Driver Education/Safety

first_imgThe University of Georgia Traffic Injury Prevention Institute has been awarded a $656,000 grant from the Georgia Governor’s Office of Highway Safety (GOHS) to continue statewide child passenger safety, parent and teen driving safety, and senior driver education programs.The Georgia Traffic Injury Prevention Institute (GTIPI) has partnered with GOHS for the past 30 years in designing and delivering education that improves driver and passenger safety throughout a person’s lifespan. The institute continues to be a leading resource in traffic safety training and education in Georgia.The Georgia GOHS-UGA partnership began in 1986 when federal grant funds were awarded to states with highway safety offices. The grants were to be used for partnering with institutions of higher education to address traffic injuries, with an education and enforcement approach to reducing fatalities. In Georgia, UGA Cooperative Extension uses the grant to conduct classes for parents and caregivers on the consistent and correct use of child safety seats in all of Georgia’s 159 counties.Originally named the Occupant Safety Education Program, the project was renamed GTIPI in 2002. The institute continues today as an outreach initiative of UGA Extension and the UGA College of Family and Consumer Sciences.Through this year’s grant award, the institute will offer four training and community education initiatives: the National Child Passenger Safety Technician (CPST) Certification Program, “Georgia Teens Ride with P.R.I.D.E.” (Parents Reducing Injuries and Driver Error), CarFit for senior drivers and the Online Safety Store.Each program area delivers adult education to consumers, safety professionals and community volunteers and is designed to address the most common causes of traffic injuries and fatalities for target age groups. GTIPI also serves as a statewide resource for answering consumer questions about safe travel. Law enforcement, emergency medical services, health departments, Extension educators, fire departments and others across the state participate in GTIPI’s training and distribute educational materials. On-site training is conducted across the state at regional locations and GTIPI’s headquarters and training facility in Conyers, Georgia.Parents and young children benefit from safety professionals and volunteers who receive national certification in the child passenger safety technician course.“Even though child safety seats are used more than 90 percent of the time by Georgia parents, child passenger safety technicians consistently find that almost all of those in use are installed incorrectly,” said Don Bower, UGA professor emeritus and GTIPI project director. “The National CPST Certification course offered by GTIPI qualifies public safety professionals and community volunteers to teach parents how to eliminate installation and use mistakes.”The P.R.I.D.E. program trains instructors how to deliver safe driving tools to the community. For the last 10 years, GTIPI’s course for parents and their new teen drivers, “Georgia Teens Ride with P.R.I.D.E.,” has worked to reduce teen injuries and fatalities through education.A train-the-trainer certification course equips P.R.I.D.E. instructors to help parents guide their teens through the driver’s licensing process and helps teens learn how to avoid crashes. P.R.I.D.E. instructors equip both the parent and teen with accurate information about how to obtain and keep a Georgia driver’s license.“Georgia Teens Ride with P.R.I.D.E.” was showcased by the national Governors Highway Safety Association in 2013 for its strong educational impacts on state-graduated driver licensing laws and parental involvement.“Car crashes remain the leading cause of death for teens, and more than two-thirds of teens who die in crashes in Georgia weren’t buckled up,” Bower said.The national CarFit program is designed for drivers aged 55 and older. It helps seniors stay behind the wheel longer and more safely.“CarFit is a non-threatening way to educate seniors about how to stay safe and comfortable in their cars as their physical abilities change with age,” Bower said.The Online Safety Store is a partnership between GOHS and GTIPI. Now in its ninth year of collaboration, the store is Georgia’s primary source for print and electronic traffic safety resources for public safety, public health, traffic safety professionals and consumers. GTIPI manages the distribution of GOHS materials from www.gahighwaysafety.org.For more information on GTIPI traffic safety training and programs or other traffic-related resources, go to www.gtipi.org or call 800-342-9819.last_img read more

