARLEE Program, Homes for Children of Miami-Dade County. Bryan Greenberg, a partner of Ruden, McClosky, Smith, Schuster & Russell, P.A., Ft. Lauderdale, was named to the board of directors of the Broward County Humane Society. October 15, 2003 Regular Newslast_img read more