Month:

August 2019

Tokyo smellingscreen demo lets scents go virtual

first_img Explore further The TUAT demo was titled, “Smelling Screen: Presenting a Virtual Odor Source on a LCD Screen,” by Haruka Matsukura, Tatsuhiro Yoneda, and Hiroshi Ishida.”The smelling screen is a new olfactory display that can generate a localized odor distribution on a two-dimensional display screen,” they stated. While the user perceives the odor as coming from a specific region of the screen, the position of the virtual odor source can be shifted to an arbitrary position on the screen. In fact, they said, the viewer can freely move his or her head to sniff at various locations on the screen, and can experience “realistic changes in the odor intensity with respect to the sniffing location.”New Scientist’s explanation of how the technology works said that odors from vaporizing gel pellets were fed into four air streams, one in each corner of the screen. The streams are blown out by fans, and they can be varied in strength and direction.Matsukura said a next step in their research will be incorporating a cartridge where smells can be changed easily.In another undertaking, Hiroshi Ishida, Associate Professor, Division of Advanced Mechanical Systems Engineering, had discussed “Olfactory display that presents a virtual odor source by manipulating airflow,” in which he relayed practical applications of smelling-screen research.Although attempts have been made to promote sales in supermarkets by releasing appetizing smells, he wrote, in most cases the airflows and odors are simply blown from motorized fans. He said the attempt to lure customers toward foods through scent delivery could be more effective through another approach:”If we can provide users or customers with a sensation that the odor and airflow are coming from the image on the monitor or screen, we can draw their attention with some surprise.” Beyond food sales, he said he thought that this device could also be used in museums and art galleries to create unique exhibitions and artwork. A woman’s nose knows body odor (Phys.org) —”Scent-delivery” technologies continue to interest marketers, who are always looking for ideas on how to deliver an enhanced shopper experience. Scent stimulation related to targeted products is one way to go. Now, a “smelling screen” has been developed by researchers at Tokyo University of Agriculture and Technology (TUAT) and it makes smells appear to come from the exact spot on any LCD screen that is displaying the image of a food item. A peach or a steaming cup of coffee, for example, would lend the illusion that their respective smells were coming from the images on the screen direct to the viewer. The smelling screen was shown at the IEEE Virtual Reality conference in Orlando, Florida, which ran from March 16 to March 23. Citation: Tokyo smelling-screen demo lets scents go virtual (2013, March 31) retrieved 18 August 2019 from https://phys.org/news/2013-03-tokyo-smelling-screen-demo-scents-virtual.html This document is subject to copyright. Apart from any fair dealing for the purpose of private study or research, no part may be reproduced without the written permission. The content is provided for information purposes only. Smelling Screen: Presenting a Virtual Odor Source on a LCD Screen © 2013 Phys.org More information: ieeevr.org/2013/program/activities/researchdemoswww.computer.org/csdl/trans/tg … g2013040606-abs.htmlwww.tuat.ac.jp/~h-ishida/proje … lfactorydisplay.htmlvia Newscientistlast_img read more

New discovery could be a ThorneZytkow object

first_img A Thorne-Zytkow object, Kip Throne and Anna Zytkow theorized back in 1975, could come to exist when a dying red giant star swallows an orbiting neutron star. The result would be, the researchers suggested, a star with another smaller star embedded in its core and which would overall resemble other known types of stars but would emit a different and unique chemical signature. Since that time, many space scientists have scoured the heavens looking for such an object—many candidates have been found, but thus far none have been confirmed. In this latest effort, the found object appears to closely resemble what Thorne and Zytkow predicted.The object is was found in the Small Magellanic Cloud—Levesque reported that thus far, the research team has confirmed that it emits molybdenum, lithium and rubidium—all elements predicted by theory to exist in abundant amounts in the theoretical object. The original researchers suggested such elements would have to forge unusual pathways to burn their way through the dying stars outer parts due to an interruption of the fusion process in the red giant. The object was found, Levesque also reported, as part of a survey the team was conducting on 22 objects in the cloud using one of the Magellan telescopes (and its 21 foot diameter mirror) located in Chile’s Atacama Desert.Space scientists have speculated that if theory holds, there should be several Thorne-Zytkow objects in the Milky Way, though no one has found evidence yet. Commenting on the find, co-theorist Thorne suggested that the new discovery is the most promising yet found.More work will have to be done before it will become known if the newly discovered specimen is truly a Thorne-Zytkow object. Specifically, scientists will focus on the elements found in the object as thus far there appears to be a little less of it than theory suggests. A neutron star. Image: NASA © 2014 Phys.org More information: via Nature This document is subject to copyright. Apart from any fair dealing for the purpose of private study or research, no part may be reproduced without the written permission. The content is provided for information purposes only. (Phys.org) —Speaking at this year’s American Astronomical Society meeting, Hubble Fellow, Emily Levesque reported that she and her colleagues at the University of Colorado have discovered a star that just might qualify as a Thorne-Zytkow object. The object has not been named as yet, however, as the team has not yet published its results. Citation: New discovery could be a Thorne-Zytkow object (2014, January 8) retrieved 18 August 2019 from https://phys.org/news/2014-01-discovery-thorne-zytkow.html Explore further Hubble sees a stellar “sneezing fit”last_img read more