Hurricane Michael Totals

first_imgHurricane Michael blew across southwest Georgia on Oct. 10, causing more than $2 billion in losses to the state’s agriculture industry, according to early estimates from University of Georgia Cooperative Extension agricultural economists and Extension agents.“These are our best estimates (as of Oct. 17) on information from UGA Extension agents in the field, as well as our Extension specialists,” said Laura Perry Johnson, associate dean of UGA Extension. “They have traveled many miles and seen many fields to gather this data and worked with economists to come up with these estimates. As we learn more, these estimates could change.”PECANSThe state’s pecan industry suffered a $100 million loss from this year’s crop plus $260 million in lost trees. An additional $200 million in future profits will be lost over the next decade as new orchards are planted and existing orchards are reestablished, said Lenny Wells, UGA Extension pecan specialist.Between 30 and 40 percent of the pecan trees were destroyed in Dougherty, Lee and Mitchell counties, where 30 percent of Georgia’s pecan crop is produced. In areas less severely affected by the storm, growers with trees that are still standing will be able to harvest a lot of the nuts that were blown to the ground, Wells said.Overall, Wells believes that half of Georgia’s pecan crop has been lost for this year.COTTONCotton fields that promised near-record harvest were destroyed by the hurricane; some fields in southwest Georgia have been declared a complete loss with all the cotton now blown off the plants and lying on the ground.The hurricane crushed the prospects of 1,500 to 1,800 pounds of dryland cotton for some cotton growers, who suffered losses of 80 to 90 percent in some fields.“It’s much worse than I thought it would be,” said Jared Whitaker, UGA Extension cotton agronomist. “Southwest of (Tifton, Georgia), it’s terrible, in Bainbridge and Donalsonville … pictures I’ve received from Washington County will make you feel sick.”While farmers in southeast Georgia slipped by with as little as 15 percent loss, some southwest Georgia farmers are looking at total losses in some fields, he said.“I think what we do from here on out is going to vary in a lot of places. In some places I’ve seen, I don’t think we’ll even pull a picker in there to harvest the crop. I think we lost so much cotton that it wouldn’t be profitable to even harvest it,” Whitaker said.The fact that the storm struck when the cotton was near harvest made the impact even more severe. Whitaker estimates that only 15 percent of this year’s crop was already picked before Hurricane Michael arrived, while a small portion of the crop was planted late enough to be relatively safe.Georgia cotton crop loss estimates vary widely, from $550 to $600 million in lost lint and seed.PEANUTSThe loss to Georgia’s peanut crop is estimated to be between $10 and $20 million. The hurricane dealt a devastating blow to local buying points and peanut shellers when it traveled through Bainbridge, Donalsonville, Camilla, Albany and Cordele, Georgia, which represent a significant portion of the state’s peanut-producing community.“In the western part of the state, there has been significant damage to drying shelters and elevators that will slow the harvest down. Ultimately, growers may have to field-dry peanuts until repairs are made,” said UGA Extension peanut agronomist Scott Monfort. “The loss of elevators could also cause a backlog of trailers for farmers who are trying to drop off their crop. This will again slow down harvest at a time when producers are trying to get their peanuts out of the field.”Before the storm, 40 to 45 percent of Georgia’s peanut crop was still in the field, he said. Now growers must harvest the remaining crop without losing too much in weight and quality. Some nuts will be lost due to overmaturity or disease as growers could not dig peanuts due to the storm, Monfort said.VEGETABLESGeorgia’s late summer and fall vegetable crop was also close to harvest or in the midst of harvest when Hurricane Michael arrived. The damage varies significantly across southwestern Georgia counties, but the loss is estimated at more than $480 million.Some vegetable farmers in the direct path of the storm lost close to 90 percent, while others on the edges of the storm lost around 20 to 30 percent. A 20 percent loss is quite significant for an individual farmer, said Greg Fonsah, the UGA Cooperative Extension agricultural economist who was charged with calculating the crop loss and its economic impact.Sweet corn producers, many of which were in the direct path of the storm, were hardest hit, with losses of up to 100 percent of their remaining crop. In Mitchell and Decatur counties, where the bulk of the state’s fall sweet corn is planted, much of the crop was destroyed, said Timothy Coolong, UGA Extension vegetable horticulture specialist.Because of the long growing season, southwest Georgia farmers are able to produce spring and fall crops of vegetables like tomatoes, sweet corn, eggplants, green beans, peppers, cucumbers and squash. Harvest occurs in June and October for spring and fall crops, respectively.”A lot of farmers were just starting their main harvest for fall crops when the storm hit,” Coolong said. Plants that were fully loaded with produce were pushed down by 60 mph winds with gusts from 80 to 100 mph. This phenomenon, known as lodging, not only makes produce hard to harvest, it exposes the fruit to the sun, which causes sunburn, a condition that makes the fruit unmarketable.Many of the state’s cool-season vegetables, which were just transplanted, were spared. Although some damage is expected, most of the plants were small enough to be somewhat sheltered from the hurricane’s winds.NURSERY INDUSTRYGeorgia’s nursery production industry, which produces trees and ornamental plants for landscapes across the southeast, suffered $13 million as nurseries in the southwest corner of the state were damaged.TIMBERThe Georgia Forestry Commission reported that the hurricane damaged about 2 million in acres in timberland, valued at $374 million. About 79,000 acres of forestland are a complete loss, according to Georgia Forestry Commissioner Chuck Williams.POULTRY, LIVESTOCK, TIMBER AND SOYBEANSThe poultry industry losses are estimated at $25 million in lost birds and houses. Soybean growers suffered a $10 to $20 million loss. Livestock and dairy farmers suffered infrastructure losses, like fencing and forage, but UGA Extension economists have no real estimate for livestock losses. Dairy farmers lost milk production due to power outages, which prevented them from milking cows and storing their milk safely.  (UGA Extension public relations coordinators Merritt Melancon and Clint Thompson contributed to this report. This story was update Oct. 26 to reflect the latest damage estimates.)last_img read more