CLIP170 microtuble found to bind tightly to formins to accelerate actin filament

first_img(Phys.org)—A team of researchers at Brandeis University in Massachusetts, has found that the CLIP-170 microtuble found in cells, which had been known to be important in cytoskeleton development, binds tightly to formins to accelerate actin filament elongation. In their paper published in the journal Science, the team describes their experiments with adding a fluorescent protein to the microtubule to better understand the roll CLIP-170 plays in actin flament assembly. In a Perspective piece on the work done by the team, Klemens Rottner with Universität Braunschweig in Germany also explains the role played by microtubules and actin filaments in the development of the eukaryotic cytoskeleton (the material that holds the shape of cells.) Explore further More information: J. L. Henty-Ridilla et al. Accelerated actin filament polymerization from microtubule plus ends, Science (2016). DOI: 10.1126/science.aaf1709AbstractMicrotubules (MTs) govern actin network remodeling in a wide range of biological processes, yet the mechanisms underlying this cytoskeletal cross-talk have remained obscure. We used single-molecule fluorescence microscopy to show that the MT plus-end–associated protein CLIP-170 binds tightly to formins to accelerate actin filament elongation. Furthermore, we observed mDia1 dimers and CLIP-170 dimers cotracking growing filament ends for several minutes. CLIP-170–mDia1 complexes promoted actin polymerization ~18 times faster than free–barbed-end growth while simultaneously enhancing protection from capping proteins. We used a MT-actin dynamics co-reconstitution system to observe CLIP-170–mDia1 complexes being recruited to growing MT ends by EB1. The complexes triggered rapid growth of actin filaments that remained attached to the MT surface. These activities of CLIP-170 were required in primary neurons for normal dendritic morphology. Thus, our results reveal a cellular mechanism whereby growing MT plus ends direct rapid actin assembly. This document is subject to copyright. Apart from any fair dealing for the purpose of private study or research, no part may be reproduced without the written permission. The content is provided for information purposes only. Scientists reveal mechanism for cellular remodeling Citation: CLIP-170 microtuble found to bind tightly to formins to accelerate actin filament elongation (2016, May 20) retrieved 18 August 2019 from https://phys.org/news/2016-05-clip-microtuble-tightly-formins-actin.htmlcenter_img Journal information: Science © 2016 Phys.org Components of the eukaryotic cytoskeleton. Actin filaments are shown in red, microtubules are in green, and the nuclei are in blue. Credit: NIH/Public Domain In order for a cell to hold its shape, filaments must grow to the size needed to provide support, similar in some respects to the cartilage found in the nose and other parts of the body. But, in order for the cell to grow to the proper size and shape it needs to be to hold all its components, some type of mechanism must be in place to regulate the growth. Prior research has shown that microtubules serve that purpose, but how the process works, has remained somewhat murky. In this new effort, the researchers found that the CLIP-170 microtuble actually binds very tightly to a protein known as formin, and in so doing is able to play a role in determining how long an actin filment will grow—or more specifically, to actually accelerate elongation.To learn more about the role that CLIP-170 plays in cytoskeleton development, the researchers applied a fluorescent protein to some of them in their lab, and then watched what happened using single cell microscopy during cell maturation. In addition to accelerating actin filament elongation, the team observed it along with mDia1 dimers, tracking filament ends and promoting polymerization (causing it to grow approximately 18 times faster than growth without it), which provided a protective cap. They also found that using another technique allowed them to watch as the mDia1/CLIP-10 complexes were coaxed into action by microtubule ends, which resulted in rapid filament growth. They note that such filament growth is most particularly necessary for dendrite growth in neurons.last_img read more