Gov. Douglas Announces $4.96 Million for Homeland Security, Majority of Funds to Local Units

first_imgMontpelier, Vt.- Governor Jim Douglas announced that Homeland SecuritySecretary Tom Ridge is making a total of $4,963,000 of fiscal year 2003grant funds available for local and state homeland security preparedness inVermont. The money is for domestic preparedness equipment, training andplanning.Governor Douglas said that Vermont’s Homeland Security Unit (HSU) would workwith all response organizations in the state to ensure that grant fundsreach the largest number of participants in the most effective manner.”Over the next 30 days we will be working closely with representatives fromthe U.S. Department of Homeland Security to finalize the details of thisgrant,” Douglas said. “These additional resources will allow our localfirst responders and state public safety units to be more prepared for avariety of public safety scenarios.”The Governor said that the Homeland Security Unit would be reaching out toall first responder departments to notify them of the availability of funds.The allocation is part of nearly $600 million that has been made availablenationwide by the Bush administration for local homeland security efforts.Vermont’s emergency responders will receive nearly $3.5 million forequipment. “Eighty percent of the equipment allocation must be passeddirectly through to local communities. The state’s twenty percent will beused to purchase, among other things, a hazardous material response trailerfor Southern Vermont,” Douglas said.The grant also includes $ 861, 000 for exercises, $261,000 for training and$348,000 for planning.The Department of Public Safety, Homeland Security Unit, will managedistribution of grant funds at the state level.Information will also be posted on the HSU website atwww.vthomelandsecurity.org(link is external) .last_img read more

Audit of homeland security and emergency management grants

first_imgVermont State Auditor Randy Brock’s report dictated that the Department of Public Safety (DPS) should seek repayment of $30,976 from three local government entities: $7,508 from the Village of Johnson; $19,650 from the Town of Norwich; and $3,818 from Rutland County Clerks Collaborative (RCCC).The Village of Johnson applied for a grant to replace equipment destroyed in a fire at the fire department building. At the same time, they acquired another reimbursement for this equipment by its insurance company and through the approval of DPS. The Town of Norwich applied for a grant to install a backup generator for its municipal building. However, a bulk of its matching contribution included the appraised value of a generator that was acquired several years prior. RCCC applied for a grant to hire a consultant to conduct risk assessments for its 14 member towns. To meet the local match requirement a DPS employee improperly encouraged the RCCC to submit the value of donated time by a paid contractor and false documentation of a cash vendor payment.In each of these cases, federal grant requirements or DPS accounting policies were violated. Brock’s report was a recommendation that DPS set up a process for tracking audit findings to resolution to be sure that all identified improper repayments are fully reimbursed.last_img read more

Sigma SD-10 Digital SLR Camera With 18-50MM DC Kit

first_imgFoveon X3(R) direct image sensor in the Sigma SD10 digital SLR can capture all RGB colors at each and every pixel. The revolutionary design of Foveon X3(R) direct image sensor features three layers of pixel sensors Using three silicon-embedded layers of pixel sensors, stacked to take advantage of silicon’s ability to absorb red, green, and blue light at different respective depths, the Foveon X3(R) direct image sensor can thereby directly capture full color and detail at each and every pixel location, without interpolation.With the RAW data recording system of the SIGMA SD10, it is possible to obtain high picture definition and compact file size. The lossless compression system of RAW data, eliminates image deterioration, provides superior pictures, without sacrificing original image quality and retains full image capture details.Depending on the intention of the photographer, the SIGMA SD10 allows photographers to select the resolution of RAW data images in one of three resolutions. HI mode (2268x1512x3 layers) delivers highest resolution image performance. MED mode (1512x1008x3 layers) has high definition and recording capacity. LOW mode (1134x756x3 layers) for capturing the most images per given memory capacity.The SD10 comes with SIGMA Photo Pro 2.0 software for modifying recorded RAW data image files. It is easy to make adjustments (white balance, exposure, color balance, and contrast for example) in three modes. The X3F mode stores the original settings of the image at point of capture. In the auto adjustment mode the software analyzes and automatically makes adjustments of RAW data. The custom -mode allows the photographer to make individual adjustments to exposure, contrast, shadow, highlight, sharpness, and saturation. The latest addition to Sigma Photo Pro 2.0 software is X3 Fill Light. This easy to use facility corrects tones on images of high contrast exposure or backlit pictures.In Default or normal mode the ISO sensitivity of SD10 can be set to 100, 200, 400 and 800. If Extended Mode is selected, it is possible to use ISO 1600 sensitivity. In any ISO sensitivity setting, it is possible to select a high shutter speed from 1/6000 sec. to a slow shutter speed of 30secs.SIGMA SD10 is equipped with a “sport finder” which offers a view that extends outside of the frame. The area that is out of the image sensor coverage range is marked by transparent light gray, to distinguish it from the active picture taking area.The Sigma SD10 records on reliable, high capacity Type I and Type II CF (CompactFlash) cards or a Microdrive to hold larger volumes of data.The SIGMA SD10 is equipped with a large 1.8″ appr.130,000 dot low temperature polysilicon TFT-LCD mo nitor with white LED on the back panel, which displays images, menus and histogram. The coverage area of the LCD monitor is 100%, of that seen from the viewfinder .last_img read more

John Cohn of IBM works with Champlain College

first_imgBURLINGTON, Vt. John Cohn, PhD, chief scientist of design automation in the IBM Systems and Technology Group, has been working with students and faculty in the Emergent Media Center at Champlain College this winter.Cohn, an IBM Fellow and Vice President for the Americas for the IBM Academy, and five Champlain College game development students have been creating a multimedia educational companion piece for an electronic game that IBM has developed for Engineering Week 2008. The educational product will be delivered in a multimedia way that kids relate to, and it will illuminate what makes up an electronic game and what courses of study and careers are available in game-related fields.For Cohn, this is a self-designed assignment at Champlain that will benefit IBMs OnDemand Community outreach program. One of IBM and Cohns driving goals is to break through the negative perceptions of kids who might be turned off by science and technology. I know thats a hard problem to change perceptions, he said. But technology, science or math can be so beautiful, much in the way music and art are beautiful.Working with the Champlain College students has been mind-blowingly great, Cohn said. These students really get it. Game development students Ian Bissett, Michael Fowler, Bryan Hare, Wesley Knee and Lauren Nishikawa make up Cohns team.IBM built the processors for the Xbox 360, Playstation 3 and Wii. IBM doesnt currently make games, but we provide a lot the technology behind them, Cohn explained.In addition to his technical duties at IBM, Cohn has long promoted the excitement behind science and technology. Hes delivered entertaining science presentations to more than 30,000 school children over the years. In the near future, he hopes to employ new media such as online science and technology videos to create more enthusiasm for science and technology among Americas youth.last_img read more