Russian geneticist repeats dog domestication with foxes in just fifty years

first_img Explore further Red Fox. Credit: Jonn Leffmann/Wikipedia/CC BY 3.0 Foxes cannot be tamed, the conventional thinking goes—you can raise them in your house, feed them like babies and try to cuddle with them, but their wild nature will eventually win out—they will become unruly and eventually unwelcome pets. But what if the wildness was bred out of them? That is what Belyaev wondered, so he set to work on a very long term project—one that was very simple. He and his intern, Lyudmila Trut, wandered around Russia searching for foxes to start their experiment. Foxes were chosen based on their behavior in the presence of humans. Those that showed slightly more tolerance of humans were brought back to their Novosibirsk lab to serve as the start group. From there, the foxes were mated, and once again, those cubs that showed the most tolerance for humans were kept as part of the experiment while the others went on to become fur coats. This process was repeated for a half-century—the research pair found that within just a few generations, the foxes had begun to lose their wildness and mistrust of humans. The fourth generation, they reported, showed traits that we see in modern dogs, such as tail wagging, seeking human contact and licking people. Over the course of 50 years, the foxes became friendly, their behavior nearly indistinguishable from domestic dogs. They changed physically, too; their ears drooped and their legs and snouts became shorter and their heads got wider. And it was not all on the outside—their adrenal glands became more active, resulting in higher levels of serotonin in their brains, which is known to mute aggressive behavior.Today, the foxes are still being bred, but they are also being sold as pets to help pay for the cost of the research center. Belyaev died back in 1985, but the program is still overseen by Trut, and by most standards, the long-term experiment has been a resounding success—most researchers who visit the lab have found that theories regarding how dog domestication came about were consistent with what has been observed in the novel experiment in Russia. Comfort dogs bring healing in times of tragedy Citation: Russian geneticist repeats dog domestication with foxes in just fifty years (2016, September 16) retrieved 18 August 2019 from https://phys.org/news/2016-09-russian-geneticist-dog-domestication-foxes.htmlcenter_img (Phys.org)—A Russian geneticist, the BBC is reporting, replicated the process that led to the domestication of the dog, with foxes, over the course of just fifty years. Curious about the means by which dogs became domesticated, Dmitry Belyaev began a breeding program in the late 1950’s aimed at replicating the process using foxes. © 2016 Phys.org This document is subject to copyright. Apart from any fair dealing for the purpose of private study or research, no part may be reproduced without the written permission. The content is provided for information purposes only.last_img read more

Just to spread love

first_imgDiwali comes in happy boxes and baskets at Hyatt Regency Delhi’s Sidewalk. This year Sidewalk has taken a selection of traditional Indian sweets, homemade chocolates, nuts and more to create a celebratory gift hamper!  Go ahead and make this festival of lights truly a festival of delights! Sidewalk has made the decision to choose a hamper for your loved ones easy. The flavour of this Diwali season is a blend of traditional and contemporary; the brightly coloured and beautifully packaged hampers will leave a lasting impression. They come in three different sizes in both contemporary and traditional designs. You can also create your own hamper. Also Read – ‘Playing Jojo was emotionally exhausting’Where: Sidewalk, Hyatt Regency Price: Rs 1750 – 4550 Spread happiness this Diwali with specially crafted gift hampers from Jaypee Greens Golf and Spa Resort. Cherish relationships and create new bonds on this auspicious occasion with an array of bespoke treats. From chocolates to contemporary-style diyas, to an assortment of finely crafted gourmet delicacies, guests can also tailor their own gift basket as per their need.Where: The Old Baker @Jaypee Greens Golf and Spa Resort Also Read – Leslie doing new comedy special with NetflixPrice: Rs 3500 – 4500 + taxesShangri-La’s – Eros Hotel, celebrates the festival of joy with an array of Diwali hampers from UNO2GO, the hotel’s patisserie. Gift your loved ones the bespoke Diwali Hampers, available in an exclusive assortment or tailor made to their very own special composition of delectable joys. It has created an elegant, sophisticated and contemporary four choices of hampers called – Jade Hamper, Diamond Hamper, Macaroon trinket box and Gold Hamper. Exclusive bespoke Hampers are available and can be personalised based on one’s requirements. Where: UNO2GO, Shangri-La’s – Eros Hotel Price: Rs. 2500 plus taxes onwardsFilled with tons of treats and gifts as The Imperial gives you a choice to select yours hamper with or without wine! From chocolates, signature souvenirs to gourmet favourites, there is a range of carefully selected eats and memorabilia, handpicked to create lasting pleasures. Pick up yours for your loved ones.Where: The Imperial Price: Rs 6000 – 8000 + taxes Living up to the vibrancy of the festive season, Eros Hotel, Nehru Place, presents an array of breathtaking Diwali Gift Hampers with an exquisite assortment. So create your very special composition of delectable joys and surprise your loved ones with a unique hamper that has been crafted especially for them! The gift hampers have been customised according to the needs and exude impeccable style and innovations. They offer hampers in various range and sizes – Superior Box, Traditional Indian Box, Tea Box, and Premium Wine Box.Where: Eros Hotel, Nehru PlacePrice: Rs 1,999 – 3,499Gift your near and dear ones , the finest expression of love this festive season with the Diwali hampers brought by Mithai Shop, Sheraton New Delhi. It includes – delicious nut and raisin, farmlite oat and almond, Kitchens of India – mango saffron, Dark Fantasy vanilla biscuit, KOI strawberry and mint, Dark Fantasy choco biscuit, moong dal halwa, KOI dal bukhara, matar paneer, paneer darbari and a lot more. Where: Mithai Shop, SheratonPrice: Rs. 5000 – 7500last_img read more