Burlington Airport Announces Plans to Add Parking

first_img$45 million project would add two floors and 1,400 spaces without taxpayer costAt a press conference on Wednesday, February 11, 2009, Brian Searles, Director of Aviation at Burlington International Airport, unveiled plans for a major expansion to the airport s parking facilities. The need for additional parking at the airport has become acute, said Searles. Enplanements for Calendar Year 2008 were up 7.3% over 2007. In 2008, the existing garage was filled to capacity at least once nearly every day from February through October. Searles added that when the primary lot is full, vehicles must be moved to the Park & Shuttle location, or even to off-site temporary lots. The result is inconvenience to customers and lost revenue.To be completed in phases, the new project would ultimately add two floors and 1,400 parking spaces. The addition will also incorporate a variety of creative energy-efficiency features. The phases are scalable, depending on economic conditions. The full build-out cost for the project is estimated to be $45 million. To pay for the construction, the airport is asking Burlington to seek voter approval in March for a Revenue Supported General Obligation Bond.Searles added, It is critical to understand that this project will not result in any increase in Burlington area residents taxes. I can t stress that strongly enough. The project will produce sufficient revenue increase to repay the bond without raising taxes. Searles also noted that voter approval does not commit the city to actual sale of the bonds, nor to spending at any particular level.Source: Burlington International Airportlast_img read more

Timberline Interactive and CommerceV3 announce merger

first_imgFast-growing e-commerce platform provider CommerceV3 and leading online marketing agency Timberline Interactive of Middlebury today announced a merger. The combined company will unite a proven online store platform with a vast array of e-commerce marketing services.”Our team was already working in the CommerceV3 environment to grow orders and sales for many of our clients,” says Bud Reed, founder of Timberline. “In many ways, this merger was driven by our focus on the customers. It gives them even more technology options and streamlines website launch and development processes.”Reed, who launched Timberline Interactive ten years ago, is retiring from day-to-day operational duties but will continue in an advisory role to provide strategic direction for the combined companies.CommerceV3 president Nathan Focht rarely gets excited, but he recognizes a new and unique opportunity for merchants. “The CV3 platform has always had a strong feature set to help customers grow their sales, but this merger puts us way ahead of the curve. Tom Funk and the rest of the team at Timberline are masters at tuning web stores for maximum growth. They have a huge playbook for making money online.”Blake Ellis, who co-founded CommerceV3 with Nathan, will serve as the new president of Timberline. Ellis is a serial entrepreneur who has been involved in several Internet start-ups over the years, including CommerceV3, Rails Machine and ResEngine.com. “Timberline brings a wealth of experience to the table, especially their work launching sophisticated sites and growing revenue for large merchants with complex needs. CommerceV3 provides a strong, affordable technical foundation. Together we offer a high octane growth solution to merchants large and small — a combination you can’t find anywhere else in our industry.”Tom Funk will serve as VP of Marketing for the new organization. Funk has been with Timberline for three years and before that worked as Web Manager for the Vermont Teddy Bear Company, where he managed sites doing $46 million a year in e-commerce sales. He is a frequent speaker at Internet Retailer, Shop.org and other industry events and is the author of the book Web 2.0 and Beyond: Understanding the New Online Business Models, Trends, and Technologies.”Today, businesses need to take advantage of every online revenue source: paid search, SEO, email and more. But their success also depends on the features and flexibility of their e-commerce platforms,” says Funk. “This deal brings together two leading e-commerce companies who can now offer both pieces: the online marketing services to drive traffic and the online store technology to convert it to sales.””CommerceV3 meets even complex customer requirements straight out of the box,” says Deb Brisson, Timberline’s VP of Software Development. “And when we need to go further, we utilize TI Commerce.” TI Commerce is an entirely customizable commerce platform built using the Microsoft .NET programming environment. “With CV3 and TI Commerce, we have more technical flexibility than any other provider in the industry, period.””This is big news in multi-channel and direct marketing circles,” says Scott Weaver of Atlanta-based Colinear Systems, a software firm specializing in order management software for large retailers. “Anybody who has searched for products on Google and shopped online has probably encountered the work of these two firms without knowing it. They’re the folks behind the scenes who make finding products and ordering online a smooth and easy process. This is a great opportunity for their existing customers as well as any merchants who want to thrive on the web.”About Timberline InteractiveTimberline Interactive is a leading online marketing and development company specializing in e-commerce solutions for direct marketers and catalogers. They are experts in all aspects of online marketing, including search engine optimization (SEO), paid search campaign management, e-mail campaign management and site usability optimization. Timberline’s clients include Wine of the Month Club, Dinn Trophies, Lake Champlain Chocolates, American Meadows, Terry Precision Bicycles and others.About CommerceV3CommerceV3 (CV3) is a web-based system that allows users to create, populate, customize, maintain and track e-commerce storefronts. It makes selling online as easy as possible, without sacrificing real power. Designed from the ground up for direct-mail merchants, CV3 is PCI-compliant and features integration with order management packages as well as tools to customize pages, drive traffic, manage online inventory availability, process orders, and track revenue. CommerceV3 powers hundreds of storefronts for merchants across the U.S. and Canada.Source: Timberline. Middlebury, VT, USA – September 10, 2009 – ###last_img read more

Burlington Police Chief Schirling testifies before Senate panel

first_imgStatement Of Senator Patrick Leahy (D-Vt.),Chairman, Senate Judiciary Committee,Hearing On Encouraging Innovative and Cost-Effective Crime Reduction StrategiesMarch 3, 2010Today, the Committee returns to the critical issue of finding the best strategies for reducing crime.  I chaired a hearing in the last Congress on this issue, and we now consider what the next steps can and should be. We will hear about innovative approaches that are working in police departments and criminal justice systems across the country, and examine what the Federal Government can do to encourage the adoption of approaches that work to keep our communities safe.  I hope we can make bipartisan progress on this issue.  We all want to effectively and efficiently reduce crime and keep our neighborhoods safe.In the 1990s, with the leadership of then-Senator Joe Biden and others, we passed legislation to create and fund the COPS program and other important initiatives, which put thousands of new officers on the street and encouraged innovative policing strategies.  Law enforcement leaders in cities and towns throughout the country, bolstered by this national support, revolutionized the way policing was done throughout the country.  These efforts led to the unprecedented drops in violent crime we saw during the 1990s.That progress stalled in the last decade as Federal funding for state and local law enforcement dried up, and Federal attention to finding the best approaches to reducing crime wavered.  Rates of crime stayed largely stagnant, despite skyrocketing incarceration rates, and some communities saw significant resurgences in violent crime. One of the factors that prevented the crime problem from worsening in the last decade was continuing innovation at the local level.  Enterprising police chiefs, hard working law enforcement officers, judges and community leaders worked together to find new and more effective crime reduction strategies, and many communities saw this work pay good dividends. The economic downturn has put an even greater strain on our communities efforts to keep crime rates down.  In response to this growing crisis, Congress and the President acted decisively, including $4 billion in Federal assistance to state and local law enforcement in last year s stimulus legislation.  I fought hard for that funding, and the results are already being felt.  Crime rates are coming down as police departments are adding or retaining officers and implementing new initiatives.Even with this help, though, police departments and criminal justice systems remain short on resources.  More money alone will not solve the problem.  It is important that cities and towns use their resources in the ways that have been proven to work best.We will hear today from leaders in the field who have been setting good examples for how our communities can make their law enforcement and crime reduction efforts work well.  Chief Mike Schirling from Burlington, Vermont, has brought significant innovation to a small city police force.  He has implemented comprehensive community policing and partnerships with all levels of law enforcement and with schools and community groups.  He is exploring the use of alternative sanctions to set low-level offenders on the right path before they enter the criminal justice system, targeted programs to address mental health needs, consolidation of resources to help police departments function more efficiently, and the use of new technology to share information more effectively.Chief Rodney Monroe has made great progress in Richmond and now Charlotte with initiatives like using technology to pinpoint law enforcement efforts and integrating law enforcement with economic development and job training.  Colonel Dean Esserman has made Providence into a national leader in community-based policing.  Chief Patrick Berarducci has also brought innovation to a small city police force.There are good examples from across the country.  Cities like Los Angeles and Chicago are seeing results with gang outreach and mediation initiatives.  Thinkers on crime reduction strategy like Jeremy Travis and David Kennedy with the National Network for Safe Communities have helped communities throughout the country effectively tackle intractable crime problems.  The HOPE program in Hawaii has shown that probation supervision with swift and certain consequences can greatly reduce recidivism.  