Sleep disorders may increase risk of stroke

first_imgThe findings suggest that people who have had a stroke or a mini-stroke, called a transient ischemic attack, be screened for sleep disorders. “Although sleep disorders are common after a stroke, very few stroke patients are tested for them,” said study author Dirk Hermann from University Hospital Essen in Germany. “The results of our review show that should change, as people with sleep disorders may be more likely to have another stroke or other negative outcomes than people without sleep problems, such as having to go to a nursing home after leaving the hospital,” Hermann noted. The findings, published online in the journal Neurology, are based on a literature review. For the literature review, the researchers examined dozens of studies that looked at the link between sleep disturbances and stroke. Sleep disorders generally fall into two categories – sleep breathing problems and sleep-wake disorders. Sleep breathing problems like sleep apnea disrupt breathing while asleep. Sleep-wake disorders like insomnia and restless leg syndrome affect the amount of time spent asleep.The review found evidence linking sleep breathing problems with stroke risk and recovery. Sleep-wake disorders may also increase stroke risk and harm recovery, although there is less evidence to prove so, the researchers said.last_img read more

Heres how TV limits womens sexual experience

first_imgThe way women are often portrayed on television helps accentuate the traditional roles at the expense of their sexual satisfaction, says a study.Media portrayals teach women to be passive participants in their relationships and prioritise the desires of others – particularly men – instead of prioritising their own desires, said Rita Seabrook from the University of Michigan in the US.The study, published in the journal Psychology of Women Quarterly, showed that college women who frequently watch television tend to endorse the gender roles that are portrayed often on TV. Also Read – Add new books to your shelfEndorsement of these roles – which are called gendered sexual scripts – results in some women having less confidence about using condoms and more shameful feelings about their sexual experience.Being confident and proud of one’s sexual experiences “conflicts with gendered expectations that women should abstain from sex except in limited circumstances,” she said.The study sampled 415 undergraduate women who described themselves as sexually active heterosexuals. Also Read – Over 2 hours screen time daily will make your kids impulsiveThey indicated the number of hours of TV (live or online) and reality TV watched weekly, and disclosed if they believed the programming reflected daily life.Questions also focused on relationships, attitudes towards women, sexual beliefs, gender roles and how participants rated their emotions.”Women who reject traditional gender norms face backlash for failing to adhere to the culture’s expectations for them,” Seabrook said. “Thus, adhering to gendered sexual scripts may protect women from perceived and actual judgment at the expense of their sexual satisfaction and sexual well-being,” Seabrook said.last_img read more