Many jurisdictions have had great success with juvenile prevention and reentry programs.Today s witnesses come from communities that look like much of America and prove that innovative and effective crime reduction approaches are not restricted to the biggest cities with the greatest resources.  I hope that by highlighting these successes, we can encourage other communities to follow their lead.I believe the Federal Government can and must help by spreading the word about strategies that work, and also by targeted funding and support.  We have seen in Burlington and in many other cities that an initial Federal investment can make possible initiatives that would not be possible otherwise.  These programs are inexpensive and cost effective.  Over time, they should more than pay for themselves by reducing the costs of crime, improving local economies and creating jobs, and reducing the need for federal assistance. I know there is disagreement about Federal support for state and local law enforcement.  I hope there can be broad bipartisan agreement on supporting cost effective strategies that work to keep our communities safer.Source: LEahy’s office. 3.2.2010# # # # # Burlington Police Chief Michael E Schirling testified Tuesday afternoon before a congressional panel chaired by Senator Patrick Leahy (D-VT).  Leahy invited Schirling to testify at a Senate Judiciary Committee hearing on Encouraging Innovative and Cost-Effective Crime Reduction Strategies.Leahy has made state and local law enforcement issues a priority for the Judiciary Committee this Congress.  He dedicated the first hearing of the 111th Congress to examining the needs of state and local law enforcement.  Last year, Leahy worked to secure $4 billion in the American Recovery and Reinvestment Act (ARRA) for state and local law enforcement, including the successful Community Oriented Policing Services (COPS) program.  Twenty-five police departments in Vermont were recipients of COPS funding included in the ARRA.  In 2008, Leahy twice brought the Judiciary Committee to Vermont to hear testimony about community efforts to address crime. We have seen in Burlington and in many other cities that an initial Federal investment can make possible initiatives that would not be possible otherwise, Leahy said at the hearing.  These programs are inexpensive and cost effective.  Over time, they should more than pay for themselves by reducing the costs of crime, improving local economies, creating jobs, and reducing the need for federal assistance.  Schirling testified about the Burlington Police Department s success in developing and enhancing community policing.  Over the last 11 years, our policing paradigm shifted from a response-based model to one embracing the core tenets of community policing partnership and problem solving with an eye toward preventing crime and mitigating disorder on our streets and in our neighborhoods, said Schirling.   We believe that critical law enforcement innovation can occur not just in traditional policing endeavors, but also in other areas. Chief Schirling has brought significant innovation to a small city police force, said Leahy.  He has implemented comprehensive community policing and partnerships with all levels of law enforcement and with schools and community groups.Police departments across the country are facing cutbacks in resources and funding during difficult economic times, and are increasingly looking to local business and community organizations to help identify and implement innovative strategies to address violence and crime.Audio and video footage will be available later this afternoon.An archived webcast will be available online later today. # # # # #last_img read more

Williamsville covered bridge to close July 5 for replacement

first_imgThe Vermont Agency of Transportation will begin to replace the Williamsville Covered Bridge on Dover Road on Monday, July 5. The bridge will be out of service through August 29, 2010. The detour around the bridge on Parish Hill and Baker Brook Road is about two miles long and will have signs. Motorists should factor time for the detour into their travel plans.The Williamsville Covered Bridge reconstruction project involves reconstructing the existing historic bridge, built around 1850, with a new replacement covered bridge. VTRANS expects to open the new bridge to traffic on August 30. Source: VTrans Director Planning, Outreach & Community Affairs 6.29.2010last_img read more