Eating slowly may help you lose weight

first_imgTrying to shed those extra kilos? Chewing slowly and refraining from eating for two hours before bedtime may help, scientists say. Changes in eating habits were strongly associated with lower obesity and weight (BMI), and smaller waist circumference, according to researchers from Kyushu University in Japan.The findings are based on health insurance data for nearly 60,000 people with diabetes in Japan who submitted claims and had regular health check-ups between 2008 and 2013. Also Read – Add new books to your shelfThe data included information on the dates of consultations and treatments, while the check-ups included measurements of weight (BMI) and waist circumference, and the results of tests for blood chemistry, urine, and liver function.During the check-ups, participants were quizzed about their lifestyle, including their eating and sleep habits as well as alcohol and tobacco use.They were specifically asked about their eating speed, which was categorised as fast, normal, or slow. Also Read – Over 2 hours screen time daily will make your kids impulsiveThey were asked whether they did any of the following three or more times a week: eat dinner within 2 hours of going to sleep; snack after dinner; and skip breakfast.More than a third (36.5 per cent) of participants had one check-up over the six years, while just under a third (29.5 per cent) had two. One in five (20 per cent) had three.At the start of the study, some 22,070 people routinely wolfed down their food; 33,455 ate at a normal speed; and 4,192 lingered over every mouthful. The slow eaters tended to be healthier and to have a healthier lifestyle than either the fast or normal speed eaters.Around half of the total sample changed their eating speed over the course of the six years.All the aspects of eating and sleeping habits studied, as well as alcohol consumption and previous obesity – defined as a BMI of 25 kilogrammes per square metres were significantly associated with obesity.After taking account of potentially influential factors, the results showed that compared with those who tended to gobble up their food, those who ate at a normal speed were 29 percent less likely to be obese, rising to 42 percent for those who ate slowly.Although absolute reductions in waist circumference – an indicator of a potentially harmful midriff bulge – were small, they were greater among the slow and normal speed eaters.Snacking after dinner and eating within two hours of going to sleep three or more times a week were also strongly linked to changes in BMI. However, skipping breakfast was not.last_img read more

Suitable options to pair with your wine

first_imgWine and food pairing is not that difficult as it sounds. One just needs to keep in mind that the selection of wine must compliment the taste of food ordered, say experts. Experts share tips on most suitable options to pair with your wine. -One can pair their favourite wine with other delicious food too. The most common food items that you can pair your wine with is pizzas, pastas, salads, burgers, pies, seafoods to name a few. These are some of the food items that we eat on any normal day, so we should also be thinking of pairing our wines with them. Also Read – Add new books to your shelf-One must remember the thumb rule for wine and food pairing; white wine compliments white meat and red wine is great with red meat. -Cabernet Sauvignon is indeed the undisputed King of red wines. France, Italy and Napa Valley are the best producers. You can pair your spicy meat pizza with a Cabernet Sauvignon or a Pinotage and is also best paired with red meats like black peppered tenderloin and lamb chops in five spices. -Veg pizza would brilliantly go with Merlot. The idea is to not overpower the wine but to blend in. One can also try pork loin, slow cooked lamb stew and shepherd’s pie with a good Merlot. Merlots are normally light to medium bodied and often are blended with other grapes. France and Italy are top producers. Also Read – Over 2 hours screen time daily will make your kids impulsive-Pinot Noir, one of the most versatile red grapes, best produced in France, United States and Germany. It is generally paired with food having strong earthy flavours. Try it with mushroom and greens with tofu in soya sauce, spaghetti bolognaise or a grilled salmon. -Similarly, you could have your red sauce pasta with a Shiraz, medium bodied grape with a hint of tannin is best produced in France, Australia and Spain. This can also be paired with roast lamb, grilled beef and lamb chops. -Sauvignon Blanc or Rose would go well with salads and also with mussels, char grilled lobsters, tajine and creamy tuscan chicken. -If seafood is your soul food, then the go to wine is Chardonnay, one of the most popular white grapes, or a riesling or a sparkling. -Another favourite food and wine pairing is the Indian street food. Try a pani puri with a Chenin Blanc or a samosa with Riesling. Try the quintessential tikki chat with a Cabernet Sauvignon or Pinot Noir.-Chenin Blanc has floral aromas, mostly young wines are produced in Loire Valley. Have it with shish taouk or risotto with chicken and scallions.last_img read more

Skin diseases more common in elderly men

first_imgRanked as the fourth most common cause of human illness, skin diseases increasing with age are more frequent in elderly men than in women, say researchers. The study, published in the Journal of the European Academy of Dermatology and Venereology, showed that skin diseases are more prevalent than thought earlier, but many affected people do not consult a physician. Over 70 per cent elderly men were found suffering from skin diseases, which is more than women (58 per cent). Also Read – Add new books to your shelf”Skin diseases might be even more prevalent than previously thought. Considering their significant impact on individual, family and social life, as well as their heavy economic burden caused by inadequate self- or non-physician treatment, the public health importance of skin diseases is underappreciated,” said Alexander Zink, of the Technical University of Munich. For the study, the team included 2,701 individuals. Of these, at least one skin abnormality was observed in 1,662 of the participants (64.5 per cent). The most common diagnoses were actinic keratosis (26.6 per cent), rosacea (25.5 per cent), and eczema (11.7 per cent). But nearly two-thirds of the affected participants were unaware of their abnormal skin findings. “Information and awareness campaigns are needed to better address this neglected issue and to reduce the global burden of skin diseases,” Zink added.last_img read more